NATIVE AMERICAN ADVANCEMENT FOUNDATION INC

Honoring Our Past by Building Brighter Futures

aka NAAF   |   Tucson, AZ   |  https://www.naafnow.org

Mission

NAAF was founded to assist and promote research-based, community-driven, sustainable development throughout the Tohono O'odham Nation.

Notes from the nonprofit

COVID-19 has impacted service needs for GuVo District, especially in areas of education and food security. As a result, NAAF expanded remote education service in the After School and Summer Adventure programs with increased enrollment and daily household delivery service. NAAF also increased adult learning program enrollment. Simultaneously, all students dealt with new technology challenges, including acquiring laptops and accessing reliable internet or telecommunications service conducive for online learning. NAAF collaborated with the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and Google to share more on COVID-19 related education challenges: https://youtu.be/g3o0YzK2OcM

Ruling year info

2011

CEO

Jordan Evans

Main address

PO Box 64877

Tucson, AZ 85728 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2725155

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

NAAF focuses programming in the western region, of the Tohono O'odham Nation (TON) in the GuVo District and the villages of Ali Chugk, Ku:Kaj, Pia Oik and GuVo Village. In GuVo District, more than 75% of the community live below the poverty line, and much of that poverty is experienced by children, youth and elders. Compounding the economic realities, the western region is challenged by lack of infrastructure and remote geography. GuVo is located on the far western side of the nation. This location complicates access to services in Sells, AZ on the eastern side of the TON (60 miles away) and the Tucson metropolitan area (120 miles away). Annual monsoons contribute to isolation by flooding roads in and around the region. Proximity to the U.S.-Mexico border and fluctuating federal policies create complex multi-jurisdiction and land infringement. Issues of access, food insecurity, economic development, public safety, health, education, and elder care are all exacerbated by the isolation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

This program provides children a safe and nurturing place to go after school and receive a healthy meal, tutoring and homework assistance. Students begin each session with study hour, where instructors provide tutoring in reading, writing, math, science, and the study of computer programming and robotics. STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) activities take place every other session. Tohono O’odham language and culture are foundational in the ASP. Language is taught through O’odham “Word of the Day” and “Phrase of the Week” lessons and speaking with participants. Elders and O’odham teachers share cultural lessons, basket making, traditional saguaro fruit harvesting, games, songs, and dances. Through a partnership with Arizona Complete Health, NAAF teaches “Too Good for Drugs and Violence” lessons to understand the harm of underage drinking and drug use. Upon completion of their studies, the students participate in cultural, arts and crafts, games and outdoor activities. The program operates in two villages (Al Jek and GuVo) and students are fed a healthy meal and snack daily.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

This program is an extension of the ASP during the summer months. The goal of the program is to promote education, build youth self-esteem, spark curiosity and shape strong, healthy, contributing members of society. The program focuses on teaching reading, math, technology, and health education. Also incorporated are the teaching and development of traditional Tohono O'odham art, handicrafts, language, gardening, and cultural history. The students take field trips to educational hotspots such as Kitt Peak, The Pima Air & Space Museum, Biosphere 2. Connecting core O’odham values of himdag and i:mig to summer adventures is part of the cultural geography experiences on the reservation. Students visit the historic village of Kukatch and ancestral lands where they learn respect for elders, their sacred sites and basic survival techniques. Through a partnership with Arizona Complete Health, the SAP also teaches the students “Too Good for Drugs and Violence” lessons to highlight the harms of underage drinking and drug use. SAP also provides meals during the summer months and any young person who comes to the facility receives a meal, regardless of program enrollment.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Indigenous peoples

This program provides online support for students who wish to finish their education on their own time, whether due to employment or family commitments, and to keep up with their credits until they can reintegrate into the traditional school system. The VLC provides these services for K-12 and high school online education. Youth who have dropped out of school are able to reengage in a learning environment and register for online classes. This program serves as a tool in educating the Tohono O’odham Nation's most at-risk youth. Young adults who have dropped out of school are also given the opportunity to enroll in an online credit recovery program and work towards receiving their high school diploma in a program called “Graduation Solutions.” This program is currently operating at capacity and meets three times a week. NAAF provides these students with transportation, laptops and internet services. And the VLC laptops are equipped with tutoring and academic support services.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

I:mig is an O’odham concept positing how everything is related, including culture, identity, and sacred geography.
“This language is a gift—and if you know it, you teach it.” Selina Jesus expressed the purpose of the new Native American Advancement Foundation (NAAF) project. This is a Tohono O’odham language documentation and teaching program rooted in intergenerational sharing. We are focusing on the western Tohono O’odham geography.
Our project will expand existing NAAF language programs and develop new curricula for all ages at beginner, intermediate and advanced levels. Language programs will be based on documenting Western dialects with cultural knowledge, I:mig and identity, storytelling and sacred site mapping. Our methodology is a community collaboration and will connect elders and teachers to younger generations. In return, young people will document language for instruments, including a mobile language app, videos, audio, and written materials. All generations will contribute to documenting dialects for future generations.

