The Drum Major Society Inc

Service. Awareness. Community.

Cincinnati, OH   |  www.drummajorsociety.org

Mission

To recognize Past, Present, and Future Drum Majors, wherever they may be for their contribution of excellence in maintaining the traditions of their institution.

1) To recognize Past, Present, and Future Drum Majors, wherever they may be for their
contribution of excellence in maintaining the traditions of their institution.

2) To assist in the cultivation and development of select scholarship funds, for future students.

3) To provide basic utility needs for the current Drum Majors throughout each
academic year.

4) To maintain an official training program through the Department of Bands to educate
current and future students as Drum Majors.

5) To create a social network for all Drum Majors to communicate and share experiences.

Ruling year info

2012

Executive Director

Nick DelleCave

Main address

2068 Knightsbridge Dr.

Cincinnati, OH 45244 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-4031325

NTEE code info

Leadership Development (W70)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

e continuously strive to reduce overall cost needs of students working in musical leadership roles in various organizations around the country. Financial strain is the largest contributing factor to lack of participation, quality equipment and financial assistance via scholarships.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Drum Major Society Training Certification

This training program is offered every winter to interested students at the collegiate level who wish to learn the art of conducting.

Population(s) Served
Young adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1) Service - We focus in all things on providing low to no cost educational support to students in the Cincinnati area. This service helps collegiate and high school level students with targeted instruction in conducting, leadership development, and the latest in music education techniques.

2) Awareness - We have a very deliberate and open social networking strategy to get the word out about events, opportunities and educational formats where various levels of student acumen can jump on board and learn. We are also using this pillar to demonstrate our commitment to cancer research and our support of local community events.

3) Community - The tie that binds is the all encompassing aspect in everything we do. From education in service, to having large social events in support of local causes, we focus exclusively on the development of our neighborhood. This strategy will continue to grow over the next 3-5 years as we look for expansion opportunities and grow our community from within.

1) Service - This virtue is delivered each year in a series of training classes we offer to local institutions. While the material continue to be refined, the students who participate in our sessions consistently rate us highly in all key areas of promotion with a focus on areas we can improve our offering. Students return year after year to the program to learn the latest methods and to get fresh new perspective.

2) Awareness - Getting the word out in a loud world of choices can be a challenge for any organization. Our niche in the Cincinnati market continues to expand into the local high schools arena, with social events and our 100+ Annual Gala event each December which is really ratcheting up participation.

3) Community - The Society is a member based and recognition Society along with our charter as a public charity. The combination of those types of giving are shown not just in dollars but in the good-will volunteerism instilled within the current Board of Directors.

In 2011 the Executive Director began a search to bring music educators onto the Board to focus our efforts in the education arena. Since then 3 local music educators have joined the Board and are assisting us in the development in methods I've mentioned. As the development continues to improve, so does the response of our students and the output of the group overall.

Generous donors also are an asset that continue to generate support for the organization. These countless few are real pioneers in our market and believe as we all do, in the vision of the organization. While our training assets are a free service with no compensation, our donors give so we can provide these experiences for no charge to those students who may not have the resources.

We also have sponsors that offer us discounts on services, food, and event space which allows us to host the kind of events we do. These gift in kind donations are really solid after years of mutual support and friendship.

The Plan's ultimate end is a robust Training and Scholarship offering to the public which will allow us to increase visibility in area schools.

We have had to adjust our marketing strategy over the course of time to be less reliant on our traditional collective past at specific institutions and to move our influence out into the real world so to speak. This change while good for overall business modeling has also given us some pause as it can be a slippery slope if not watched carefully.

Risks are numerous for a group our size, but we do have niche in the market in a very specific area of performance and music education that we believe makes us a good target for growth. The projection of that growth has been more than originally anticipated, but we continue to measure our success on how we translate that expansion into offerings and support dollars for operations and student need.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    High School & College aged students looking to learn musical leadership skills in an extracurricular environment.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Student feedback drives the curriculum we develop each year. That feedback then fosters new ways of approaching pedagogy and learning through new and fresh perspectives.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have always offered anonymous and direct feedback opportunities via the means indicated above. The goal is always to learn, grow and be more present and relevant as student tastes change over time.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Drum Major Society Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Drum Major Society Inc

Board of directors
as of 04/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nick DelleCave

Executive Director

Term: 2007 - 2018

Nick DelleCave

No Affiliation

Mitch Blesser

Ben Lozar

Isabelle Reynolds

John O'Toole

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/20/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.