Human Impacts Institute

We're making climate action personal.

Brooklyn, NY   |  http://www.humanimpactsinstitute.org

Mission

We are building a global cultural movement that’s inspiring big, bold, and beautiful climate action. We connect people to science-based, community-driven solutions through arts and culture. We inspire climate action by amplifying new voices of leadership, sharing resources for resilience, and creating innovative ways to come together to ensure environmental and social justice in our communities. We are connectors. Our international network includes creatives, educators, activists and policy experts. We work in city streets, schools, galleries, and museums, bringing people together to promote equitable solutions in positive and creative ways.

Ruling year info

2015

Founder and Executive Director

Tara DePorte

Main address

312 South Third Street, Apt 7

Brooklyn, NY 11211 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2589652

NTEE code info

Environmental Beautification (C50)

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2020 and 2019.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mission: We are building a global cultural movement that’s inspiring big, bold, and beautiful climate action. Vision: We exist to help you take action. We envision a world in which each one of us is an active agent of social and environmental change. Where culture and nature converge, not compete. Where our communities have equal access to resources needed for dignity, happiness and health. Theory of Change: Climate change is complex and often overwhelming. We know that caring about something doesn’t necessarily lead us to meaningful impact. We make action personal by highlighting new voices of leadership, connecting you to solutions in engaging ways, and welcoming you to a diverse, creative community that is addressing the root causes of the climate crisis.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Creative Climate Awards

The Creative Climate Awards (CCAs) are annual global competition and festival, the awards showcase artists creating climate-inspired work that raises public awareness and sparks action.

In an effort to inspire people to think more critically about our actions and their impacts, the CCAs use creativity to broaden the climate conversation, inspire action, and to combine art and education with diverse climate themes.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Families
Artists and performers
Activists

Our Human Impact Salons invite a local view on global issues by bringing together unlikely allies to investigate tough topics in creative and engaging ways through conversation, performance, and public engagement.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Academics
Activists
Artists and performers

People inspire us everyday with their words, their actions, and their stories. Our Impact Stories share personal tales of innovation and impact through multidisciplinary, interactive exhibits and installations. Past series have included climate leaders from the global south, women, youth, and indigenous, as well as local innovators from activism to academia to government.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Women and girls
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Our fellowships support artists, researchers, and community-based initiatives that connect people to environmental solutions. Past fellowships have included Impact Artists, Environmental Health, and Youth & Artivism, among others.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Activists
Artists and performers
Economically disadvantaged people

Our workshops develop leadership skills while learning to give back to the planet and community and include:

Trees and Tutus
Our HII crew and volunteers plant gardens, clean up, and care for local green spaces. In the process, we beautify local neighborhoods, mitigate air pollution, and prevent stormwater runoff.

Youth Leadership Intensives
We offer virtual and in-person year-round youth leadership trainings that combine mentorship and hands-on learning. These experiences teach youth of all ages about local social and environmental justice issues, activism strategies, scientific communication, and community engagement.

Customized Educational Experiences
We understand no two groups are the same and neither are our workshops. We work with you, your school, company or community to create solutions-centered, STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) learning experiences. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of key global issues through action-based learning.

Population(s) Served

Our Urban Environmental Health Lab (UEHL) is a community hub for health experts and local artists. These health and art fellows are brought together to build resilience to environmental health threats and creatively connect communities to equitable pollution prevention tools. UEHL programs include virtual and in-person workshops and trainings, access to free soil and water quality testing, and interactive exhibits that further understanding of local environmental health risks. UEHL seeks to connect people with the tools and actions vital to increase public health equity, environmental justice, and safety.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Activists
Adults
Children and youth
Activists
Artists and performers
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Children and youth
Activists
Artists and performers
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Children and youth
Activists
Artists and performers
Ethnic and racial groups

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Note: In 2020 we did large public installations in very public spaces, which had a large amount of traffic and visibility (i.e. Times Square and Glasgow Contemporary Art Museum).

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total value ($$) of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

NOTE: All values are in $$ equivalents of volunteer hours contributed to the organization.

Total Value ($$) of Donated Goods and Services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of works exhibited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Note: This is total number of ARTISTS exhibited not works (some artists had multiple works). Additionally, the number for 2014 is an agregate of 2011-2014 as we don't have the annual data.

Total number of artist submissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

For years with very low numbers, we did not have an open call (i.e. 2020) but instead had guest curators select from their network of artists for exhibits. Lastly, the number for 2014 is 2011-2014.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

A Message from our Founder

We all want happiness, health, and dignity for ourselves and our loved ones. We all need clean food, air, water, and shelter to survive. But the reality is that we live in a world where the majority of people don’t have the means to thrive. Our systems are broken. There is a disconnect between society and nature and we are seeing the impacts of that disconnect today.

