PLATINUM2023

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii

Clean Beaches Start at Home

Mission

Inspiring communities to care for their coastlines.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Rafael Bergstrom

Main address

3160 Waialae Ave Suite 120

HONOLULU, HI 96816 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2596726

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii (SCH) inspires local communities to care for their coastlines. SCH is working on one of the largest environmental and social crises of our time – the epidemic of plastic pollution that already exists on our coastlines and marine ecosystems and continues to grow. Our organization is the Hawaii and global leader in cleaning up the plastic that washes ashore and activating citizens to stop the pollution at its source. According to the United Nations, since the 1950s, the production of plastic has outpaced that of almost every other material and by 2050 plastic production will occupy 20% of global fossil fuel use. Issues associated with plastic pollution range from concerns over human health, to climate change, to financial loss, to environmental damage. Recent studies indicate that humans are ingesting a credit cards worth of plastics every week due to the perpetual presence of plastic particles in water and air.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Large Scale Cleanup

SCH hosts beach cleanup and restoration festivals that bring the community together around the solutions to plastic pollution. Each cleanup gives volunteers the opportunity to get their hands in the sand to clean their beaches. SCH uses cleanups as an interactive learning tool to connect the community to more proactive solutions to plastic pollution with a message that we envision a world where we no longer have to clean up our beaches.

Population(s) Served

Through immersive and fun hands-on experiences, we empower participants from Keiki to KUPUNA (youth to elders) to take action and care for coastlines with a sense of kuleana (responsibility), curiosity, and creativity. We work in classrooms, on location at our experience-based learning centers, and online to connect with all of Island Earth.

Population(s) Served

Waste is a valuable resource. We are changing how waste is dealt with in Hawaiʻi. Waste Diversion prevents waste from entering our landfills and transforms it into a resource through composting and creating soil. Be a leader in the zero waste movement.

Since 2012, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaiʻi has been working with diverse clients to make environmentally conscious choices when planning events, diverting waste all while educating and inspiring guests in the process. Hosting a zero-waste or sustainable event can be simple and rewarding. We are available for hire to help you minimize your events impact on the environment through pre-event consulting and during event implementation of our waste diversion systems and trained resource management/education staff.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total pounds of debris collected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Native Hawaiians, Multiracial people, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Large Scale Cleanup

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

SCH is always happy to clean beaches. While we celebrate the amount that we clean as positive, we envision a future where cleanups are not necessary because we have implemented preventative work.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SCH wants to turn off the tap on plastic pollution while building a community that maintains a clean and accessible coastline. Turning off the tap means helping all people of Hawaii and the world understand that solutions lie in changing our behavior and not just cleaning up the mess we create as a global community. Our organization uses large scale cleanups as an educational tool to inspire this behavior change that protects our islands and serves as a model for island Earth. A sustainable coastline is one that is free from trash including plastics, derelict fishing gear, and other debris that can harm people and wildlife alike. Each of our large-scale coastal cleanups regularly host hundreds of volunteers while our outreach/education programs reach over 30,000 individuals annually. Participating in a SCH cleanup leads to behavioral changes aimed at improving the quality of our coastlines. Ultimately we want Hawaii to be net-zero plastic and become an example for the world on resilience and sustainability.

Beach Cleanups: We host large scale coastal cleanups that are unique in that they make community service fun, energizing thousands of volunteers to participate through a festival atmosphere with educational and cultural value conveyed throughout. As more people visually experience plastic pollution, they begin to realize the importance of everyday actions as meaningful mechanisms of positive change. Whether it’s someone who regularly walks the coastlines of Hawaii, or someone who lives in the back of a valley, or a visitor from a land locked state, the collective effect is knowing that each of us are a part of the consumer culture that produces this pollution and thus we are all where the solutions begin. Testimonials from first time volunteers echo this sentiment; hundreds of individuals reach out through email, phone calls, and social media to describe how our programs changed their behavior.

Innovative Education & Outreach: SCH’s mobile Education Station is a converted van that opens up into a mobile classroom. It is used to conduct educational outreach in schools, community groups, businesses and even government facilities targeting thousands of students and community members. The education station is designed to get students out of the classroom to engage in games, hands-on demonstrations, and an immersive experience that bends traditional methods of teaching. While historically our efforts in education and outreach have focused in on plastic pollution, we understand a stark reality that our coastlines are in jeopardy of the impacts of climate change and sea level rise. Our next step in our outreach curriculum will draw the connections from the fossil fuel use in the plastic industry and consumer consumption to the impending threats of climate change.

Event Greening & Reuse: Our waste diversion program takes aim at events and inspires businesses to reduce their impacts on landfills and the incinerator by separating compost and recyclables from the waste stream. This service is highlighted by serving at key events like the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing which also meets educational goals as we reach local and global communities. Our Ocean Plastics Program works with brands to repurpose the plastic debris we find into products. The focus on reuse of discarded items is one of the pivotal points to effective waste management after refusing and reducing. In 2019/20 we aim to bring this whole program in house to Hawaii versus sending the debris to the mainland to be processed. This will create jobs and opportunities for Hawaii and also serve as a model to be expanded elsewhere in the world.

SCH has proven to be the community leader in beach cleanups and marine debris education over the past 9 years. No other organization has united as many communities around the issue of plastic pollution and brought together more volunteers than SCH. Given our success in this field we have developed the strongest core team of volunteers and small group of employees to meet our goals. From our board members, to the executive director, to the operations and waste diversion managers, education director, & media manager, we have a collection of scientists, business savvy members, experienced volunteers in waste management, and community organizers with years of experience in the field. Since our inception in 2011 we’ve brought together over 35,000 volunteers to remove 512,138 pounds of debris from Hawaii’s coastlines and educated over 40,000 students about plastic pollution and coastal stewardship. SCH cleanups are like no other, not only in terms of size but also in terms of community collaboration. Each large-scale cleanup includes a large multifaceted contingent of community organizers, organizations, schools, community groups, and local government. In order to reach a wider range of people, instead of “preaching to the choir”, we include live entertainment, food, guest speakers, treasure hunts, and giveaways.

In 2011 when SCH began with a small group of volunteers and a goal to clean a single beach that year, Makapuu, 150 volunteers removed almost a ton of debris from the beach. That day inspired a movement to grow and SCH to take on the challenge of an ever-increasing load of debris arriving on our shores with every high tide. In 2018, the growth and impact of the organization reached new heights. On Earth Day 2018 we executed our largest cleanup to date by bringing together 1,548 volunteers to cleanup 4 miles of coastline and remove 7,000 pounds of trash. In total our cleanups have removed over half a million lbs of debris, covering over 100 miles of coastline. More important than the debris was the level of engagement in our mission each year, as 5000 volunteers join the cleanups, more than 10,000 students engaged directly with classroom presentations, and we reach thousands more by participating in over 75 community events throughout the year. On the community level in places like Molokai, SCH has become a name associated with giving back and empowering community to work on the issues from the ground up. Our event greening has worked with the WSL, Wanderlust, Howard Hughes, the Biennial and a growing list of partners to divert on average 70% of waste away from linear disposal methods (landfill/incinerator). Additionally, our social media following doubled in the last year, surging from 40,000 followers to 100,000 across our platforms. These results are not trivial; In the last year the stories of Hawaii plastic pollution have reached global audiences with coverage in National Geographic, 60 Minutes, and most recently with Jason Mamoa highlighting the work of SCH on the Ellen show.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii

Board of directors
as of 06/14/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jack Kittinger

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data