ZIMBABWE MEDICAL PROJECT

Partnering in medical care and education in Africa

Knoxville, TN   |  https://www.zimproject.org

Mission

To partner in the prevention and treatment of illnesses and conditions that devastate families in Zimbabwe - including preventable blindness, nutritional deficencies and waterborne illnesses To partner in the education of Zimbabwean medical caregivers (nurses, medical students, medical residents, hospital medical officers community doctors and specialists)

Ruling year info

2012

MD

Dr Phil Mitchell

Main address

3020 Keller Bend Rd

Knoxville, TN 37922 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2482119

NTEE code info

Eye Diseases, Blindness and Vision Impairments (G41)

Surgery (G9B)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sustainable long term expansion of healthcare capacity that address three main areas of focus: 1. Medical Care for endemic, preventable clinical diseases that ravage rural working families. Malnutrition and vitamin deficiency Early access to medical providers trained in trauma care Preventable blindness and access to vision restoring surgery 2. Medical Education and training of nurses, physicians and rural health workers 3. Rural communities struggling to provide clean water and food for their families

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Eye Partnership in preventing, diagnosing and treating preventable blindness

Clinical partnership aimed at addressing the epidemic of preventable blindness in Zimbabwe. We are expanding the clinical care of the patient with eye diseases by increasing capacity and quality. We are helping in one on one education of the chain of healthcare providers from rural clinic nurses to trainee eye surgeons.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Children and youth

We intervened to help provide supplemental nutrition during the most recent drought induced famine in Zimbabwe. We are now working to help provide seed assistance to individual rural families to allow them to establish enduring food supplies and vegetable seeds to help prevent Vitamin A deficiency blindness

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

In 2015 a US and SA partnership of ATLS and ATCN Instructors trained a Zimbabwe team of Trauma (ATCN) Instructors that have to date trained a total of 139 internationally accredited Advanced trauma nurses from hospitals and clinics all over Zimbabwe. In 2018 a training team from teUniversity of Tennessee partnered with ATLS (Advanced Trauma Life Support) South Africa in the first promulgation of trauma physician ATLS program in Central Africa.

Population(s) Served
People with diseases and illnesses
Emergency responders

We have partnering with local and international groups to rebuild and raise the wall of a breached earthen dam in a remote rural area of Matabeleland South. The project has established a clean water facility to supply local villagers and establishment of a gravity fed irrigation system to supply agricultural fields below the dam is nearing completion.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Children and youth

In Partenership with Rotary International, Rotary Club of Morrisville Vitamin Angels and Wild4Life we have been able to supply supplemental Vitamin A to the children of Matabeleland North and Binga District.
A total of 51000 children between the ages of 6 months and 59 months will receive scheduled Vitamin A supplememtation in rural clinics to prevent blindness from endeminc Vitamin A deficiency.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children receiving medical services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Eye Partnership in preventing, diagnosing and treating preventable blindness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders

Related Program

Advanced Trauma training for nurses and physicians

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of hours of training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders

Related Program

Advanced Trauma training for nurses and physicians

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Trauma training for class of 16 nurses

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Medical Care:
Preventable blindness and access to vision restoring surgery:
Pairing teaching surgeons of excellence with surgeons in training whilst promoting exchange of skills and providing care to indigent patients

Malnutrition and vitamin deficiency:
Partnering to provide supplemental vitamins and food to children under the age of 12 years in rural areas of
Zimbabwe during food emergencies

Early access to providers trained in trauma care : Establishment and expansion of the first Central African Advanced Trauma Training
Program and Trauma library. Zimbabwe now boasts an internationally qualified ATLS Instructor team of Zimbabweas nurses and
doctors trained in Advanced Care of the Trauma patient

Medical Education: Partnering with organizations of excellence in the US, South Africa and Zimbabwe to help train Zimbabwe nurses
and physicians to the highest levels of internationally recognized care. We specifically focus on building teams of excellence that
will continue to grow and expand medical training programs.

Partnering with leading medical teaching centers from the United States and South Africa to provide the best in medical education to
Zimbabwean health care givers. Our programs emphasize training of Zimbawean nurses and physicians to the level of
internationally trained instructors.

Rural communities struggling to provide clean water and food for their families: Partnering to expand clean water access and
agricultural capacity via dams and irrigation to rural Zimbabweans

Identifying and building partnerships between clinicians and educators of excellence from Zimbabwe, US and South Africa,


Using established personal and professional partnerships to fuel healthcare expansion in Zimbabwe and Central Africa


Partnering with gifted, motivated Zimbabwean clinicians and educators and community leaders to identify sustainable, scaleable projects
with the greatest long term impact on families and communities.

Using post project analysis to guide future successful project planning and execution

Using our growing network of of talent and experience to identify partnerships and projects that will provide the absolute highest return on invested effort, measured in sustainable increases in quality of life for individuals and families

Our Board comprises 6 individuals with a mutual love and respect for Zimbabwe and its people

They represent the best in the fields of medicine, education and philanthropy. Their diverse set of talents and backgrounds (three Directors from Zimbabwe and three Directors from the US) have enabled us to overcome the multiple challenges that arise whilst completing our projects in developing nations.

Our field partners are of extraordinary quality and drive. We are proud to include, in our network, partnerships with both Zimbabwean and international organizations specializing in medicine and education. Each successful project has enabled us to build and extend those networks and allow us to work with the very highest quality personnel to manage and complete our projects

See website for details

Education of rural midwives providing care to rural maternity centers

Establishment of the Zimbabwe ATLS Trauma Education Program for physicians and nurses and inauguration of the Nurses Training School in Bulawayo

Training to date of more than 170 internationally certified Trauma Nurses

Establishment of a National Trauma Library with online access to WHO HINARI medical literature (see website for details) and online cataloging

Training of trainee Zimbabwean eye surgeons in surgical techniques of Small Incision Eye surgery

Partnering in teaching of Pathology, Radiology and Pharmacology between NUST Medical School and universities in South Africa and the US

Surgical treatment and cure of preventable blindness in rural villagers in partnership with the surgeons of the Himalayan Eye Project

Vitamin A supplementation to 410000 children annually between the ages of 6 and 59 months in rural Zimbabwe

Rebuilding and enhancement of capacity of a breached dam and establishment of an irrigation scheme and clean water for a rural village community in Zimbabwe

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Kesari Dam villagers and tribespeople engaged in use of irrigation fresh water or upkeep of dam Nurses and doctors participating in trauma and obstetric training including trainee residents and trainee nurses Rural Clinic Nurses involved in food distribution to children Rural Clinic Nurses involved in Vitamin and antibiotic administration to villagers

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Vitamin A distribution status was most effective when combined with childhood vaccination visits Suggestions for addition of mannequins for management of airway trauma and for abdominal trauma greatly increased the effectiveness of trauma training Water from the new Kesari Dam was made available for brick manufacture near the dam where the community were helping rebuild their rural clinic

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have long noted that our most powerful tool in maintaining continuity is for the community we serve to take ownership from the first day of projects. Requesting and acting on feedback is a powerful way to reinforce this community ownership

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

ZIMBABWE MEDICAL PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ZIMBABWE MEDICAL PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 6/10/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr Phillip Mitchell


Board co-chair

Ms Amy Madigan

King and Spalding

Term: 2017 - 2022

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/19/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.