The Lost & Found Association

Building resilient communities, today.

aka Lost&Found   |   SIOUX FALLS, SD   |  www.resilienttoday.org

Mission

Lost&Found facilitates comprehensive, data-driven, resilience-centered, public mental health strategies to prevent suicide among young adults (15-34). Our vision? A world in which no young adult considers or dies by suicide.

Ruling year info

2016

CEO/Executive Director

Mr. Erik W Muckey

Main address

PO BOX 1897

SIOUX FALLS, SD 57101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-4306370

NTEE code info

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today’s college student faces unprecedented risk for death by suicide. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young adults ages 15-34 in the United States. Suicide took 12,438 lives in this age bracket in 2015 alone, and the rate of has continued to increase since 1999. The economic impact of one life lost to suicide—$1,329,553—gives an idea of how suicide leaves such incredible human potential unrealized. Increasing suicide deaths are not the only problems facing campuses, however. The 2015 Center for Collegiate Mental Health Annual Report revealed that university counseling centers saw a 30% increase in usage over 5 years, despite average institutional enrollment growing by only 5%. In addition risk and protective factors for suicide risk risk and protective factors for suicide are not universally agreed upon by practitioners. These two issues place unprecedented burden on campus and community leaders that cannot be solved with current approaches in public mental health.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Student Prevention Programs

Lost&Found partners with colleges and universities to deliver innovative, student-centered, actionable programs that make resilient communities possible. We train advocates to support the mental health of their peers through three signature programs, reaching >10,000 students in two states

- Lost&Found Campus Chapters: Creating opportunities for student mental health advocates to promote and support local mental health resources.
- Peer2Peer Mentorship Programs: Partners student mentors with peers on college campuses who are needing additional support navigating college life, providing an assist to overburdened campus counseling centers and helping students meet their mental health needs in a safe, confidential environment.
- L&F Advocates Certificate Program: Training young adults (15-34) to advocate for their mental health, the mental health of others, and for broader community mental health programs, completed in a free, evidence-based certificate program offered by Lost&Found.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Adolescents
Students
Teachers
At-risk youth

Lost&Found applies public health, suicide prevention, and program evaluation expertise to conduct needs assessments, measure community suicide prevention capacity, and provide outsourced program evaluation services focused on our core mission: preventing suicide among young adults (15-34).

Our uniquely innovative program offerings, like the Campus Resilience Index (CRI), help our programs staff better understand a community's unique strengths for suicide prevention and offer guidance on evidence-based practices for community suicide prevention. This informs both people and programs, making communities more resilient over time.

We currently support a wide array of communities in South Dakota, Minnesota, and the surrounding region, as well as the tribal nations with whom these states share borders. Our services are open to support throughout the United States and Canada.

Population(s) Served

Lost&Found connects the communities we serve with relevant, evidence-based information, education, training, and coalition-building tools that can help prevent suicide and raise awareness of mental health needs.

Programs include education & training offerings provided digitally and in-person, as well as community prevention strategy efforts that work with local, state, and federal officials and collaborators to enact more effective suicide prevention strategies for young adults (15-34) and their immediate support networks.

In short: we work actively to defragment the mental health and suicide prevention ecosystem through education, training, content creation, and policy, all focused on our core mission of preventing young adult suicide.

Population(s) Served
Academics
Families
Adults
Academics
Families
Adults
Parents
At-risk youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Related Program

Student Prevention Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Lost&Found focuses on five key goals as part of its latest strategic planning efforts (Nov. 2019):

1) We will reach at least 30% of young adults 14-35 in communities where Lost&Found chapters are present through education, referrals, training, social media content, and events.

2) >90% of young adults engaging with Lost&Found programs will report a positive experience, and >60% will report increase resilience skills after participating in L&F training or skill development programs.

3) We will create a strong chapter system with clear goals for student leaders and a consistent feedback loop between chapter leaders, L&F staff, and community and campus stakeholders involved in addressing mental health needs of young adults in communities where chapters are present.

4) We will develop an understanding of an relationship with community-wide mental health infrastructure in communities where chapters are present to ensure resources are widely available and integrated to meet the needs of young adults.

