PLATINUM2024

COMMON GOOD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

#WeAreCommonGood

LEXINGTON, KY   |  http://www.commongoodlex.org/

Mission

Our Mission: Common Good is an inclusive community in North Lexington dedicated to whole families. We create a safe space for our community to know love. Our Vision: We want to see thriving students, strong families and flourishing neighborhoods live into their God-given potential.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Laura Gallaher

Main address

1015 N LIMESTONE

LEXINGTON, KY 40505 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-3950421

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to 2019 US Census data, 9% of Fayette County residents lack a high school diploma. That number rises to 29% for residents in Lexington's North End. Countywide, 20% of children under 18 live below the poverty line. That jumps to 51% in the North End. Since 2012, Common Good has worked with families, schools, and the community to give North End children and youth an opportunity to overcome these odds. The schools our students attend have programs geared towards enhancing student engagement and increasing test scores. Very few programs offer students and families ongoing mentorship or wholistic assistance in removing barriers. 79% of our families are non-native English speakers, making access to services especially challenging. Common Good helps remove those barriers through programming focused on education, leadership development, enrichment activities, recreation, and spiritual formation, which cultivates thriving children, strong families, and flourishing neighborhoods.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our Programs

At Common Good we support the whole family, we want to see thriving students, strong families and flourishing neighborhoods live into their God-given potential.

Our After-School Program supports students in grades K - 12 during the school year. Students receive a nutritious meal, homework help, and opportunities to form positive bonds with peers and volunteer mentors. Our Summer Program provides a safe, supervised place for students to come during the summer months when school is not in session.

Mission Transition mentors students as they prepare for high school graduation. We meet with them weekly to walk alongside them as they make their next step.

Our Path Program mentors students after high school. This stage of life is full of directions to choose from, including continued higher education, vocational school, a career, or another route.

Our Family Support Program offers support to our families through advocacy, case management, parenting support, and career development.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Families
Children
Preteens
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2022, 15 students (four graduating seniors and 11 Common Good program graduates currently enrolled in college) were awarded a total of $68,000 in scholarships from donations made to Common Good

Number of students per teacher during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Common Good maintains an average 1:3 ratio of adult mentors to students in our program, which allows students with high needs to receive individualized attention.

Number of first-entry undergraduate program students who identify themselves as 'visible minorities'or 'non-white'

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of alumni (regardless of last date of enrollment) who submit updated contact information to the alumni office within the most recent academic year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of parents/guardians engaged in student activities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Common Good has 36 families representing 78 students. One parent or guardian from 15 different families serve on our Parent Leadership Team annually.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Common Good serves an average of 78 students per year which is our maximum capacity.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All Common Good students have access to positive adult role models through the staff, volunteer mentors and community partners.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Of Common Good's 48 mentors, 20 are mentors of color which is critical to the success of our program and is proven the most effective mentoring model by the National Mentoring Resource Center.

Number of youth who increased their weekly hours of homework/reading

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Elementary students receive 55 minutes of homework help and reading time daily, 4 days per week for 34 weeks per year. Middle and high school students receive 40 minutes per day.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

High school juniors and seniors meet regularly to learn of post-secondary educational opportunities. Seniors receive assistance with college and FAFSA applications. Metric is HS seniors only.

Number of high school graduates who are persisting in college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of scholars who earn a Bachelor's degree

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We currently have 17 students in college, seven students who have earned their Bachelor's degree, two who have earned an Associate's degree, and two who have earned their Master's degree.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Common Good wants to see thriving students, strong families and flourishing neighborhoods live into their God-given potential. Goals include:
Sense of security: Many Common Good families are in tenuous situations due to financial stress, immigration status, and/or trauma. Common Good provides a safe place where each student and his/her entire family feel welcomed.
Post-secondary opportunities: Common Good wants all students to know available options. Barriers are real, but so is the support system and ability to reach their goals. Common Good has 15 graduates currently pursuing post-secondary options; six have completed BAs, one has completed an AA and three are pursuing master’s degrees.
Increased academic performance: Common Good provides tutoring and accountability by checking students’ grades, behavior, and school attendance monthly.
Access to extracurricular opportunities: Common Good provides access to extracurriculars for students facing economic and/or transportation barriers. Elementary students participate in weekly club times, and older youth partner with the ACE (Architecture, Construction, Engineering) Mentor Program to enhance their awareness of careers in these industries.
Common Good defines success for students as being engaged in the program, attending regularly, desiring success for themselves, and making academic and social gains. More broadly, Common Good wants students and families to remain engaged in programming for years to come. A specific goal is for participants to willingly give back to the program. This long-term goal is being achieved. Common Good has hired three program graduates as staff; graduates and six current students serve as summer program employees every year; and a parent of Common Good graduates serves on the board.

Daily programming: Monday-Thursday, 2:40-6pm, 34 weeks/year. 74 students receive mentoring, educational enhancement, leadership development, recreational activities, and a daily meal. Program directors provide accountability by monitoring grades and attendance of all students.
Elementary Program Clubs: Three times/week for 34 weeks/year. Many students attend schools with limited extracurricular opportunities and most families cannot afford these privately. Common Goods club times rotate access to cooking, science, gardening, and art.
Mission Transition (College Readiness): Two hours/week for 34 weeks/year. High school juniors/seniors meet with staff/mentors to pursue post-high school opportunities. Many students in under-resourced neighborhoods, and particularly immigrant students, are not aware of opportunities and resources available to them, and most of them will be first-generation college graduates. Common Good provides support to families navigating the post-graduation process and ongoing mentorship for high school graduates in college, working, or still discerning next steps. In total, three graduates have joined Common Goods staff, one is currently employed at Common Good.
Parent Leadership Development: Two hours/month for eight months/year. Common Good provides parenting support, leadership development, and help with school communication. These meetings engage parents who might not be involved in school because of linguistic/cultural barriers.
Matchstick Goods: Common Goods social enterprise and economic development arm creates opportunities for Common Good students and graduates, including first/second generation immigrants, to express their unique and creative voices in their current cultural context. Students work 4-6 hours/week learning skills related to running a business and design/creation of ceramic goods.
Youth Employment: Common Good employs four students at Matchstick Goods during the school year and six students during the Summer Program.
Common Good programs are neighborhood-based and most clients receiving services live around or very near the programs physical location. Families pay $10 per school year per child for the after-school program and $10 per child for the six-week summer program. This contribution gives parents a buy-in without being cost prohibitive to anyone. Common Good does not financially screen participants, but staff awareness of participating families suggest 95% of families in the program live at or below the poverty level.
Mentoring and after-school programs that connect youth to caring adults and activities are strategies recommended by the CDC for the prevention of youth violence and associated risk behaviors.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

COMMON GOOD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

COMMON GOOD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Board of directors
as of 01/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Richard Grier

Rising Sun Development

Term: 2026 - 2023

Sarah McGinnis

Kris Winders

BBN Physical Therapy

Richard Grier

Rising Sun Development

Ben Miller

Sara Schuer

Dor'cas Kaindu

Common Good Graduate

Marishia Hamilton

Community Action Council and Parent

Emily Chambers

Republic Bank

Savannah Jones

PA-C, University of Kentucky Health

Dieumerci Isidor

Toyota

Marshall Wilmhoff

Hope Presbyterian Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/19/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/19/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.