PLATINUM2021

Life After Hate

There is life after hate

aka Life After Hate   |   Chicago, IL   |  www.lifeafterhate.org

Mission

Life After Hate is committed to helping people leave the violent far-right to connect with humanity and lead compassionate lives. Since 2011, Life After Hate has been at the forefront of the national strategy to interrupt far-right violence committed in the name of ideological and/or religious belief providing supportive services for men and women looking to leave hate groups, education and outreach, academic research, and cultural competency training. The organization was founded by former leaders (formers) of radicalized neo-Nazi, skinhead, and other extremist groups in North America, who today are solely committed to addressing violent far-right extremism through a lens informed by experiential knowledge, personal growth, and professional training.

Ruling year info

2011

Interim Executive Director

Dr. Pete Simi PhD

Main address

17 E Monroe St. STE #348

Chicago, IL 60603 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-3039640

NTEE code info

Intergroup/Race Relations (R30)

Domestic National Security (includes Military and Defense Issues) (Q43)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Violent far-right extremism threatens democratic principles across the country and represents a significant and growing security concern within the U.S. While much attention has been paid to foreign-influenced radicalization and terrorism, there has been a significant increase in activity classified as violent far-right extremism (VFRE) in the past decade (Pitcavage, 2005). VFRE is used to describe groups and individuals that adhere to violent white supremacist ideology and can encompass an assortment of organizations to include Neo-Nazis, White Nationalists, Skinheads, Neo-Confederates, Ku Klux Klan, Anti-Immigrant, and Anti-LGBT, among others (Beirich and Buchanan, 2018). These organizations have a lengthy history of criminal violence that includes mass murder, physical assaults, home invasions, property crimes, counterfeiting, and acts of terrorism (Simi, Smith, and Reeser, 2008). Life After Hate's ExitUSA™ program provides an exit strategy for individuals in these groups.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ExitUSA

Disengagement and deradicalization are complex, lifelong processes that require individualized approaches and support.

Operated by highly developed and empathic formers, LAH’s ExitUSA™ program provides around the clock tailored support, education, and referral services to ensure people can build a new, more fulfilling life, free from hate.

Since 2018, ExitUSA has helped more than 153 individuals and families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of new Life After Hate's ExitUSA™ program cases.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

ExitUSA

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This figure represents individual men and women service recipients (Number of Clients Served) and family service recipients (Number of Families served).

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

*2020 presentations were less than previous years due to Covid-19. Public events include community presentations developed and delivered, as well as interviews made by the Life After Hate team.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

ExitUSA

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This figure represents individual men and women ExitUSA™ service recipients. To date, we have helped 400+ people confront and exit VFRE; and thousands more deal with hate in their communities.

Number of families served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

ExitUSA

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This figure represents ExitUSA™ family service recipients. To date, we have helped 400+ people confront and exit VFRE; and thousands more deal with hate in their communities.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

ExitUSA

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Participants are inmates in a U.S. correctional facility who are actively engaged in Life After Hate's ExitUSA™ through inmate support.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Life After Hate is committed to helping people leave the violent far-right to connect with humanity and lead compassionate lives.

It envisions a world that allows people to change and contribute to a society without violence.

Since 2011, Life After Hate has been at the forefront of the national strategy to interrupt far-right violence committed in the name of ideological and/or religious belief providing supportive services for men and women looking to leave hate groups, education and outreach, academic research, and cultural competency training.

Provide exit services to meet growing demand.

Raise awareness of drivers to and pathways out of hate and extremism.

Build rigorous evidence-based solutions to address the growing threat of violent far-right extremism that position the organization as a leader.

Life After Hate was founded by former leaders (formers) of radicalized neo-Nazi, skinhead, and other extremist groups in North America, who today are solely committed to addressing violent far-right extremism through a lens informed by experiential knowledge, personal growth, and professional training.

The organization has unique insights about violent far-right extremism and the demanding mental and emotional process to not only disengage, but also to deradicalize. Being a former is not the only requirement to become an expert on the complex psychosocial aspects of violent far-right extremism and ways in which to combat it; being a Former shapes this expertise.

Decades of personal experience and growth are complemented by extensive professional development and training as well as academic instruction in social work, mental health, and other related fields.

The organization’s work is further bolstered through strategic partnerships with leading subject matter experts and organizations from around the world focused on understanding and addressing violent far-right extremism, including its governing Board of Directors composed of eminent professionals in the violent far-right extremism space, research, and management.

Life After Hate is a leader in the violence intervention community. We are the first organization in the U.S. that counters violence by intervening at the source: Helping individuals exit hate groups and online hate spaces. Since our founding in 2011, Life After Hate has expanded its services to include family members of individuals who are involved with the violent far right or are disengaging.

A central part of our mission is our innovative approach to interventions. Using a multidisciplinary team model combining formers and mental health practitioners, we help individuals identify what they need to leave hate and violence and set and manage their goals to restore their lives–this includes a combination of outside referrals, skill building and peer-to-peer interventions. Individuals working to understand their journey in hate and violence often seek the guidance of those who have lived those experiences. Sometimes the best way out is with help from those who have gotten out.

We believe that shame is not an effective tool to inspire change. Our approach addressing underlying risk factors to disarm violence is evidence-based and supported by research. Ultimately, our direct-service work combating violent extremism helps establish a safer and more resilient nation. Individuals who do not disengage from hate groups or hateful online spaces are more likely to commit acts of violence. They are also likely to contribute to a toxic online environment that encourages others to violence.

In the most recent quarter of 2021, Life After Hate received more than 60 requests for services; 28 individuals completed intake forms and our staff completed 70 meetings with 13 of these clients. In that same period, we held more than 250 meetings with our current caseload (nearly 60 clients). This work is labor-intensive, and nearly all our clients are “high-need,” meaning they’ll require on average 4-6 weeks of service.

A big part of our strategy also includes building a network of mental health practitioners who can work with our clients where they live, pro bono or at a reduced rate. In 2022, we aim to train at least 40 professionals so that they are culturally competent and prepared to meet the very specific needs of our client base.

Financials

Life After Hate
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Life After Hate

Board of directors
as of 02/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Brette Steele

Life After Hate, Inc.

Term: 2020 -

Vidhya Ramalingam

Moonshot CVE

Dr. Peter Simi

Director of the Earl Babbie Research Center and Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Chapman University

Brette Steele

Director of Prevention and National Security at the McCain Institute for International Leadership

Humera Khan

President and co-founder of Muflehun and is a co-investigator for a DOD MINERVA project on terrorist propaganda.

Joumana Silyan-Saba

Director of Policy and Discrimination Enforcement for the Los Angeles City Civil + Human Rights and Equity Department (LA Civil Rights).

Shawn Herron

CD/Creative Technologist in the Axis Group at Wunderman Thompson.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability