Arts, Culture, and Humanities

THE REPRESENTATION PROJECT

Challenging Gender Stereotypes in Media

Mission

The Representation Project (TRP) is the leading gender watchdog organization. Using film and media as catalysts for
 cultural transformation, TRP inspires individuals and communities to challenge limiting gender stereotypes and shift norms. Jennifer Siebel Newsom founded the organization in 2011 in response to the overwhelming public demand for ongoing education and social action in support of her first film, Miss Representation. Since then, TRP released Newsom’s second film, The Mask You Live In, and third film, The Great American Lie. The organization is well known for creating popular social media activism campaigns such as #NotBuyingIt, #AskHerMore, and #RepresentHer. TRP offers robust youth programming giving voice to the next generation of media creators.

Ruling Year

2012

Executive Director

CAROLINE HELDMAN

Main Address

PO Box 1750

Ross, CA 94957 USA

Formerly Known As

Miss Representation

Keywords

gender, stereotypes, cultural transformation, education, youth development, intersectionality, potential, documentary, media, social action

EIN

45-1611066

 Number

3709968686

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (A01)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Rigid gender stereotypes have negative societal outcomes. For girls, gender stereotypes are the root cause of body hatred and shame, eating disorders, depression, low self-esteem, and low leadership ambition. For boys, gender role expectations are the primary driver of depression, risk-taking activities, substance abuse, suicide, and violence. This public health crisis is exacerbated by media aimed at young people who consume an average of 10 hours of media per day. As a driving force in the 21st Century, media can also be leveraged for progressive change. By providing media literacy education and training young people to create their own media, we are empowering the next generation of media makers to create meaningful content with the power to change culture.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

5

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Education

Social Action & Distribution Campaigns

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of students enrolled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Using film and media as catalysts for cultural transformation, The Representation Project inspires individuals and communities to challenge limiting gender stereotypes and shift norms. As a leading gender watchdog, The Representation Project’s programmatic work includes efforts to activate the general public across the US, with a special focus on youth as a powerful generation of cultural influencers who are already using their power as leaders, media makers, and consumers to drive systemic change. The Representation Project is working to achieve the following core objectives: - Expand The Representation Project’s youth programs to train the next generation of underrepresented youth content creators; - Maintain the organization as the “gold standard” for producing gender justice documentaries; and - Continue to be the leading gender watchdog organization by exposing damaging gender stereotypes in ads and other media.

Using film and media as catalysts for cultural transformation, The Representation Project inspires individuals and communities to challenge limiting gender stereotypes and shift norms. Jennifer Siebel Newsom founded The Representation Project in 2011 in response to the overwhelming public demand for ongoing education and social action in support of her first film, Miss Representation. Since then, The Representation Project released Newsom’s second film, The Mask You Live In, and third film, The Great American Lie. The organization is well known for creating popular social media activism campaigns such as #NotBuyingIt, #AskHerMore, and #RepresentHer. The Representation Project offers robust youth programming to the next generation of media creators through school screenings, an online community for creators, summer media training academies, and annual educational summits focused on transcending gender stereotypes.

YOUTH PROGRAMMING: Through our Youth Media Programs, we educate and train youth to gain media literacy and media production skills; use those skills to challenge limiting gender stereotypes in media; and create content that establishes broad, authentic and intersectional representation in media. The organization’s youth programs have had a profound impact on young people’s lives in ways that will shape their future path while strengthening skills that can enhance employment opportunities. GENDER JUSTICE FILMS: Jennifer’s first film, Miss Representation, premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival. It exposed the ways in which mainstream media representations of girls and women contribute to the underrepresentation of women in positions of power and influence. In response to overwhelming public demand for ongoing education and social action in support of the film’s message, Jennifer founded The Representation Project (TRP) in April of 2011. Jennifer's second film, The Mask You Live In, explores how America’s narrow definition of masculinity is harming our boys, men, and society at large. Newsom's third film in the trilogy, The Great American Lie, was released in 2019. It is the most comprehensive intersectional assessment of the causes of economic immobility— racism, corporate exploitation, and gendered societal values. She brings her unique lens to bear on the subject, revealing how inequality is rooted in “masculine” cultural values (e.g., individualism, power, money) at the expense of things we consider “feminine” (e.g., empathy, care, collaboration). Beyond the films, we offer age-appropriate curricula that provides youth with the opportunity to explore and apply the concepts presented in the films. Our tailored curricula are designed to engage youth at different stages of development through hands-on activities and guided discussions. GENDER WATCHDOG & SOCIAL ACTIVISM: TRP has also become the nation’s leading gender watchdog organization through active social media campaigns that hold corporations, content creators, political leaders, and others accountable. On any given week, we reach 2.5 million people worldwide with our messages online, and one in ten engage with our content, by liking, commenting on, or sharing it. Through hosting this large conversation, we provide a platform for our followers to more deeply engage with gender dynamics, tease out the intricacies around intersectionality, and build their skills for bringing these discussions offline. For example, our #AskHerMore campaign around sexist reporting and our #NotBuyingIt campaign around sexist media and advertisements have led to changes everywhere from the red carpet to the Super Bowl to the newsroom. We then amplify the drumbeat of progress by emailing 100,000+ of our constituents simple and specific ways to create change through our “Weekly Actions.”

