THE SPRING OF HOPE SCHOOL

New York City, NY   |  SpringOfHopeSchool.org

Mission

Our mission is helping Cambodia's minorities in their decades-long recovery from the Khmer Rouge genocide, as well as encouraging cultural diversity in modern Cambodia.

We have chosen education of children and young adults as our means towards these goals.

Notes from the nonprofit

We have recently completed a merger between the Cambodian Village Scholars Fund and the Spring of Hope School. The two programs shared the identical goals of educating rural Cambodian Cham children by teaching English. We are in process of merging the two school programs. English gives these youngsters the opportunity to work in tourism, obtain city jobs, and attend university (which is taught in largely in English). Our program has raised the perceived value of education, and reduced the number of primary school dropouts as well as encouraging a number of children to reenter public school and eventually graduate. Eleven of our university students have graduated and two more remain in school.

Ruling year info

2012

Board Chairman

Mr. Craig Tooman

Main address

℅ CTA Architects P.C. 151 West 26th Street, 8th Floor

New York City, NY 10001 USA

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Formerly known as

The Cambodian Village Scholars Fund

EIN

45-3192724

NTEE code info

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Q01)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Cham minority population in rural Cambodia suffered a 60-70% loss in population during the period of the Khmer Rouge. They had been specifically targeted for extinction by Pol Pot. Their intellectuals, religious leaders, cultural materials and vast numbers of their people were destroyed. Since then they have been a marginalized Muslim group in a Buddhist country, largely subsisting on rice farming. Education was seen as having little practical purpose and children routinely did field and home duties rather than attend school. Girls were particularly denied educational opportunities. High school graduation rates were pitiful. Our free English programs have attracted many students to their after-school-hours classes. Education in general has risen in perceived value. Girls are actively involved and students who had dropped out of the state Khmer schools began to return to those classes as well. The rate of high school graduation rose.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

University Program

The University Program has provided scholarships for 13 Cham youth to attend university in Phnom Penh. 11 have graduated and two more remain in their studies.

 

At the end of each academic year, each student signs a note acknowledging his/her debt to the Fund of 1/3 of the cost of their studies that year and promising to pay it back after graduation.  This is cosigned by their village elder as is Cambodian custom.

Population(s) Served

This program teaches English to grammar and secondary school children aged 7 -21 in two impoverished, rural, Cham towns in central Cambodia.  The teachers are a part of the local community.  Children attend classes when they are not busy at the mandatory Khmer national school or working at home or in the fields.  It is free to all of the children who attend.

We measure success by the number of elementary and secondary school children who participate in our English Language Program.  We also measure the rate of high school graduation amongst our pupils compared to the overall high school population.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Improve educational and job opportunities for boys and girls in a rural minority community of traditional Cham people, while maintaining the cultural richness and knowledge base of the Imam Sann Cham.

1. Provide free English language education to primary and high school students, enabling them to seek urban employment, tourism positions and university educations (which in Cambodia are taught predominately in English).
2. Provide major university scholarships for equal numbers of boys and girls each year, drawing from the pool of high school graduates who have attended our primary English program.

1. Local trilingual Cham teachers provide classes in two rural Cambodian communities.
2. Thirteen university students have received our generous academic scholarships in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. They have studied fields of their choosing and we provided housing for them. Eleven have graduated and two continue their studies.

1. Enrollment rose over the first eleven years of the project (2005-2016) and remained stable for a number of years.
2. We provided financial support for one of our Cambodian English teachers to obtain a teaching degree in English language, with improved skills.
3. High school drop out rates have diminished, particularly amongst girls, as education has been progressively seen as a valuable asset for rural farming parents to give their children.
4. English fluency has improved in students and some students' conversation skills have actually exceeded our teacher.
5. All university students have passed all their courses, despite the socially jolting change of moving from rural poverty to the big city. Group living has provided integral support for new arrivals.
6. Eleven student has graduated from university and two others are in final 2 years.
7. Next we need to fully integrate the teaching programs that are used in both towns.
8. Improve local leadership.

Financials

THE SPRING OF HOPE SCHOOL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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THE SPRING OF HOPE SCHOOL

Board of directors
as of 08/23/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Craig Tooman

CTA Architects P.C.

Term: 2017 - 2019

Richard Geist

None

Wynne Cougill

Tetra Tech

Dara Magagnoli

CTA Architects

Jill Crawford

CTA Architects

Asaf Yogev

CTA Architects

Keith Lavit

Alanna Jaworski

CTA Architects

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes