City Dogs Rescue

Bringing lifesaving efforts to more four-legged friends

aka City Dogs & City Kitties Rescue   |   Washington, DC   |  www.citydogsrescuedc.org

Mission

City Dogs & City Kitties Rescue's mission is to rescues adoptable dogs and cats in overcrowded and high-kill shelters, where resources are severely limited. Through our partnerships with a cadre of volunteers, foster homes, shelters, veterinarians, and trainers, we offer a lifeline to as many of these wonderful animals as possible. Sadly, many of the dogs and cats that we take in are just days — and sometimes hours — away from being euthanized for no reason other than lack of space. By finding these animals permanent and loving homes in the DC metropolitan area, we can enrich the lives of humans and their pets.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Patricia Kennedy

Main address

301 H St NE Ste B

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-3356528

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Unnecessary euthanasia at overcrowded and under-resourced rural animal shelters

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter to Rescue

GOAL: Decrease unnecessary euthanasia at our partner shelters by transferring healthy and treatable companion animals from the shelter to our rescue

We identify and coordinate the release of adoptable dogs from rural county kill shelters. This program benefits these often overcrowded and under-resourced shelters by reducing their animal population and the need for the county to euthanize animals simply due to lack of space. Additionally, relocating these dogs and cats from rural areas to the DC metro region provides more exposure and adoption opportunities.

Population(s) Served

GOAL: Provide temporary quality care for the dogs and cats we rescue in a nurturing home environment while they await adoption.

We can't save cats and dogs without foster homes. It's that simple! Since we don't have our own facility, we rely on private volunteer foster homes to care for our dogs and cats until they are adopted. A foster’s job is to help their dog acclimate to their new environment by providing a stable home (some have never lived indoors before), consistent and healthy meals, and patience, love, and affection—something many of these dogs have not experienced before.

CDCK provides supplies, monthly medications, and pays for all medical care that arises while the dog or cat is in foster.

Population(s) Served

GOAL: Provide high-quality care for our animals in a manner that still allows us to be good stewards of our resources.

Maintain our standards of care in concurrence with the Asilomar Accords definitions of “Healthy,” “Treatable,” “Unhealthy &​ Untreatable." CDCK is a no-kill rescue in that every medically and behaviorally "healthy" and "treatable" dog or cat that comes into our care will be saved. This means prioritizing safety and quality of life for both the animals and people in our community.

CDCK's medical and behavior budget is approximately $600,000 to provide care for 1,000-1,500 dogs and cats annually. We regularly treat animals with parasite infections, viruses acquired in their previous shelters, heartworm disease, orthopedic conditions, and more. Additionally, CDCK partners with local trainers and medical behaviorists on an as-needed basis to support the animals in our care.

Population(s) Served

GOAL 1: Successfully place adoptable dogs and cats in committed and loving forever homes in the DC Metro region.
GOAL 2: Be an educational resource in order to promote responsible dog and cat guardianship in our community.

Potential adopters complete an application that allows the organization to understand the expectations of potential adopters and their readiness to commit to companion animal guardianship. The application is both thorough and educational. Volunteers screen applications to identify what we believe will be the best environment for each particular cat or dog. Volunteer applications counselors work with applicants to both identify a dog or cat that will fit their lifestyle and further discussions around expectations and needs of the particular animal of interest. Once an applicant is fully approved and ready to adopt, they complete an adoption contract agreeing to provide responsible care and companionship to the dog or cat they adopt.

Additionally, CDCK continues to provide mentoring support to all adopters after adoption.


Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups
Sexual identity

Where we work

Awards

Best of D.C. 2020

City Paper

Affiliations & memberships

Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Shelter to Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Decrease unnecessary euthanasia at our partner shelters by transferring healthy and treatable companion animals from the shelter to our rescue.

2. Provide high-quality care for our animals in a manner that still allows us to be good stewards of our resources.

3. Successfully place adoptable dogs and cats in responsible, educated, forever, loving homes.

4. Promote responsible companion animal guardianship throughout our community.

5. Be a positive visible presence and resource for the care of companion animals.

6. Provide a welcoming and supportive environment for volunteers, adopters, donors, and our community of supporters.

7. Be transparent and provide accurate information.

8. Sustain long-term financial health and stability.

9. Support and nurture our partner shelters.

1. Establish trusted partnerships with rural shelters that are able to provide accurate information about the animals in their facilities.

2. Maintain our standards of care in concurrence with the Asilomar Accords definitions of “Healthy,” “Treatable,” “Unhealthy &​ Untreatable." CDCK is a no-kill rescue in that every medically and behaviorally "healthy" and "treatable" dog or cat that comes into our care will be saved. This means prioritizing safety and quality of life for both the animals and people in our community. Dogs and cats who cannot be rehabilitated medically or behaviorally are humanely euthanized.

3. Apply industry best practices that align with our mission and vision to improve program efficiencies and find permanent loving homes for our adoptable cats and dogs.

4. Provide up-to-date resources about medical care, training, and other animal management to set adopters up for successful integration into their homes.

5. Obtain a long-term administrative location in Washington, DC to provide reliable intake space and opportunity to engage with our community through social and educational events.

6. Provide training and education to volunteers, staff, and board members to ensure all are applying industry best practices and able to carry out their duties with clarity and intent.

7. Employ additional digital applications:
- To efficiently manage all aspects of the rescue
- Provide accurate and thorough reporting to our community


How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

City Dogs Rescue

Board of directors
as of 6/27/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Darren Binder

Senior Vice President & Chief Legal and Risk Officer as well as Corporate Secretary for St. Charles Health System, Inc.

Term: 2021 - 2021

Darren Binder

Senior Vice President & Chief Legal and Risk Officer as well as Corporate Secretary for St. Charles Health System, Inc.

David Liedman

Analyst at St. Charles Health System, City Dogs Daycare; Jade Fitness

Jodi Sirotnak

Competitive Intelligence SpecialistCherokee Federal

Dr. Dan Teich

Founder & Medical Director at District Veterinary Hospital

Sasha Miller

Partner at Zuckerman Spaeder LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Not applicable
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.