Youth Programming: -Expand summer Youth Media Academies from two to six locations (two academies in each location: one for girls, one for boys), that will train and empower 180 high school students to produce media that challenges gender stereotypes and other social justice issues. -Through the Academies, film projects will be submitted for screenings at Film Festivals nationwide, which will help further youth opportunities in filmmaking and expand reach of film projects and their messages. -Continue to grow our free, digital Youth Media Lab by 25% annually to reach young people (ages 14 - 24) worldwide and build a community of next generation media makers who are addressing and challenging social justice issues through all forms of media and storytelling. -Educate and engage 1,500+ young people (annually) on media literacy and the power of media production and storytelling to challenge social injustices. -Leverage our annual Youth Media Summit to bring next generation film- and other media makers together around gender and other social justice issues. -Evaluation results (including pre- and post-surveys) will demonstrate increased knowledge on all issue areas, improved self-esteem and leadership opportunities, and greater technical understanding of filmmaking and other media production. Film: -Leverage newest documentary to launch a national conversation about our values as a nation and how issues of economic inequality and social immobility affect all of us, just as Miss Representation did for women’s representation in the media and in positions of leadership and The Mask You Live In did for the boy crisis in America and beyond. -Engage 4,000+ individuals nationwide that demonstrate positive audience feedback on attitudinal and behavioral shifts following the film screening via pre- and post-screenings of the Great American Lie. -Work with national partners to develop and implement a call to action (tentatively framed as “When We All Vote”) that calls for increased voter participation and that encourages dialogue around our shared humanity to decrease our country’s current polarization. -Through screenings of all three films and educational curricula sales, we will continue to broaden our international reach and engage individuals and communities to take action in challenging gender and other social injustices as measured by number of film licenses and copies of curricula sold per year Gender Watchdog & Social Activism: -Over 3 million individuals engaged annually via our digital organizing and social media activism, including a 3% increase year over year. -We will leverage our digital reach through our 100,000 subscribers to our Weekly Action newsletter and social media reach to feature at least 12 public media organizations in our content per year. -With adequate funding, we will partner with the Provincetown Film Festival’s Women’s Media Summit to host an annual Summit in Los Angeles on the state of gender representations in media.

YOUTH PROGRAMS • We trained over 1,000 young content creators in our Youth Media Lab in 2019. • Girls in our Youth Media Academy express greater interest in working in media, engaging in activism, and aspiring to leadership positions. • Over 600 young people have received hands-on training through our annual Youth Summits. They report a substantial increase in their knowledge of the power of storytelling, racial justice issues, and using their creative voice for social change. FILMS/CURRICULA • The Representation Project’s three films, Miss Representation (2011), The Mask You Live In (2015), and The Great American Lie (2019) have been viewed by over 28 million people worldwide. • Our film curricula has been used by over 2.5 million students. SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGNS • The Representation Project has achieved over 1.4 billion impressions through our social media channels. • Our social media hashtag campaigns have reached 834 million people. #NotBuyingIt changed the sexism of Super Bowl ads, and #AskHerMore transformed red carpet interviews so that female celebrities are seen as more than their youth, beauty, and designer dresses.

External Reviews

Financials

THE REPRESENTATION PROJECT

Need more info on this nonprofit?

Need more info on this nonprofit?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

We do not display sexual orientation information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies

close
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
close
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
close
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
close
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
close
We have a diversity committee in place
close
We have a diversity manager in place
close
We have a diversity plan
close
We use other methods to support diversity