BOOK HARVEST

Books for every child. Support for every parent. Literacy for every community.

Durham, NC   |  www.bookharvest.org

Mission

OUR MISSION Book Harvest provides an abundance of books and ongoing literacy support to families and their children from birth and serves as a model for communities committed to ensuring that children are lifelong readers and learners. OUR VISION Our vision is of a world in which reading, learning, and access to information are considered rights, not privileges, so that all children thrive. Learn more at www.bookharvest.org To Donate go to: https://bookharvest.org/donate/

Notes from the nonprofit

Books for every child. Support for every parent. Literacy for every community.

Ruling year info

2011

Founder and CEO

Ginger Young

Main address

2501 University Drive, Suite 6b

Durham, NC 27707 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2610533

NTEE code info

Remedial Reading, Reading Encouragement (B92)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The literacy crisis in the United States exacts a stark, inequitable toll on children of color and children growing up in poverty. As early as 18 months, low-income children show evidence of falling behind in vocabulary development and other skills vital for school readiness. In a 2009 study, children in middle-income families engaged in 1,000 to 1,700 hours of picture book reading with an adult over the course of their childhood; for children in low-income families, that number was just 25 hours. Not surprisingly, as this stark gap would suggest, children in low-income homes lack books in their home, while their higher-income peers typically grow up in the presence of books. When children growing up in or near poverty arrive at kindergarten, they are already 12-14 months behind their higher-income peers; just 48% of children from low-income homes in America are kindergarten-ready at age five, compared to 75% of children from families with moderate and high income.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Book Babies

An established Book Harvest program since 2013, Book Babies partners with families of Medicaid-eligible children to develop their child’s early language and literacy skills. An evidence-informed program that begins when a baby is born and is sustained over five years, Book Babies provides parents with quarterly literacy coaching sessions and 100+ age-appropriate and language-appropriate books.

Book Babies offers families a wide array of information and resources to develop the foundation for their children’s early language and literacy development, essential for school readiness and school success; these include literacy kits at each literacy coaching session starting at age two and a half, to support the development of dialogic reading, phonological awareness, and emergent writing; and a children’s savings account toward college or career for every enrolled child.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

An established Book Harvest program since 2012, Book Harvest's Books on Break program invites elementary school students to choose their very own, brand new, culturally diverse books to take and keep forever at the start of every summer break. The joy and engagement students experience help to build their home libraries, cultivate rich home literacy environments with their parents and families, and preserve the learning gains they have made over the academic year.

Each year, Books on Break partners with elementary schools and runs free book fairs in media centers. Choice and and quantity are key, as students harvest up to 10 books each to read over the summer and keep forever. They take their books home in special string backpacks pre-loaded with information for their families about literacy-rich summer activities in their community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Book Harvest's Family Space is a playful learning hub where children and their families can freely discover an abundance of books, toys, and manipulatives that spark learning opportunities and cross-generational communication, creativity, and collaboration.

Why? Playful learning is a pedagogical approach that features child-directed play methods that are a unique way to foster learning and engagement. Embedding learning opportunities in places where families regularly go creates public spaces that foster learning, bring people together, and generate a sense of community pride.

Families are welcome to visit Book Harvest's Family Space during any of its operating hours. The space includes storytime and performance areas, magnet letters and words, conversation prompts, right-sized furnishings, active math games for early number skills, hands-on activities that draw from best-in-class STEM and language arts curricula, and an abundance of free books to take home and keep forever.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Book Harvest's Laundromat Literacy initiative was started in 2018 and is an innovative partnership with community laundromats devoted to transforming the idle time families spend regularly into content-rich, activity-filled, literacy-enhancing experiences. Part of a national movement to optimize learning everywhere families frequent, Laundromat Literacy engages children and families while their laundry spins and fosters language development and book ownership.