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Economically disadvantaged people

The Store provides four rural communities with access to food. This program also provides job training and internships for high school and college students, allowing them to build their resumes for future employment. The Store helps break a cycle of poverty among women by offering part-time employment. Finally, The Store serves as a gathering place for locals to enjoy outside games and events in a safe and drug/alcohol free environment, promoting a drug/alcohol free lifestyle in a prevention type model.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Indigenous peoples

The Internship is an opportunity for students to acquire administrative and leadership skills in diverse NAAF programming. This year, the NAAF interns worked in The Store, ran the GuVo After School Program and developed the ASP academic calendar, and facilitated the Summer Adventure Program. For the 2018-2019 ASP, the interns organized arts and crafts activities, field trips, STEM events, outdoor recreation, and O’odham language lessons.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Indigenous peoples

Girls Voices is an extension of the ASP, in partnership with the Greater Good organization. Girls Voices honors and empowers young women by providing resources in education, job training, health, support, and creative expression. This year, young women in the program created videos to bring awareness to other young women and raise money for scholarships. And these Girls Voices participants donated funds to feed children in the ASP.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
At-risk youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students showing interest in topics related to STEM

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, At-risk youth

Related Program

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Substantial increases in student participation in 2020 reflect NAAF's expanded program capacity to mitigate impacts of COVID-19.

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, At-risk youth

Related Program

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Graduation rates are contingent on age demographics of reservation community students.

Number of students demonstrating responsible behaviors and work habits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, At-risk youth

Related Program

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Substantial increases in student participation in 2020 reflect NAAF's expanded program capacity to mitigate impacts of COVID-19.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, At-risk youth

Related Program

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Substantial increases in student participation in 2020 reflect NAAF's expanded program capacity to mitigate impacts of COVID-19.

Number of students who demonstrate the desire to succeed in the academic setting

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, At-risk youth

Related Program

Gu Vo Academic After-School Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Substantial increases in student participation in 2020 reflect NAAF's expanded program capacity to mitigate impacts of COVID-19.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To assist and promote research based, community driven, sustainable development throughout the Tohono O'odham Nation. To partner with various organizations to provide the necessary support needed for the advancement of Native American communities. Through our combined efforts, we are strengthening Native American communities by supporting and promoting education, health and wellness, and opening economic opportunities in the Nation.

Specifically, we target graduation rates in primary and secondary education, and help students create empowered choices for sustainable, healthy and positive futures. We prioritize prevention (substance and suicide) from a Tohono O'odham cultural perspective, rooting health in culture and tradition called the "himdag" and "i:mig". With the collaboration of community elders and youth, NAAF seeks to preserve and revitalize Tohono O'odham language use. And with new projects in food sovereignty and youth recreation, NAAF is creating community spaces for health equity, art, culture and environmental restoration in the Sonoran Desert.

All NAAF programming is based on community-centered research and long-term program sustainability, accountable to Tohono O'odham values. Our mission is accomplished through educational after-school programs for our youth, educational summer enrichment programs, GED and adult education programs, online coursework, and a head start style program for the little ones. With community feedback, NAAF expands and adapts projects and programmings to needs and visions of GuVo District youth, families and elders.

As members of the Nation, we have a vested interest and long-term commitment to the betterment of our community. We are uniquely qualified to assist our community as we have a personal understanding of the needs and desires of the people of the District and the Nation at large. Our Executive Director has worked in the nonprofit field for over 15 years and holds a Master of Public Administration degree.

Each year we have seen incredible results with GPA rates soaring, dropout rates plummeting, and a true desire to learn and be successful in life among the students. Additionally, we have developed new programs based on community feedback and the long-term relationships between NAAF and GuVo District families to achieve goals. For example, through 2020 a new learning site called Ruth's Garden was created for food security and youth education. The pilot year was successful and families requested not only a expanded Ruth's Garden but more food security and traditional ecological knowledge projects for 2021. The goal is to expand our programs all across the Tohono O'odham Nation.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, As a community-based organization, NAAF enjoys long-term relationships with families.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    COVID-19 hit the Tohono O'odham Nation, as many other Native American communities quite hard. Specifically in GuVo District, the pandemic negatively impacted food security and education access for all students, preschool, K-12 and adult learners in GED and Grad Solutions (diploma-based secondary education). NAAF worked with community representatives and designed two data collection instruments in summer 2020 to determine education technology access and need to sustain academics for 2020-2021 school year. Community members shared feedback and as a result, NAAF expanded remote education services, daily household service delivery and computer and internet services for district families.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

NATIVE AMERICAN ADVANCEMENT FOUNDATION INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

NATIVE AMERICAN ADVANCEMENT FOUNDATION INC

Board of directors
as of 06/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Susan Warmack

Liz Baker

Jennifer Dietze

Selina Jesus

Robert Stish

Priscilla Thomas

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/16/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.