Highlands Council

Building Community at Issaquah Highlands

aka Issaquah Highlands Council   |   Issaquah, WA   |  https://www.issaquahhighlands.com/

Mission

The mission of the Highlands Council is to foster the development of a vibrant and caring community committed to service, diversity, stewardship and well-being.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Christy Garrard

President of the Board of Trustees

Kimberly Kapustein

Main address

2550 NE Park Dr

Issaquah, WA 98029 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-0517122

NTEE code info

Housing Owners, Renters Organizations (L50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Engagement

Highlands Council is defining what community building means and what success looks like. Highlands Council encourages residents to share their passions with others, empowering them to begin affinity groups with free use of the Blakely Hall community center (owned and operated by Highlands Council) and providing marketing support from the Highlands Council communications team. This support sets the new volunteer leader up for success, allowing to develop skills slowly. Highlands Council has over 25 community groups that are resident-initiated and resident-led. These community groups include activities for all ages from toddlers to teens, and singles to seniors, and many cultural groups too!
The Highlands Council team has over 20 years of event planning experience and has grown the annual Highlands Day from a block party for a few hundred in 2010 to a professionally produced festival for 5,000 guests hosted at the end of every summer. Highlands Day involves recruiting over 100 community volunteers; a wonderful opportunity for the neighbor who cannot commit to a recurring leadership role in the community but wants to serve annually in a significant way. The festival is funded by local business sponsorships that leadership has cultivated over the years by building trust in the quality of the event and return on investment funding the Highlands Day Festival annually consistently provides.
Highlands Council also produces many other events annually including art classes and exhibitions, candidate forums, social and service projects for teens and adults, and a variety of cultural celebrations.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Awards

Newsletter of the Year 2019

Neighborhoods USA

Affiliations & memberships

Neighborhoods USA Member 2018

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People who live, work, or play in Issaquah Highlands, a master-planned, urban village of 12,000 residents.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Public safety and crime was a top category from our January 2021 survey 'community concerns' question. We conducted video interviews and published on our blog page with the Chief of Police, Battalion Chief of the Fire Department, and the Chief Medical Officer from our local hospital asking the top 5 community questions. We are also hosting a virtual town hall with the Chief of Police in May, that will be facilitated by Highlands Council's Cross Cultural Committee on the topic of Black Lives Matter and Stop Asian Hate.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners, Mayor and City Council,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Highlands Council's Values and Assurances statement includes community relationships, diversity, and involvement as organizational priorities. Providing all stakeholders a voice in community matters, fostering communication within the community, and being proactive in addressing issues and community needs define the culture of our organization and is a filter for every decision and strategy. Highlands Council has cultivated a community that expects to have a voice and expects to be heard.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Highlands Council
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Highlands Council

Board of directors
as of 6/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kimberly Kapustein

Zetron

Term: 2018 - 2024

David Ngai

Allstate Insurance

Anna Preyapongpisan

YWCA King County

Jimmy Ochiltree

Regency Centers

Phil Nored

HNN Washington

Chris Beaudoin

Swedish Hospital

Lisa Soboslai

Year Up

Zach Hall

Issaquah Council Member

Ami Desai-Mehta

University of Washington

Larry Norton

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/21/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.