Book Harvest partners with community laundromat owners to maintain cozy reading corners in laundromats, each filled with with special furniture and activity centers to encourage parent-child reading and literacy activities, and a bookshelf with an abundance of high-quality, culturally diverse, and bilingual books free for the taking. A Book Harvest staff person replenishes the bookshelf regularly. Storytimes are also held to engage children in language-rich activities and that model reading behaviors for parents.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Book Harvest's Pre-K/K Transition Services support families in selecting high-quality Pre-K and kindergarten programs for their children. Partnering with families, Book Harvest's bilingual Transition Coach provides individualized navigation through the often-complicated application and selection process and helps to ensure that children are enrolled in programs best suited for each child and family.

The Transition Coach helps to remove the roadblocks families often face as their children prepare to enter formal school settings. The coach works primarily with families enrolled in Book Harvest's Book Babies program over the course of two years with in-person and/or virtual visits, providing information sessions with local programs and schools, all-inclusive support with the application and enrollment process, and family advocacy training sessions. Book Harvest's unique Ready for School Guide is a resource for these families, as well as for childcare centers working with families.

Population(s) Served

Book Harvest's Book Boxes are colorful, outdoor book access hubs placed in community settings that families frequent. In close collaboration with many community partners -- child care centers, public parks and recreations centers, faith communities, social service agencies, health clinics and schools among them -- Book Boxes are filled with dozens of books for children of all ages to take home and build their own home libraries.

Working with organizations and businesses that are frequently visited in neighborhoods where resources are limited, Book Harvest team members build and install these colorful book access hubs for children and regularly replenish the stock of books for children of all ages. Families are not expected to replace the books they take; rather, they are invited to take books home and keep them forever, building home libraries to enhance their literacy skills and their love for reading.

Book Boxes began popping up in 2021; as of 2022, 14 boxes are installed.

Population(s) Served

Stared in 2022, Book Harvest's Classroom Libraries program is a partnership with kindergarten through fifth grade teachers in participating public schools designed to provide 100+ brand new books for their classrooms. The program supports teachers in creating a nurturing a culture of reading excitement and engagement with books that are brand new, high-interest, inclusive, and culturally relevant.

Book Harvest partners with public schools and districts to select, purchase, and deliver books to replenish classroom collections of books that students can access throughout the school year. The titles are carefully selected by the Book Harvest team to ensure that they are high quality, age- and developmentally appropriate, and culturally inclusive to ignite the imaginations and empathy of young readers.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Infants and toddlers
Infants and toddlers

Where we work

Awards

Literacy Award 2020

Library of Congress

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Average dollars given by each individual new donors.

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community events, webinars, trainings. Book Harvest currently has two large community events p/year: Dream Big Book Drive and the Summer Block Party. These hosted a combined total of 3k ppl in 2022.

Number of distribution outlets for products

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Numbers include Book Harvest access hubs including Book Boxes, partner locations, schools, community events, and third party events.

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of first time individual donors.

Number of new organizations signing on as collaborators

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The 2020 number reflects the changes brought by the COVID pandemic.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of affiliates speaking at conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of books distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2022 as of October 2022: 196,988 TOTAL as of October 2022: 1,874,673

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Combined total from our two large community events: Dream Big Book Drive and Summer Block Party.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of subscribers/followers in Mailchimp and all social media accounts.

Number of press releases developed and distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have emerging literacy skills such as beginning letter recognition and phonological awareness, story comprehension, and use of writing materials.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Book Babies

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers reflect the number of active child participants in our Book Babies program.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Book Harvest, we believe that literacy begins at birth, in the home, with parents. A full 80% of all brain development takes place in the first three years of life – and yet, our country has failed to provide sufficient systems and support to take advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. We must nourish this fertile moment and set the path for every child on a trajectory of flourishing and success – in school and in life.

