PLATINUM2023

Nashville Rescue Mission

Hope Lives Here

aka Nashville Rescue Mission   |   Nashville, TN   |  www.nashvillerescuemission.org

Mission

Providing hope for today, hope for tomorrow, and hope for eternity to the hungry, hurting, and homeless.

Ruling year info

2011

President and CEO

Rev. Glenn Cranfield

Main address

639 Lafayette Street

Nashville, TN 37203 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Nashville Union Rescue Mission

EIN

45-2424130

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Christian (X20)

Travelers' Aid (P61)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homelessness is a growing issue in Nashville. According to the city's Point-In-Time count, 2,000 individuals experienced homelessness in 2020. At that same time, the Mission served more than 6,000 unique individuals. In addition, according to Metro Schools, over 3,000 school-aged children are homeless or do not have permanent housing. Nashville Rescue Mission looks to address this problem in a variety of ways. First, the Mission provides programs and services for those experiencing homelessness to meet their basic and urgent needs, like food, clothing, and shelter. Then, the Mission takes the next step by assigning a case manager to work with a guest to lead them out of their situation and move them into sustainable, independent living. The Mission also offers a long-term life recovery program to help those battling addiction by teaching them new coping strategies to better manage their lives. Different issues require different approaches.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Guest Services Ministries

HOPE FOR TODAY Emergency Services for Men, Women, and Mother’s with Children Meeting basic needs. Right here. Right now. Hope for Today is a hot meal for a hungry child. It is safe shelter for a single woman. It is case management for a homeless man. It is helping men and women in need prepare for employment. At Nashville Rescue Mission, we address homelessness and hopelessness in a way that is transformational and Christ-centered. We believe in order for someone’s heart to be open to change, we must first meet his or her most basic and immediate needs. With over 4,000 homeless individuals living on the streets of Nashville on any given night, Nashville Rescue Mission not only provides temporary assistance to the homeless, but truly gets to the root of the problems that lead to these broken lifestyles in the first place.  Overview of Emergency Services Provided Free of Charge FoodShelterCase Management – provide assistance and referrals for employment, housing, aid, etc.Christian CounselingSecurityDayroom when environmental factors pose a risk (too hot, too cold, rain, snow)Hot Showers & Personal Hygiene Items ProvidedLockersDorm Room3 Hot Nutritious Meals a DayChapel ServiceClothing RoomComputers/InternetCelebrate RecoveryMental HealthBible StudiesJob Search AssistanceLegal Aid – Disability AssistanceVeterans AssistanceSmoking CessationPathways to Work**Worker’s Program**Guest Volunteer ProgramMother’s Room*Bright Spaces*Outdoor Playground* *Women’s Campus **Men’s Campus

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers

Residential Recovery Programs for Men, Women, and Mother’s with Children* (*limit on boys up to age 6)  HOPE FOR TOMORROW Building a new life. Hope for Tomorrow is counseling for a man who is battling addiction. It is caring for a woman who has suffered abuse. It is giving a child a safe place to play while mom gets the help she needs. It is teaching men and women new skills that will equip them for a better future. At Nashville Rescue Mission, we assess each individual’s situation and develop a plan specifically for them that will take them out of the situation they are now in and help them make plans for a better tomorrow. We believe God has a plan and a purpose for every person. The Mission’s program focuses on a person’s entire life—physical, mental, spiritual, emotional, and social. We are committed to restoring the whole person through a Christian approach that helps the homeless and addicted learn how much God loves them and gain the biblical insight they need to lead a productive life in and for Christ.   Overview of Life Recovery Program Services Provided Free of Charge FoodShelterCase Management – provide assistance and referrals for employment, housing, aid, etc.Gateway ProgramIndividual CounselingGroup CounselingDaily DevotionsBible ClassesLife Skills Classes (topics: sexuality, addictions, emotions, strongholds, personal finances, budgeting, Christian manhood, resume preparation, and job interviewing skills)Parenting ClassesWork TherapyHSE Classes (High School Equivalency, formerly GED)Students are in class at least 1 ½ hours a day, 5 days a weekHSE students have an additional 2 hours of class timeClothing RoomLibraryComputer Classes/Computer RoomMusic RoomCDL Classes (optional)Food Handling Classes (optional)Dayroom/TV RoomLaundryBarberFitness RoomPrayer RoomTransitional HousingWorker’s DormSeeds of Hope Garden*Bird and Butterfly Garden* *Women’s Campus **Men’s Campus

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Homeless people

Where we work

Accreditations

Association of Gospel Rescue Missions 1964

Citygate Network 2020

Awards

Certified Best Christian Workplace 2021

Best Christian Workplaces Institute

Affiliations & memberships

Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network 2002

Evangelical Council of Financial Accountability 1988

Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce 2008

Charity Navigator 2009

Giving Matters 2009

Tennessee Christian Chamber of Commerce 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Nomadic people, Adults, Children and youth, Substance abusers

Related Program

Guest Services Ministries

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number of unique individuals who received any housing services.

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Nomadic people

Related Program

Guest Services Ministries

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of individuals who have self-identified as having a mental health diagnosis.

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adults, Substance abusers, Nomadic people

Related Program

Guest Services Ministries

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The average number of unique individuals who receive services at Nashville Rescue Mission each week.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Nomadic people

Related Program

Guest Services Ministries

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The average number of unique individuals who receive any kind of services at Nashville Rescue Mission each month.

Number of service recipients who have no past substance abuse

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Nomadic people

Related Program

Guest Services Ministries

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

The total number of individuals who self-identified as not having a substance abuse disorder.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Mission’s first is to be an Employer of Choice. As an employer of choice, the Mission wants potential and existing employees who genuinely want to work for the organization; it means the Mission seeks to attract and optimize top talent. And its most superior employees choose to stay with the Mission throughout their careers.

The second is to be a Provider of Choice. This means guests and program participants choose the Mission for emergency and recovery care because of the Mission’s integrity, the high quality of its services and facilities, the reputation the Mission has built, and the credibility the Mission has established in the community.

The third is to be a Charity of Choice. This means volunteers and donors choose to support the Mission’s ministry because the Mission is a good steward of the resources they’ve been given; the Mission is well-respected because they fulfill their mission with honor and integrity. And the Mission is highly-visible within the community because they are established experts in what they do.

And fourth is to be a Best Practices Model of Choice. This means that other missions, ministries, and organizations providing recovery and compassionate care to those in need, turn to Nashville Rescue Mission, a proven leader and provider, for instruction and direction in the launch and development of their own ministry, administration, and financial management, emergency services, and recovery programs.

To become an employer of choice, the Mission needs to recruit and retain quality employees capable of delivering on the organization’s mission. The first step was implementing an Employee Engagement Survey through Best Christian Workplaces. This has continued to be a valued resource of information regarding how employees feel about their work and has provided HR with actionable feedback to improve employee engagement. New initiatives include Onboarding, wellness program, hiring bonuses, retention bonuses, new payroll system, supervisor roundtable discussions, compensation studies leading to raises for key positions, to name a few.

To become a provider of choice, the Mission needs to enhance, improve, and maintain current properties, services, and equipment to provide an optimum environment for effective emergency care and recovery services. Strategies included:
A new mandatory background check for volunteers
Replacing telephone and voicemail systems
Moving to a cloud and network-based system
Participating in the Nashville Food Waste Initiative, resulting in hundreds of pounds of high-quality food being donated regularly

Additionally, acquiring new property adjacent to the women’s campus so as to move forward with a campaign to build a new campus for women and children.

Physical updates have included upgrading freight elevators, installing new washers and dryers, replacing water tanks, adding new equipment such as forklifts, pallet jacks, passenger bus and van. The Mission has also improved data collection methods and systems to measure and assess program and ministry impact. This assessment serves as the basis for expanding, discontinuing or adding new services.

Improved case management initiatives have improved the process for welcoming new guests and focusing on their specific needs. Thus, allowing the Mission to help those coming to us for assistance quickly and more effectively.

To become a charity of choice, the Mission has developed a stewardship plan for communicating with donors. Event sponsorship opportunities and major donor gatherings have been implemented to increase loyalty and commitment with individuals and corporations. Robust plans for donor acquisition and retention have been implemented. Cross-channel communication is more powerful as impact stories are utilized across different platforms, including direct mail, newsletters, social channels, and websites. The repetition of the story encourages investment in the story, leading to greater giving. The “I Had No Idea Tour” has become a highly successful way of engaging new and existing donors to learn more about the organization.

To become a best practices model of choice, the Mission has created and implemented various models, including a policy and procedure manual, risk assessment/management strategy program, developing a strategic plan in addition to an operating plan, differentiating between outputs and outcomes, to articulate expected results in each area of ministry.

Nashville Rescue Mission is highly capable of meeting its goals. With a long history, from its inception in 1954, the Mission is a solid, reliable organization with a strong presence in the community.

With frequently surpassing annual fundraising goals, the Mission is poised to focus on improving processes, implementing new initiatives while maintaining the quality of care it’s known for providing.

Fundraising support comes from various channels, giving the organization stability without fear of losing anyone donor and impacting the organization’s ability to operate.

A solid and diverse board of directors provides a depth and breadth of knowledge that the Mission can leverage to its benefit. Operating with solid leadership, the CEO has been at the helm for nearly 11 years.

With a strong brand reputation, the Mission is seen as a well-respected, highly effective organization in the community.

Solid partnerships with external vendors also increase the organization’s ability to meet its short and long-term goals.

Since 1954, Nashville Rescue Mission has served hundreds of thousands of individuals who need help and hope. Some continue to work as employees of the Mission, giving a great testimony to the success these individuals have found through the Mission’s programs and services and their desire to pay it forward. Many of those who have stayed at the Mission have gone on to lead long, productive lives. Whether reconnecting with family or pursuing a new career, we continue to hear stories of success from those who have stayed at the Mission.

In 2020, the Mission served nearly 6,000 unique individuals, of which 277 were children. This accounts for over 424,178 meals served and 212,379 nights of safe shelter provided to those in need.

The Mission also enrolled 196 men and women in its residential life recovery program, with 87 fully completing and graduating from this long-term, 8-month program.

Through case management and other guest services programs, the Mission successfully transitioned 107 men and women from the Mission to independent and stable housing.

The Mission is committed to helping those in need by providing food, clothing, and shelter to those in need and offering case management, life recovery programs, and other services to those looking to better their future. The Mission is continually evaluating its programs and services best to meet the needs of those in the community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Nashville Rescue Mission
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Nashville Rescue Mission

Board of directors
as of 11/13/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. LeEllen Philliops

Ingram Industries

Term: 2022 - 2023

Ann Davis

Retired, Physical Therapist

Chris Milam

Milam Optical Services

James Hiatt

University Professor/Dean

Anvil Nelson

QVS, Inc.

Andrew Jackson

Ghertner and Company

LeEllen Phillips

Ingram Industries

Mike Bishop

Retired, Pharmacist

Gary Cordell

Tennessee Sheriff's Association

Eric Ward

Diane LeBlanc

Renasant Bank

Ben Bonner

Scott Carroll

Echo Power

Mike Baas

Houchens Insurance Group

Dennis Chen

Belmont University

Tahirah King

Mars

Elizabeth Morrison

Tennessee Hospital Association

Ann Murphy

Jennifer Ogden

Brooks Smith

Caroline Smith

Joseph Woodson

Salesforce

Darren Wright

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/7/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.