I’ve always been driven by curiosity and a sense of responsibility. The curiosity stems from being in awe of our planet and our diverse cultures. The responsibility stems from the privilege I have experienced walking through life as a white, middle-class woman; I have rarely feared for my life; I have always been able to drink the water from our tap; and I have never been worried about whether or not I can feed my child. With these immense privileges comes immense responsibility. This responsibility is exciting and is also a big part of why I commit every day to the work we do.

I founded the Human Impacts Institute to serve as a home for experimenting with how we can be creative in building a more just future. We are a community that connects you to the leadership and action we need to protect and prepare our communities for climate impacts. We create spaces to bring new voices into the room — women, youth, frontline, BIPOC and others — and we amplify their personal stories and actions. And we are a home for bringing together people to realize the beauty that is possible. Imagine a world without trash, where there are no children with asthma, and where every community has access to greenspace AND a living wage. That is the world we are building with your help.

The climate crisis is one of the biggest challenges we have ever faced as humanity. And it is our generation that will decide the fate of many to come. We can only rise to this challenge by addressing the root causes of the climate crisis and by doing it together through big and bold action. This is why we need to get creative on how we build our movement and create space for more people to join in meaningful and impactful ways.
I’m amazed and humbled by how far we’ve come. There’s a lot more to be done. Thank you for joining us.

Warmly,
Tara DePorte
Founder and Executive Director
Human Impacts Institute

How: We connect people to science-based, community-driven solutions through arts and culture. We inspire climate action by amplifying new voices of leadership, sharing resources for resilience, and creating innovative ways to come together to ensure environmental and social justice in our communities.

Storytelling: Amplifying extraordinary voices of leadership and innovation through personal stories.

Exhibits:Celebrating creative approaches to communicating and engaging people in the future we want to build.

Education:Developing leadership skills and tools for resiliency through hands-on learning, mentorship and community service.

Conversation: Exploring local solutions with diverse audiences in inspiring settings.

Community: We are connectors. Our international network includes creatives, educators, activists and policy experts. We work in city streets, schools, galleries, and museums, bringing people together to promote equitable solutions in positive and creative ways.

We are creatives, educators, activists, and diverse experts committed to promoting action-oriented, innovative approaches to social and environmental justice. Our organization was founded in NYC in 2011 and has since expanded to bring creative engagement programs that spark climate action to communities across the globe.

Our staff leadership have over 20 years of experience in climate and public engagement and are composed of climate, communications, and education experts, as well as creatives. Our advisory council is reflective of all aspects of our programs, including global leaders in climate science, communications, frontline communities, education, advocacy, policy, and youth leadership. And our board and diversity of volunteers are comprised of business leaders, community experts, and specialists in implementation and evaluation.

Our organizational network is global and diverse, including long-term, programmatic partnerships with multiple national governments (Germany, Taiwan, France, the United Nations, etc), universities (New School, University of Aix-Marseille, Columbia University, etc), leading institutions (NYC Parks Department, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, IMéRA, Ville de Marseille, Brooklyn Public Library, etc), businesses, and local organizations.

Finally, we recruit, train, and work with interns from around the globe, having provided nearly 20,000 hours of youth leadership training. This brings new approaches and international perspective to our programs on a semester basis, ensuring that we are both accountable to the next generation and working to support them as leaders.

We have build an international organization that was one of the first to use arts and culture as a way to engage diverse publics in climate action.

Since 2011, we have engaged more than 318,000 participants from around the globe through 661 educational events and 24,510 hours of educational programs.

We have also exhibited over 250 artists from 35 different countries, who are all working on creatively engaging communities in climate action.

But the biggest accomplishments are not in the numbers, they are in the community that we have built that brings together policymakers from the highest levels of international policy with activists, youth, and artists from around the world. The greatest accomplishments that we have seen are that we are both supporting and amplifying the under-recognized voices of on-the-ground climate action through means that will ensure long-term change.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Yes. We serve a diverse population of people who care about environmental and social justice issues or are leaders in climate justice action. Some programs target youth, some urban professionals, and some frontline BIPOC leaders in the Global South. Each program is tailored to our participants and leads with an inquiry on participant needs and goals.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recent participants in an exhibit had requested more ways to engage with the audience and share their work. We are currently redesigning the program for a next series of funding to have touch-points for participants to exchange with audience members in-person and virtually.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Human Impacts Institute
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Human Impacts Institute

Board of directors
as of 07/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sarangi Iyengar

Deutsche Bank

Lisa Jaycox

Trinity Wall Street

Chiara Jovanovic

New Playbook

Julien Saur

Boston Consulting Group

Chigusa Hara

Financial Services

Doug Semmes

Drum Roll Composter

Wendy Star

FDNY

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/26/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.