Now more than ever before, Book Harvest is ready to respond to the clarion call of need in our home state of North Carolina and beyond. We are in a unique position to protect and preserve our future by equipping our next generation with the essential tools and resources for literacy. Book Harvest plans to enable every child in North Carolina -- and the country -- regardless of race or family income, to:​

● start school kindergarten-ready;
● read at grade level​ in third grade and beyond; and
● develop a lifelong love of reading and learning.​

Solving any challenge our society faces begins with the foundation of a literate populace. Whatever issue one cares about – from national security to social mobility, from voting rights to housing, from health care to food security - literacy is where it starts. And we at Book Harvest believe that we know how to get there.

In 2011, Book Harvest stepped onto the stage of youth education and literacy in our community by staking a claim to the conviction that equitable access to resources for everyone in our community is the key to success and prosperity for every child. This work begins at birth, and Book Harvest applies a razor-sharp focus to the role of parents as powerful change agents. The organization has identified books as easily accessible, cost-effective, evidence-informed tools to open the gateway to success for every child in our midst -- success in school and success in life. Why books? In "The Literacy Crisis: False Claims, Real Solutions," Jeff McQuillan reports that the biggest predictor of academic success is not race, income, gender, or parents' education; it is the presence of books in the home. In over 11 years of work, Book Harvest has provided over 1.9 million books to children and established a broad and deep partnership with business leaders and owners, dedicated volunteers, community activists, schools, families, and complementary organizations.

In its second decade of work, Book Harvest is still committed to book abundance, early literacy support, and promoting a community-wide culture of literacy. In addition, the organization is dedicated to transforming childhood literacy in Durham and beyond. By launching Book Harvest Durham, Book Harvest is taking its signature literacy programs to scale in Durham to reach every child and family with books and literacy support and continuing to pilot new program innovations and policy initiatives in the organization's home community.

Beyond Durham, Book Harvest, Inc. is replicating its core literacy initiatives in new communities, conducting research on early literacy and book access strategies, releasing and publishing research findings, developing spheres of influence to advocate for and shape public policy, convening regional and national networks of literacy partners and stakeholders to build community-based transformation roadmaps.

We have established a broad and deep partnership with business leaders and owners, dedicated volunteers, fellow community activists, schools, families, and complementary organizations over our first six years that has enabled Book Harvest to provide nearly 2 million books (1.9 million as of October 2022) to children and families in our community.

o Since our founding in 2011, Book Harvest has raised $9,910,161.
o Revenues have increased year-over-year, from $5,255 in 2011 to $2,729,700 in 2022, ending every year in the black.
o We have a diversified portfolio of funders, including individuals, foundations, government, and corporations/businesses.
o We have an 11-year history of balanced budgets and clean annual audits.
o We hold an unwavering commitment to holding an operating reserve fund equal to six months of expenses since 2013, as stipulated in our board-approved operating reserve policy. As of this writing, the operating reserve is fully funded.
o We are in the early stages of a legacy/planned giving program as an onramp to establishing an endowment.
o We developed and maintain an annual scorecard to measure quantitative and qualitative benchmarks of progress (from diversity of staff to experiences of inclusivity). We report to all staff and board about our progress on these benchmarks annually.

Book Harvest recent successes include:
1) Providing our 1,900,000th book to a child (as of October 2022);
2) Reaching 14,360 K – 5th Grade students in 32 schools in three school districts, providing 70,315 books through our 2022 Books on Break program;
4) The appointment of founder Ginger Young as Chief Executive Officer, Book Harvest, Inc. to catalyze and maximize Book Harvest’s impact, scale, and policy influence within and beyond Durham;
5) Equipping 263 K-5 classroom libraries in 11 schools with over 23,000 culturally inclusive children’s books (in 2022);
6) Training leaders in 76 NC counties about implementation strategies for Books on Break through NC Center for Afterschool Programs;
7) Awards and Recognition: Ginger Young: 2022 Women in Business Award, Triangle Business Journal; Meytal Barak: 2021 Inaugural Education Equity Fellow, LatinxEd; Book Harvest: 2020 Library of Congress Literacy Award Winner;
8) Installing dozens of new Book Boxes around Durham;
9) In July 2022, Book Harvest unveiled its 7th laundromat partner location.

Internal Research and Evaluation:
1) Randomized Control Trial (RCT) Evaluation: The conclusion of three years of an external evaluation by nationally renowned Principal Investigator Dr. Iheoma Iruka indicates that Book Babies has the potential to enhance early language and literacy development in children from birth to age 3.

2) Analyses of Parent Focus Groups: Just published in the renowned Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, “In their own words: Parents' voices about a book-provision program" presents the findings of 12 intensive focus groups with 43 Book Babies parents. Written by prominent Early Childhood Education researcher, Dr. Cristina Gillanders, and Book Harvest’s Director of Early Literacy, Meytal Barak, the article presents the impact of Book Babies on parents’ knowledge about childhood development; interest in and excitement about reading with their children; and participation in new activities that promote early literacy and language development.

3) Annual Parent Surveys: The 2021 Book Babies Family Survey reveals the impact of the program on families. Among the findings:
▪ 98% say Book Babies supports them in including early literacy strategies at home;
▪ 99% report that the program has a direct impact on their children’s early language and literacy;
▪ 94% state that Book Babies helps them create a daily reading routine.

4) National Research Briefing: In September 2021, we hosted our first-ever national research briefing entitled “Parents Make the Difference.” More than 70 organizations from across the country brought participants to learn about the impact of Book Babies on shared reading routines among families and the development of early childhood literacy and language development. Our second national webinar will occur on October 26, 2022. The focus will be on book access for all children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Book Harvest provides books to children in North Carolina ages 0-18, with additional programs that partner with Medicaid-eligible children and their families. In our home community of Durham, NC, approximately 36.3% of babies born each year are Medicaid eligible. Children in Durham’s black and Hispanic communities are more likely to live in low-income households (57% and 86%) than white children (14%). Durham Public Schools’ Student Proficiency data for its 2019-2020 Kindergarten class reveal further profound inequities. The most recent assessment of entering kindergarteners indicated that only 35.6% were determined to be proficient: 30.1% of African American children were proficient; 14.7% of Latinx children were proficient; 69.2% of white children were proficient.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We received feedback regarding book accessibility -- families struggled to gain access to the free children's books we provided due to transportation, time, distance to travel, etc. In response, we created Book Boxes. Book Harvest's Book Boxes are colorful, outdoor book access hubs placed in community settings that families frequent. In close collaboration with many community partners -- child care centers, public parks and recreations centers, faith communities, social service agencies, health clinics and schools among them -- Book Boxes are filled with dozens of books for children of all ages, precious titles that children and families can choose to take home and build their own home libraries. Since early 2021, we have installed 18 Book Boxes throughout Durham (and counting!).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback has shown that we are listening to our constituents, hearing their needs, and creating dialogue within our organization. We are also acting fast to change based on the feedback, which creates trust. The feedback loops we have started through a variety of channels are continuing to become stronger, and responses are becoming more specific, supportive, and honest. In addition, more community members are offering to be part of the changes they're requesting. We have also hired several individuals who utilize our services as a way to nourish our relationship with those we serve on a deeper, more consistent level.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

BOOK HARVEST
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BOOK HARVEST

Board of directors
as of 10/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Sarah Wood

Attorney, Guardian Ad Litem

Term: 2021 - 2024


Board co-chair

Richard Hunt

Strategic Marketing Executive and Educator, 77 West Consulting

Term: 2019 - 2023

Michael Giarla

Financial Advisor; former CEO, Amundi Smith Breeden, LLC

Iheoma Iruka

Research Professor, Department of Public Policy; Fellow, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute; Founding Director of the Equity Research Action Coalition, UNC- Chapel Hill

Anna Reilly

Education and Early Childhood Advocate

Ginger Young

Founder and CEO, Book Harvest

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/6/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/06/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.