Chesapeake Institute for Local Sustainable Food & Agriculture

aka Real Food for Kids - Montgomery (RFKM), Brickyard Educational Farm (BEF)   |   ROCKVILLE, MD   |  cilsfa.org

Mission

The Chesapeake Institute for Local Sustainable Food and Agriculture's mission is to promote research and education in sustainable agriculture in order to benefit the American public and others.

Ruling year info

2012

President of the Board

Edward Guss

Main address

12320 Parklawn Dr

ROCKVILLE, MD 20852 USA

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EIN

45-2744679

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (K05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Brickyard Educational Farm

Brickyard Educational Farm's mission is to connect people with the land, water, food and biodiversity that sustain them. Brickyard Educational Farm (BEF) started up in January, 2012 inside of a 32-year old organic seed farm. The farm, located in Potomac, Maryland, served over 700 children through its outdoor and environmental farm field trip program.

Population(s) Served

Our mission is to advocate for fresh, whole and nutrient-rich foods in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS), to reduce the availability of foods that are low in nutritional value, and to increase the availability of local and sustainable foods. We seek to collaborate with MCPS and other community stakeholders, recognizing that wholesome food is an educational investment that leads to academic success, improved behavior, and better health outcomes. We believe that improving students' food options is a critical part of MCPS' commitment to support the whole child.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meetings held with decision makers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Real Food for Kids - Montgomery

Context Notes

RFKM held 33 meetings with state legislators, county council members, school board members, and the COO and Director of Food and Nutrition Services for MCPS.

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Real Food for Kids - Montgomery

Context Notes

RFKM hosted a screening of "Fed Up" to educate parents and community members about the dangers of added sugar in the diet that was attended by 60 people.

Number of policies formally established

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Real Food for Kids - Montgomery

Context Notes

2015: prohibition on 2 artificial sweeteners in competitive foods sold during the school day; 2014: removal of strawberry milk, policy prohibiting chemical additivies & policy giving kids free water

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Related Program

Real Food for Kids - Montgomery

Context Notes

By the end of 2015, RFKM had 2948 subscribers to its e-newsletters, the majority parents and students in the Montgomery County Public Schools.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization currently houses two programs – Real Food for Kids – Montgomery (RFKM), which mobilizes parents, students, educators and community members to promote policies, practices and educational opportunities that improve the food environment and general health and well-being of students in the Montgomery County Public Schools, and Brickyard Educational Farm (BEF), which is currently working to establish an educational farm on 20-acres of land owned by the Montgomery County Public School System.

RFKM advocates at the local, district and state levels to bring about changes. At the local level, we recruit and train parents to serve as school representatives, start wellness committees and advocate for changes at individual schools. At the district level we advocate to the Division of Food and Nutrition Services through the Montgomery County Council of PTAs, and directly through e-mail, in-person meetings, and by hosting educational workshops. We also testify and write letters to the Board of Education and school administrators. We work at the state level via a program of School Food Environment Grades and through statewide legislation.

RFKM has been successfully advocating for and achieving positive changes to the school food in Montgomery County for the last 3.75 years, have built up a grassroots following of more than 4300 parents and community supporters and have representatives to 55 of the 202 public schools in the county.

A running list of RFKM's accomplishments can be found at: http://www.realfoodforkidsmontgomery.org/accomplishments.php. In brief, our advocacy has led to the elimination of strawberry milk, a delay in vending machine sales of soda and candy until 30 minutes after the end of the school day, free bottles of water for elementary school children, a new policy prohibiting several synthetic food dyes and other dangerous food additives from future food contracts for all school food, changes to the Wellness Regulation to prohibit the artificial sweeteners aspartame and Acesulfame potassium in food sold from midnight until 30 minutes after the end of the school day, the establishment of a district-wide Wellness Committee during school year 15-16 to make recommendations about the implementation of the Wellness Policy and Regulation, and better transparency about the existence of a la carte items sold in cafeterias. In individual schools, our representatives' work has led to the formation of more than 10 wellness committees, the replacement or removal of unhealthy a la carte items; healthier fundraisers, parties and school snacks and policies about these; the installation of salad bars and school gardens; and wellness and nutrition education programming for children and their families.

Financials

Chesapeake Institute for Local Sustainable Food & Agriculture
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Chesapeake Institute for Local Sustainable Food & Agriculture

Board of directors
as of 11/20/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Edward Guss

Retired

Term: 2013 - 2016

Julie Pearlman

National Garden Club, Inc.

Victoria Cowles

Yellow Barn

Hank Cole

Henry S. Cole & Associates

Annita Seckinger

Center for Democracy in the Americas

Lisa Buttner

School Garden Committee