New Heights Community Resource Center

Cultivating Tomorrows Leaders, Today!

aka New Heights CRC   |   Bridgeton, MO   |  www.newheightscrc.org

Mission

New Heights Community Resource Center is dedicated to reducing the impact of adverse childhood experiences, and creating opportunities for under-represented youth to succeed. New Heights Community Resource Center equips, empowers, and inspires youth through out-of-school time programs, leadership development, and community engagement. Our goal is to restore, renew, and revitalize communities through integrated service delivery methods that will embrace youth and draw them to a purpose-driven life.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Connie Bobo

Main address

12567 Natural Bridge Rd

Bridgeton, MO 63044 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-1295024

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2012 and 2011.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Despite current resources, at-risk youth are unprepared to enter into and succeed in today's workforce. This is the direct result of a lack of cognitive and emotional intelligence necessary to demonstrate appropriate problem solving skills and to effectively interact with peers and authorities.

Deviant behavior is linked to low self-esteem and low-perceived life chances (feelings of hopelessness and powerlessness). In order for high risk youth to be productive happy, healthy citizens, they will need more than traditional summer jobs. They need experiences that will inform, equip, and empower them. These experiences must create opportunities for youth to “win" (see full, consistent success) academically, socially, emotionally, and physically. Multiple “wins" means increased self-esteem, demonstrated pride, and happier youth who are more willing to be a part of the solution.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Forks of Flavor

Forks of Flavor is our nutrition initiative that provides hot made from scratch meals to youth in under-resourced communities. Each year, New Heights provides more than 80,000 meals to youth participating in out-of-school time programs in St Louis City, St Louis County, St Charles County, Poplar Bluff, and Kansas City. Since 2013, we have made it possible for nearly 35 nonprofit organizations and churches to provide high quality meals to youth participating in their programs. In 2020, New Heights did not close its doors or shut down programming as a result of COVID-19. Instead, we increased our capacity from serving 425 children to over 8,100 children. Additionally, we increased the number of meals served to providing nearly 500,000 meals per month! We are dedicated to serving the community when they need us most.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Extremely poor people
Working poor

Y.E.S. is offered to youth in the community between ages 10 and 18. The youth are divided into two groups (10-14), and (15-18).

Signing up is easy- complete and sign a contact card. Workshops are weekly on Tuesday nights from 6:00pm until 8:30pm. A light supper is provided for all attendees.

Youth will gather for weekly workshops and discussions on preselected topics. These topics focus on personal growth and development, career enhancement, and social-emotional intelligence.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Our one of a kind 8-week program is designed for high school youth to foster a positive self-concept and raise awareness of how our personal image impacts our lives, careers, and our relationships.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Employability of youth is the key to contributing citizens and thriving communities. “Employability results from several factors- a foundation of core skills, access to education, availability of training opportunities, motivation, ability and support to take advantage of opportunities for continuous learning, and recognition of acquired skills- and is critical for enabling workers to attain decent work and manage change and for enabling enterprises to adopt new technologies and enter new markets" (Enhancing Youth Employability, 2013).

“In order to secure a job, retain employment and advance in the labor market, individuals need to be able to continue to learn and adapt; read, write, and compute competitively; listen and communicate effectively; think creatively; solve problems independently; manage themselves at work; interact with coworkers; work in teams or groups; handle basic technology; and lead effectively as well as follow supervision."

By implementing a program that will ensure the employability of youth, we simultaneously increase their self-awareness, self-pride and respect, and their opportunity to “win." This comprehensive approach advances academic achievement, fosters pro-social skills, and encourages problem solving and concepts of self-help. These critical components will lead to youth who are better educated, have more positive attitudes and increased confidence, demonstrate personal ethics, initiative, and perseverance, and have respect for themselves and others. As a result, youth are less likely to engage in delinquent behavior and criminal activity.

Project Youth Y.E.S. bridges youth, community leaders, and social organization to deliver a comprehensive approach to meeting the cognitive and emotional needs of youth. Youth are encouraged to become actively involved in the planning, development, and implementation of the program which gives them a sense of ownership and investment. Project YES provides year-round programming, is outcomes-driven, places a priority on academic achievement and emotional intelligence, and incorporates case management to ensure the program is individualized.

