Administer Justice

Justice Made Simple

aka Administer Justice   |   Elgin, IL   |  http://www.administerjustice.org

Mission

Administer Justice empowers vulnerable neighbors with the help of a lawyer and the hope of God’s love.  Their vision is to see 1,000 Gospel Justice Centers transforming lives in the name of Christ.  This is accomplished through church based, local neighborhood centers operating by trained volunteers one Saturday a month. Administer Justice equips the local church and support teams with the tool kit, training, and expertise to help make legal ministry possible.  They raise awareness on the legal needs of the poor through the book, Gospel Justice, speaking at conferences, and writing.

Notes from the nonprofit

Administer Justice’s mission is to empower vulnerable neighbors with the help of a lawyer and the hope of God’s love. The organization provides thought leadership through writing and speaking on biblical justice issues as they intersect with legal and government issues impacting the poor and vulnerable. The organization equips local churches to establish legal aid centers operating once a month for advice, education, limited engagement assistance, and referrals.

Ruling year info

2012

Founder & CEO

Mr. Bruce D. Strom

Main address

1750 Grandstand Pl Suite 15

Elgin, IL 60123-4900 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Gospel Justice Initiative

EIN

45-3450789

NTEE code info

Legal Services (I80)

Administration of Justice, Courts (Court Administration, Court Reform, Alternatives to Litigation and Sentencing) (I50)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Legal Support

Provide legal support to the oppressed and abused victims of injustice, who usually cannot afford to otherwise hire legal counsel, or who have no idea how to access the benefits of the legal system

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

ECFA (Evangelical Council on Financial Accountability) 2022

Excellence in Giving 2022

Best Christian Workplaces 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Net promoter score

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Legal Support

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We launched client experience surveys in April of 2020 as a means to invite every client to share how they felt about their experience with Administer Justice. Our 2021 YTD score is 85.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In a nation that pledges liberty and justice for all, no one should face confusing legal circumstances alone. However, a major report released in 2020 demonstrated 150 million Americans encountered civil legal issues and more than 80% faced those issues alone. 40% of America’s counties are legal deserts meaning there is less than 1 lawyer per 1,000 residents.

For more than 20 years, Administer Justice has entered that confusion with the help of a lawyer and the hope of God’s love. We believe no one does justice alone and no one should face injustice alone. Our unique service model affirms dignity & sustainability, is biblical & holistic, and is church-led, team-supported, and neighborhood-based.

We aim to expand access to justice into 300 neighborhoods in the next three years with the long-term goal of 1,000 neighborhoods where local volunteer teams, including an attorney, come together to serve members of the community who lack affordable access to justice.

1. Launch national attorney recruiting campaign, including digital marketing and state-by-state go-to-market strategy.

2. Create increasingly scalable operations through high quality and efficient volunteer onboarding, engagement, on-going training & support. Build out of data architecture and leveraging technology to maximize efficiencies.

3. Expand supporter base through multiple point of entry events held monthly to learn about our mission and vision along with ways to get involved.

4. Develop our state-by-state legal growth program to enhance attorney involvement through state supreme court recognition as legal aid, emeritus status, & CLE for attorneys.

5. Grow partnerships with local market organizations, multi-site church networks, and denominational/ thought leadership to promote & expand our footprint.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our Gospel Justice Centers serve individuals in the community who cannot afford access to civil legal guidance. Legal issues may include but not be limited to these areas of law: family, probate, immigration, tax, consumer, employment, housing, and criminal law. The vulnerable are 21% more likely to be abused; 47% more likely to experience financial, physical, and emotional loss; and 70% more likely to need public assistance.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As we receive feedback from our client experience survey, we have used that feedback to bolster our volunteer training by emphasizing the areas that our clients appreciate most and enhancing training in areas that need improvement, so that volunteers at our Gospel Justice Centers can provide high quality and responsive service to their neighbors in need. We have started passing along the client experience surveys to our centers in a timely manner so that client experiences can be celebrated and improvements can be made where needed.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback puts our clients in the driver’s seat. They are our main customer that we aim to serve. When they express satisfaction &/ or dissatisfaction over any area of their experience, we respond through improved communication & training with our volunteers through our internal commitment and process of operational excellence and continuous improvement.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Administer Justice

Board of directors
as of 10/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jim Charlton

Bruce Strom

Administer Justice

Joseph Abraham

BOSI

Tempia Courts

Pluymert, MacDonald, Hargrove & Lee

MaryAnne Mings

Suncast

Daniel Arnold

Exhibit Concepts

Jim Charlton

Alpha USA

Jennifer McHugh

Water Mission

Kevin Drendel

Drendel & Janson

LaVon Koerner

Retired, Revenue Storm

K Copeland

New Zion Baptist Church

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data