COLLEGE BRIDGE INC

College success is a K-16 initiative.

aka The College Bridge, Inc.   |   Duarte, CA   |  http://www.college-bridge.org

Mission

To create student-focused systemic change in K–16 institutions that ensures both college readiness and success.

Ruling year info

2013

Founder & CEO

Dr. Lynn Cevallos

Main address

1191 Huntington Dr. #126

Duarte, CA 91010 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-1215081

NTEE code info

Nonmonetary Support N.E.C. (B19)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Two major roadblocks students face on their path toward college graduation are math remediation and the lack of a college plan. Math remediation is particularly detrimental for underrepresented (low-income, minority, first-generation college) students in both urban and rural areas across the state. College Bridge rejects the traditional “wait-to-fail” method and instead focuses on preparing students school-wide to demonstrate college math readiness in a variety of ways before they graduate from high school. Second, our students' lack of a cogent strategy toward graduation greatly delays their time to degree (in the best case scenario) or leads them to drop out of college (worst case scenario). Regardless, College Bridge works to ameliorate both of these challenges faced by underserved students.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

South Los Angeles Math (SLAM) Program

SLAM is an intersegmental partnership between CSULA, CSUDH, LAUSD, BPUSD, and The Alliance for College Ready Public Schools. It's overarching purpose is to increase the college math readiness rates of their students while still in high school.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Students

M-PReP is an intersegmental partnership between College Bridge, CSUs, Community Colleges, School Districts, and Charter Management Organizations. It's overarching purpose is to increase high school students' college math readiness rates before they matriculate into higher education institutions.

Population(s) Served
Students
Adolescents

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

CSUDH 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

College Matriculation, College Persistence, College Graduation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Math Pipeline Readiness Project (M-PReP)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the number of students who demonstrated college math readiness while still in high school. This is a strong predictor of their ability to matriculate into college & more importantly graduate.

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Math Pipeline Readiness Project (M-PReP)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

College Bridge's Goals for the 2020-2021 Academic Year are:

Policy Goal: Recommend policy changes based on successful, equitable college readiness and success programming.

Partnership Goal: Develop strategic partnerships that improve the reach to underrepresented (low-income, minority, first-generation) students.

Program Goal #1:
College Access & Success Goal: Establish the environment, attitudes, and practices which empower schools and communities to thrive in an equitable college-going culture.

Program Goal #2:
Academic Preparation Program Goal: Develop a 21st century classroom model that aligns K-16 math curricula to create a seamless transition for students to progress to college and career.

Strategy: Please see recommendations or objectives under each goal below.

Policy Goal: Recommend policy changes based on successful, equitable college readiness and success programming.
Policy Recommendation #1: Create a shared definition of “college readiness” between K-12 and Higher Ed partners.
Policy Recommendation #2: Develop a new nationwide framework for the post-pandemic public education system that includes shared accountability for student outcomes throughout K-16.
Policy Recommendation #3: Provide targeted college readiness and success professional development and planning time for public K-16 administrators, instructors, and counselors/advisors.

Partnership Goal: Develop strategic partnerships that improve the reach to underrepresented (low-income, minority, first-generation) students.
Objective #1: Improve the rate of African-American students, especially males, participating in and succeeding in STEM courses and majors.
Objective #2: Increase partnerships in rural communities in CA and nationwide.

Program Goal #1:
Academic Preparation Program Goal: Develop a 21st century classroom model that aligns K-16 math curricula to create a seamless transition for students to progress to college and career.
Objective #1: Create articulated academic readiness and success plan with our K-12 partners.
Objective #2: Vertically align math education through K-16.

Program Goal #2:
College Access & Success Goal: Establish the environment, attitudes, and practices which empower schools and communities to thrive in an equitable college-going culture.
Objective #1: Create articulated college readiness and success plans with our K-16 partners.
Objective #2: Improve proficiency in college knowledge amongst K-12 counselors.




College Bridge has been at the forefront of this issue since 2012 and we have been able to learn both challenges and best practices in this space. As such, other nonprofits, foundations, governmental agencies, school districts, and higher educational systems consult with us for our subject matter expertise. We expanded our reach throughout California in 2017 and began our nation-wide expansion in 2020.

1. 83% (N=1,103) students earned college credit in math.

2. SLAM students meet or exceed state college retention rates.

Overall, SLAM students (N=353) from both 2017 and 2018 are exceeding retention rates at the California State University. Two-thirds of the 2018 cohort have completed two years of college and are on track to graduate in four years. After three years of college, more than 80% of the 2017 cohort is on track to graduation, split almost evenly between a four- and five-year track.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    K-12 and higher education students, instructors, administrators, counselors, and staff.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently developed a diversity, equity, and inclusion board sub-committee. The committee is drafting a strategic DEI goal with actionable initiatives.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our organization engages in an action research cycle that includes evaluation to inform practices and programs. These activities build capacity in the organizations we serve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

COLLEGE BRIDGE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

COLLEGE BRIDGE INC

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James King

National Geographic Learning

Term: 2018 - 2022

James King

National Geographic Learning

Edray Goins

National Association of Mathematics

Robert Gira

AVID Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/15/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.