Womens Centers International

Elevating the Power of Women

aka WCI   |   Oakland, CA   |  www.WomensCentersIntl.org

Mission

WCI creates safe gathering places for women affected by poverty and conflict, particularly women of color. A Center provides access to the knowledge, training, and support they need to build the better lives they desire.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Susan M Burgess-Lent

Main address

307 Lee St Ste 6

Oakland, CA 94610 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-4275269

NTEE code info

International Economic Development (Q32)

Management & Technical Assistance (Q02)

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The women who have registered at Baraka Women's Center live in Nairobi's slums and have little access to the kinds of information, training, and support that would allow them to advance out of their highly restrictive impoverished environments. The women face an array of challenges from earning income, to health issues, to single parenthood, to domestic and sexual violence. The programs at Baraka Women's Center have served over 1000 women in the past eight years, enabling hundreds of women to advance not only in foundational skills - reading and writing - but also in more advanced skills like Entrepreneurship, Table Banking, and Computer Training. Baraka Women's Center is unique in the breadth of its offerings and the way it integrates multiple services to enable women to build the self esteem and confidence that is the most significant casualty of poverty. The Center transforms lives by acknowledging and meeting the aspirations of women surviving for too long on the margins.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adult Education Program

Nine-month course for women with little or no formal education to develop literacy and to enable completion of primary education

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

16-week course for women in the basics of business development, management and growth.  Topics include goal setting,  product research and development, market research, financial record keeping, customer relations, business planning and sourcing funds.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

A five-month course of study on the skills required for employment in Hair and Beauty Salons.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

16-week course to develop basic fluency with using computers.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Marigold Grant 2012

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Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to build the capacity of Women's Centers to self-manage and to expand regionally.

Each Center becomes a hub of change for women; their increasing power ripples through not only families but local communities.

Each Center is like a base camp for strengthening women's lives and ability to influence change.


Our organizational strategy is to expand the use of the Women's Center Model nationally in Kenya, regionally in East Africa and the Middle East, and then globally


With over 16 years experience implementing the Women's Center Model, WCI is capable of orchestrating regional and eventually global adaptation of this innovation in services to vulnerable and marginalized women.

26 members employed by the Center in administration, teaching, and sewing;
121 women completed two series of Entrepreneur and Transformational Leadership (E&L) Training;
13 Women’s Table Banking Groups with over 300 members organized for saving and access to seed capital;
10 women trained as Adult Education teachers;
36 members completed the Functional Literacy Program;
40 registered and 26 completed a Computer Training Course and were certified;
Over 120 women and men engaged in awareness and planning workshops to address widespread sexual and domestic violence in the community;
80+ women trained in weekly workshops to reduce stress and depression;
24 members trained in HIV/AIDS awareness workshops;
Community screenings for HIV/AIDS and TB provided by MSF and the Ministry of Health;
BWC members displayed and sold products at four exhibitions sponsored by NGAAF;
BWC represented Kenya at an International Trade Fair in India in February 2020;
24 trainees completed two five-month Hair and Beauty Skills Training Course; 17 received training by the Ministry of Environment on proper handling of chemicals for hair styling.
Baraka Center has established a business to produce face masks for COVID-19 prevention. It has a contract with KEMSA
BWC is a member of two national trade organizations: the Kenya National Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KNCCI) and the Kenya National Federation of Jua Kali Associations (KNFJKA)

What's Next
Continue building Baraka Centers' business Baraka Mtido Textiles for pandemic response and for post-pandemic textile products.
Conduct the next iteration of courses in Vocational Training, Entrepreneur Training, and Health Education.

Re-open Oakland Women's Center to serve both former members and new women seeking services across the spectrum of their needs.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Africans and African Americans, women, ages 17 - 70 years

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    New policy manuals for member advocacy

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Womens Centers International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Womens Centers International

Board of directors
as of 06/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cassandra Clifford

Women's Centers International

Term: 2021 - 2023

Grant Williams

The Edge

Anne Mwangi

Marin Health

Victoria Tswamuno

Columbia School of Social Work

Cassandra Clifford

Self-employed

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/27/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability