Environmental Quality Protection, Beautification

Adventure Scientists

Explore. Collect. Protect

aka Adventure Scientists   |   Bozeman, MT   |  www.adventurescientists.org

Mission

We equip partners with data collected from the outdoors that are crucial to unlocking solutions to the world's environmental challenges.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Gregg Treinish

Main address

PO Box 1834

Bozeman, MT 59771 USA

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Formerly known as

ASC

EIN

45-3345338

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Land Resources Conservation (C34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Connectivity - Roadkill Survey

Wildlife live almost everywhere people do, and roads are a common cause of death for many animals. Adventure Scientists is recruiting road bikers, walkers, runners and others near roads to record roadkill observations.

This data helps our partner scientist at the University of California-Davis Road Ecology Center study the following:

- Which species are most affected and when
- Wildlife travel patterns and whether there are roadkill "hotspots"
- How to reduce vehicle-caused animal deaths

Ultimately, we plan to bring together ecology researchers and transportation policy makers to re-design transportation systems based on an understanding of how roads affect natural landscapes.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

The Gallatin River carries the mountains to the sea. It carries our communities and our livelihoods. It carries our stories and dreams. And this river also carries something more ominous in its waters: Our garbage.

In an Adventure Scientists pilot survey of five sites along the Gallatin River, microplastic particles were found in every sample, some in startlingly high numbers. With this knowledge, Adventure Scientists launched the Gallatin Microplastics Initiative to study the abundance and types of microplastics in the Gallatin Watershed. This is an expansion of the Adventure Scientists Worldwide Microplastics Project.

​In each year of the Gallatin Microplastics Initiative, 60+ volunteers will return four times to their assigned sites on the main Gallatin and its tributaries, gathering an in-depth picture of plastic pollution from 70 sites in the watershed. This information will help us understand the extent of the problem and how to resolve it.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Wild pollinator populations are in decline. There is limited data to inform the status of pollinators in remote environments. Land managers need our help to gather data in order to conserve and protect those pollinators that support the health and wealth of our public lands.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Illegal logging destroys forests, disrupts ecological processes, increases CO2 in the atmosphere, and provides revenue for other illicit activities. Port officials, law enforcement officers, corporations, and everyday consumers need new tools to disrupt tainted global supply chains. Cutting-edge genetic technologies can help, but in order to do so, they will require extensive DNA reference materials from high-value timber species. In partnership with the World Resources Institute, Adventure Scientists is headed into the field to gather tree tissue samples which geneticists from DNA4 Technologies and New Mexico State University will use to develop the genetic reference libraries. The first phase of this project will focus on the bigleaf maple, a towering hardwood that grows along the Pacific coast of the United States and Canada. Because about one in 20 bigleaf maples possesses an incredibly beautiful wood pattern, these trees are targeted by timber thieves for their high value in the guitar and furniture trade.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Although microplastic particles are smaller than five millimeters in size, they likely pose a massive environmental and human health risk. Ocean researchers have found them in nearly every liter of ocean water they’ve examined, from places including Maine, Alaska, Argentina, Thailand and Antarctica. Toxins including DDT, BPA and pesticides adhere to the particles. Because they can resemble plankton, the particles are often ingested by small aquatic life. The toxins biomagnify as they move up the food chain, accumulating in birds, sea life and humans. Microplastics have several sources: They weather from debris like drink bottles and shopping bags; they're laundered from nylon clothing; and they wash down the drain with many common cosmetics and toothpastes. Collecting water samples worldwide, Adventure Scientists is studying the sources, composition and distribution of this pollution. We plan to work with corporate partners to stop the problem at its source.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Where we work

Awards

Excellence Award 2016

Association of Partners for Public Lands

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

With the successful completion of our worldwide Microplastics project in 2016, our volunteer hours were reduced in 2017 as we turned our attention to location-based and new projects.

Total dollars contributed for conservation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

With the successful completion of our worldwide Microplastics project in 2016, our volunteer dollars contributed were reduced in 2017 as we turned our attention to location-based and new projects.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

We envision a balanced, sustainable world driven by a grassroots wildfire of collaborative scientific advancement. We work to:<br/><br/>1. Be the most efficient provider of hard-to-attain environmental data that would otherwise be missing from conservation management. <br/>2. Grow a network of informed advocates who have a deeper engagement after participating in the scientific process.<br/>3. Serve as an invaluable connector between the conservation and outdoor communities.

The outdoor recreation community has the skills, equipment and time to gather otherwise unattainable data from around the world and is poised to help solve some of the worlds most pressing conservation challenges. Identifying projects where these individuals can have the greatest impact, we recruit, train and manage volunteers on data collection protocols designed in cooperation with our partners. <br/><br/>Often, citizen science endeavors focus almost entirely on the education and engagement of the volunteer rather than the direct and tangible pathways from data collection to outcomes and impacts. While there is a clear benefit to empowering citizens to become part of the scientific process, this approach has consistently fallen short of its potential. Providing decision makers with actionable intel that is focused on the management questions they grapple with is essential if reducing our impact is the ultimate goal. <br/><br/>We believe disseminating the information gathered is of equal importance, and here again the outdoor community is strong. With a tradition of storytelling and the backing of the outdoor industry, we're able to share conservation stories with the world.

We rely on the outdoor adventure community because they are comfortable in the outdoors and can therefore focus on proper data collection. Additionally, these are individuals who (1) pay close attention to detail, (2) are creative problem solvers, and (3) are able to share their experiences via the rich tradition of storytelling that is at the heart of the outdoor community.

With each investment we make, we think of our impact around our projects as a 3 ring bullseye:<br/><br/>Bullseye: There are many issues in which access to data has enormous potential to unlock solutions more quickly and more cost effectively than is otherwise possible. Ultimately, our goal is to supply end-users (typically governments corporations) with data that enables new solutions to happen at scale. This is our main focus with each project investment we take on.<br/><br/>Middle Ring: Through surveys, our volunteers (~6,000) tell us that they make behavioral changes after participating in our projects. They are advocating for the issues they have worked on and report that they are more likely to pursue careers in conservation after their service. As we scale, this number will grow quickly. We consider these outcomes a byproduct of our work. <br/><br/>Outer Ring: We have reached ~100,000,000 people through popular media and social media – this outer level of impact is based around issue awareness. We consider this outcome a byproduct of our work.

Since our founding in 2011, Adventure Scientists has sent thousands of volunteers on missions to collect data from remote, difficult-to-access locations for our conservation partners. These partnerships have led to the discovery of more than three dozen new species, provided key information to guide climate change decision-making, and helped protect threatened wildlife habitat around the world. <br/><br/>Our work has been featured in hundreds of media outlets, and our volunteer adventurers are making a difference around the world. ​​

Financials

Adventure Scientists
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Adventure Scientists

Board of directors
as of 9/11/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Gregg Treinish


Board co-chair

Christy Chin

Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

Gib Myers

Jim Young

Kate Wing

Page Dabney

Mike Herring

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

adventure, science, data, volunteer, conservation