PLATINUM2022

H-Town Dream Center

Together, We Give Hope

Splendora, TX   |  www.htowndreamcenter.org

Mission

H-Town Dream Center is a faith-based 501(c)3 nonprofit faithfully serving Montgomery County and the Greater Houston Area. Our mission is to give hope, healing and freedom of Christ to the most vulnerable by helping break the chains of oppression and poverty so they can begin to dream again and become contributing members of society. This is made possible through our 3 pillars of impact: Feeding the Hungry through our Care & Share Food Pantry, Housing women and children in our Hope Center, and Mentoring at-risk youth through sports, recreation, and education in our Community Center.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank You for any support that you give to us and know that this support will be used to truly make an impact on the lives of others!

Ruling year info

2013

CEO/FOUNDER

Mrs. Shannon Nelson

Co Principal Officer

Miss Brooke Gaskamp

Main address

P.O. Box 2100

Splendora, TX 77372 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-3542551

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hope Center Discipleship Program

Through a one-year faith-based discipleship program, we house women and children and help them start a new life in Christ and in love give them the help they need. The H-Town Dream Center helps women learn how to grow in God, be a parent, give back to the community, learn how to have structure and function in everyday life. During the discipleship program the ladies live at the Dream Center campus free of charge. With all of their basic needs provided these women can then concentrate on becoming self-sufficient and ready to meet the demands of life after they graduate. The Discipleship program is also available for teens.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families
At-risk youth

We help expecting mothers and pregnant teenagers secure a brighter, more stable future for themselves and their babies. We provide pregnant women with a loving home, prenatal care, and education to have a healthy pregnancy, healthy environment to have a healthy baby.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

When teens come into our Renewed Youth Program addressing their immediate needs is our priority - warm meals, showers, beds, and a safe environment. On top of this, Renewed Youth involves so much more: it's also about building a foundation of safety and trust that's so often eroded by life on the streets, and restoring and building faith within Jesus Christ.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

The Care & Share Food Pantry, partnered with the Montgomery County Food Bank, distributes vital nutrition to those in the Montgomery County area. Single mothers, working poor families, disabled individuals, the unemployed, and the elderly who would otherwise have limited access to fresh, quality food, due to issues of cost and transportation are served.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

The East Texas Dream Center goes out into the community and surrounding apartment complexes and does street clean-up and lawn maintenance, helps others in need, delivers furniture and clothing, serves food, plays games with kids, prays for, loves on, and serves others. Adopt a Block focuses on meeting the spiritual and physical needs of the community. Teams of volunteers enter the community on Thursdays and Saturdays to provide nearly anything the community is in need of; making long-term, life-changing improvements to the communities that need it most.
The East Texas Dream Center has daily feedings for the homeless, and partners with other ministries every Saturday for feedings of over 200 homeless.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people

Related Program

Care & Share Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Care & Share Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Hurricane Harvey Relief Efforts

Pounds of Food Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Care & Share Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes Hurricane Harvey Relief efforts

Number of people reached with the Gospel of Jesus Christ

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adopt a Block Community Outreach

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of active missionaries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hope Center Discipleship Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The East Texas Dream Center's mission is to strategically partner with the community to provide programs which are designed to house women and children in need, feed the hungry, clothe the naked, restore the broken, and assist the homeless. With faith, hope and love we seek to lead individuals and families toward self-sufficiency so they can become contributing members of society.

The East Texas Dream Center's purpose is to reconnect isolated people to God and a community of support by providing human services that address immediate and long-term needs in the areas of homelessness, hunger relief, medical care and education. It is a place where the hurting, homeless, discouraged, depressed, frustrated, and the confused can find love and acceptance, guidance and encouragement.

The East Texas Dream Center has developed programs and services to meet the immediate needs of impoverished residents of Montgomery Country. Major funding comes from donations, public and private sources, corporations, and individuals.

The East Texas Dream Center serves people year-round through extensive programs and service outreaches such as, food distribution, a residential recovery program, a home for at-risk teens, assistance for victims of human trafficking and domestic violence, adult education, and emergency transitional housing for the homeless. In order to provide these comprehensive services a full-time, on-site staff base assists with day-to-day operations, as well as short-term volunteers who assist with large-scale outreaches. In addition to that, hundreds of local and community volunteers serve with the various outreaches.

Through the blessing of multiple volunteers and partnerships with other passionate organizations, the East Texas Dream Center is able to help homeless, low-income and working poor communities. The East Texas Dream Center staff and volunteers go out into the community on a weekly basis to help our struggling and hurting neighbors.

The East Texas Dream Center began official operations in 2013 and we have steadily increased our program size and program offerings through continuous support from family, local community,and generous individuals.

The East Texas Dream Center has been serving Montgomery County communities for over eight years now. Some of our outreach activities include weekly feedings for the homeless, distributing food for low-income families by hosting a bi-weekly public food drive and providing clothing, supplies and diapers for families in need. Our 12 month Discipleship program is designed to help women transform their lives by using the Word of God and provide classes to educate them in various life skills.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We are serving people in and around our community that cannot afford to put food on the table. We help relieve the related stress caused by simply being hungry. We serve women and children who are survivors of human trafficking, domestic abuse, addiction, and other crisis situations. We serve at-risk youth who need a safe place to go after school and during the summers. We serve these youth through our community center with sports, recreation, and educational programming.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    At the beginning of the year, we started an Adopt-A-Block outreach program at a commun in New Caney, Tx. We are there once a month setting up in the community park area. We set up tables and play faith-based games and provide food as well as items to help fill needs. Now we realized that this community was 85% Hispanic. We do not have a fluent Spanish speaking staff member. However, we felt compelled to reach every person we could at this outreach. So, we began actively seeking out Spanish speaking volunteers and within 30 days we had to Spanish speaking volunteers who have committed to being there the 1st Saturday of every month when we have this particular outreach. Our last outreach we had everyone that showed up could communicate their needs with us through the translator.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We feel that asking for feedback from those we serve has made our relationship with those we serve stronger and even more transparent. Asking for feedback on us as a whole opens up so many other doors when it comes to sharing. Once we have opened up a door the community tends to share even more of their needs. These needs can be very personal at times, so it is important to have an open dialogue.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

H-Town Dream Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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H-Town Dream Center

Board of directors
as of 09/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Shannon Nelson


Board co-chair

Mr. Shawn Nelson

Nelson Pools

Shannon Nelson

EAST TEXAS DREAM CENTER

James Pogue

Shawn Nelson

Nelson Pools

David Solimon

Milagros Solimon

Veronica Medlin

Angela Thorndyke

Home Depot

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/15/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.