Youth meet twice per week afterschool for scheduled programming and one weekend per month for an outing. During this time, youth and staff collaborate to discuss subject material for enrichment workshops, and social action projects. During the summer, they meet daily in the form of summer programming. Because we believe that youth are valued, change agents with the power and knowledge to make responsible decisions, they are used as vital partners in the planning, implementation, and evaluation process.

The program components include service-learning, entrepreneurial education, leadership development, violence prevention, life skills, technology education, creative and performing arts, and academic support.

Executive Director, Connie Bobo, has over twenty years of experience in child and youth services. With a very diverse background including non-profit management, education, social work, and program development, she has assisted with the start-up, expansion, and enhancement of multiple programs and wrote curriculum for each. She attended Florissant Valley Community College majoring in Early Childhood Education and furthered her education at Columbia College majoring in Human Services. She completed her Bachelor's Degree in Corporate Communications at Lindenwood University and is enrolled in Lindenwood's Master of Science in Nonprofit Administration. She is certified as a Missouri Accreditation Review Team Leader and Technical Assistant for quality assurance in preschool and afterschool programs as well as a certified substitute teacher, tutor, center director, and trainer in the state of Missouri. She has participated in the St. Louis for Kids Quality Initiative, Children's Defense Fund National Freedom Schools Training, Parents as Teachers National Training Institute, and STARS and CASA training for supporting emotionally disturbed adolescents.
Ms Bobo has extensive experience serving high-risk youth, particularly middle school youth- an underserved population. For three years, she served as an Adolescent Specialist for St Vincent Home and School working directly with girls and boys ages 10-18 in a residential treatment facility. During this time, she co-facilitated group sessions, group therapy, and coordinated and implemented activities for these youth. She also served as a court appointed special advocate for a family of four between fourth and eighth grade, and a visiting resource for a male juvenile with sexual behaviors in the state's custody. Since the founding of R Spencer Schools, Ms Bobo and program volunteers have provided an at-risk afterschool program and summer enrichment program for adolescents. The afterschool program offers life skill development, college and career development, recreation, academic support, violence prevention, and health and wellness.
Compliance and Accountability
The Program Manager is responsible for completing a monthly report that tracks outcomes, numbers served, expenditures, trainings, and member hours to ensure contract compliance and program integrity. We also have Quarterly Integrity Meetings to review the program, policies, and funding.

With only a short six-year history, New Heights CRC has established itself as an innovator and champion for youth development. In 2013, the school-aged programs were registered as a fictitious name with a separate tax identification number under New Heights CRC to distinguish it from the early childhood programs. Since its inception, it has not only served youth registered for its specific programs, but it has provided professional development seminars for youth practitioners and assisted with program design and implementation for other nonprofit youth serving organizations. Its achievements include:
• Co-hosting a Back to School: No Bullying Concert which served 85 children (127 people total)
• Hosted a Feed the Children event where 712 boxes of food, household items, and self-care products were donated to needed families
• Awarded financial support from St Louis Philanthropic Organization, Peabody Energy Corp, and established partnerships with STAR Touring, Feed the Children, and Children's Defense Fund
• Hosting an annual summer food service program for 427 at-risk youth to receive healthy meals during out-of-school time
• Hosting a community book fair where disadvantaged children and youth received a combined total of 512 free books to start a home library
• Receiving an honorary award from Dream BIG Foundation for developing and facilitating a self-awareness curriculum for a group of high-risk youth ages 14-18 living in a residential treatment facility for homeless and runaway youth

Financials

New Heights Community Resource Center
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

New Heights Community Resource Center

Board of directors
as of 7/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Anita Carter- Foley

Retired Educator

Term: 2018 - 2023

Donna Lardge-McGee

Informed Decisions

Christopher Benjamin

City of St Louis

Angelic Clay

Integrity Health Services

Gloria Davis

Edward Jones

Tierra Howard

Centene Corp

Carolyn Lay

Retired Social Worker

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability