PLATINUM2023

Villages in Partnership Inc

Changing lives, one village at a time

ALLENTOWN, NJ   |  https://villagesinpartnership.org

Mission

OUR BELIEF is that we can empower people to raise themselves from extreme poverty by coming alongside them as partners to share each other’s burdens, resources, and solutions. OUR MISSION is to build partnerships between villages in the developed world and villages in Malawi to bring about life-changing development for all. OUR METHOD is to work with local development experts in Malawi to implement programs designed to simultaneously address the inter-connected web of root causes of extreme poverty: lack of access to clean water, food insecurity, poor health care, inadequate education, insufficient infrastructure, and lack of economic opportunities. OUR MOTIVATION is to respond to the call of Jesus Christ to love and serve the poor, the hungry, the widowed and the orphaned.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Elisabeth Heinzel-Nelson

Main address

PO BOX 52

ALLENTOWN, NJ 08501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2442802

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

Ambulatory Health Center, Community Clinic (E32)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Malawi is one of the most deeply impoverished countries on earth: - Total population 19.7 million, including 1.3 million orphans; - 10.6% of the adult population is living with HIV/AIDS; - Nationally, the per-person annual gross income is $650; - Almost 50% of the population is moderately or severely underweight; - 85% live as subsistence farmers; - The average age of first-time mothers: 18 years; But these statistics can obscure as much as they reveal. Extreme poverty is more than just numbers; it is hopelessness and despair, living one bad harvest, one illness, one accident away from devastation and death. Although aid groups work in many parts of Malawi, the villages of the Sakata region in the southeast were struggling alone until partnering with VIP. There are a staggering number of orphans and child-led households, widespread hunger and poor nutrition, and desperate need for clean water, adequate medical care, and even rudimentary education.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sakata Project, Zomba Malawi

Our method is to work with local development experts in Malawi to implement programs designed to simultaneously address the inter-connected web of root causes of extreme poverty: lack of access to clean water, food insecurity, poor health care, inadequate education, insufficient infrastructure, and lack of economic opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of water projects built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sakata Project, Zomba Malawi

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Totals reflect the number of Protected Water Sources (deep wells, boreholes, or communal taps) drilled or rehabilitated by VIP each year

Number of animals vaccinated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sakata Project, Zomba Malawi

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of chickens vaccinated against the Newcastle Disease

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sakata Project, Zomba Malawi

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of secondary and university students from rural villages who received academic scholarships

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of Villages in Partnership is to eradicate extreme poverty, beginning in the rural villages of Sakata in Malawi. Extreme poverty is poverty that leads to hopelessness. It is caused by a lack of resources in six critical needs of human development: food, water, education, medical care, infrastructure, and economic opportunity.

Without adequate resources in each of these areas, extreme poverty traps its victims in a vicious cycle that they cannot break out of on their own.VIP seeks to intervene simultaneously in each of these areas to bring about real and sustainable development.

To achieve our mission, VIP works with villagers and local development experts to identify and prioritize needs, then empower local communities to be part of the solutions so that they are able to sustain development. Our process is straightforward and transparent:
- We meet with local leaders and village members to understand their needs, their assets, and their goals;
- We establish Village Implementation Committees (VICs)--made up of elected village members--to set priorities and evaluate projects;
- We mobilize support in the U.S. to provide resources and expertise;
- The entire village works with us to build a solution;
- The project is completed and the villagers take ownership of it;
- The project helps to lift the entire community.

The people of Malawi have the capacity, determination, and desire to improve their lives. What they lack are necessary critical resources, training, and capital. They need outside partners to come alongside them, to provide them with the resources and training necessary to lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

To access these needed resources, VIP has formed partnerships with “villages” in the U.S.: churches, universities, businesses, and families that can provide financial, technical, medical, and training support to address the needs articulated by our Malawi partners. We also raise support and awareness through fundraising events, including our signature annual Water Walk.

This approach has had a significant impact in Malawi. Where clean water is the priority, we help the villages bring in borehole-drilling crews. Where education is the priority, we build schools and seek scholarships. Where food and economic security are the priority we provide goats, organize savings co-ops, and offer training in agricultural and animal husbandry best practices.

- Both 501(c)(3) in the U.S. and N.G.O. status in Malawi;
- A clear mission and shared values;
- Established U.S. funding sources;
- Partnerships with U.S. churches, universities, and businesses that can offer engineering, medical, and financial support to achieve our mission;
- Knowledgeable Malawian staff on-site, year-round, to build trust and collaboration with our partner villages;
- Established collaborative partnerships with 26 Malawi villages in the Sakata region, with community structures for oversite, ownership, and sustainability of projects;
- Partnerships with various Malawi government departments to sustain the development projects we establish. For example, clinics and schools we build are staffed by Malawi practitioners and teachers, paid by the Malawi government.

The seeds that co-founders Liz and Stephen Heinzel-Nelson planted during a year of living and learning in Malawi in 2008 have grown into what is now a vibrant, wide-ranging development organization, involving dozens of people working in partnership with churches, schools, businesses and community organizations to nurture enduring, life-changing relationships with villages in Malawi. In 2011, VIP incorporated and began operating as a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Today we employ more than a dozen full-time Malawian staff members who oversee a range of year-round projects in each of the Six Critical Development Areas.

VIP has completed dozens of projects and programs, large and small, throughout the region of Sakata since 2008, including:
- 78 clean water sources dug or rehabilitated;
- 48 classrooms & teacher houses solarized with electricity;
- 823 farmers trained in sustainable agricultural practices & livestock management;
- 1,232 goats distributed to vulnerable families;
- 3,500+ students supported in preschool, primary, secondary, college, and vocational training;
- 28,788 patients cared for in rural medical clinics;
- $2 million+ invested in sustainable development projects

In 2008, our very first project was to rebuild a small clinic in Kalupe Village. In 2021, we will continue construction on the Khanda Health Center which will have an outpatient department, a maternity ward, and dental & eye units. In addition, we are in the beginning stages of developing a Learning/Demonstration Farm to teach sustainable agricultural practices and serve as a hub for our agricultural and livestock programs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Villages in Partnership Inc
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Villages in Partnership Inc

Board of directors
as of 04/19/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Robert Rhoad

Liz Heinzel-Nelson

Stephen Heinzel-Nelson

Eileen Gradwell

Tim Schuler

Randa Nelson

Thomas Marrero

Lucy Goeke

Chris Ebling

Tim Golden

David Shipman

Greg Herceg

Jackie Dyer

Gayle Anderson

Jennie Garst

Elizabeth Yates

Marissa Cano

David Specca

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/23/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data