5) We will contribute meaningfully to decline in suicide deaths among young adults ages 14-35 over the course of 5, 10, and 20 year increments in South Dakota, Minnesota, North Dakota and any other state where Lost&Found programs are present.

Getting help to young adults struggling with suicide ideation and its close cousin, depression, requires solutions that are approachable, destigmatizing, and designed to meet individual needs with scalable processes. Lost&Found was created in 2010 by a group of incoming University of South Dakota students passionate about this concept, seeing gaps in resources available in South Dakota and nationwide.

First and foremost, Lost&Found’s efforts to end suicide for young adults 14-35 centers around student organizations raising awareness of suicide’s impact on peers. Similar to the reasons why Greek organizations on college campuses continue to experience steady growth, Lost&Found chapters experience growth because chapter members regularly express a strong desire to make a difference in the lives of their peers. As a result, our established student chapters have developed a foundational network of local partnerships and sufficient working capacity to deliver awareness programming. Lost&Found recognizes that awareness alone does not meet the demands of the issues we seek to resolve, and that is why don't simply stop at words. True to our history as an organization, we "do more" to address suicide in our communities.

Unique to any mental health student organization around the country, Lost&Found will build partnerships with campus and community leaders to research local prevention needs, provide the financial and tactical support to implement solutions, and advise student leaders connecting peers with skill development and training and mental health resources. These efforts, led by a team of public health and student affairs professionals, focus on delivering regular needs assessments and a set of validated community resilience indicators to guide local decision-making.

Finally, and perhaps most important to increasing our impact, Lost&Found will seek to connect communities with validated training where leaders or organizations are seeking to improve mental health outcomes for young adults. These steps focus on the gap currently seen in the prevention sector: a resilience-oriented focus and tailoring resources to local needs.

Lost&Found was founded by students, for students, and its origins as a student organization advocating for reduced mental health stigma and suicide prevention programs remains at the core of its work today.

Leveraging its 10 years of experience delivering student mental health advocacy and education programs, Lost&Found brings a team of high-powered student affairs, public health, program evaluation, and communications and policy staff to help students continue Lost&Found's work and expand it to include new Evaluation Services and Training & Development programs.

Thanks to the support of newfound financial supporters and a wealth of partnerships spanning the suicide prevention and mental health services field, Lost&Found brings community-centered, systems-focused practices to its prevention efforts. Learning time and again the importance of creating programs that are rooted in the experience of those we serve -- young adults -- Lost&Found's capacity for understanding how to meet the mental health needs of young adults is evident in our long-term partnerships, ability to raise funds for community partners, and the satisfaction of the students and advisers we work with.

Lost&Found has grown rapidly between 2017 and 2020, increasing program impact from 500 students reached to over 5,000 anticipated reached in 2020 alone (and likely more). Funding has increased from $3K in annual budget to almost $300K in 2020, and staffing capacity has followed, growing from 0.5 FTE to 4.5 FTE in the same timeframe. Lost&Found's campus footprint has grown from 2 campuses to 5 and counting, with over 100 student leaders involved in day-to-day program development and management in eastern South Dakota.

Ultimately, our impact starts and finishes with young adults connecting with the resources they need to support their mental health needs. Each day, Lost&Found hears new stories from students across the state of South Dakota and around the country that inspire us to continue our work. No matter where these young adults land on the mental health spectrum, we know that Lost&Found makes a difference -- one life at a time.

In the age of COVID-19, Lost&Found's programs have moved to almost exclusively digital offerings, providing a variety of content over email, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube. Since March 2020, Lost&Found has reached over 500K people of all ages on social media with its mental health programming, engaging thousands of young adults who may not have otherwise been reached on a college campus.

In short: Lost&Found has grown dramatically and among its easier-to-measure metrics, our team recognizes that impact is happening. As we continue our work over the next 3 years under our Resilience Program Framework, we expect more visibility into the ultimate impact our work has -- giving new perspective on how to address mental health conditions in our communities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Lost&Found conducts "Voice of Student" reviews each semester to ensure our chapter leadership practices and training bring out the best in our mental health advocates. After receiving feedback that chapter leaders sought out more direction and guidance on program implementation from our staff, Lost&Found created a digital, comprehensive training platform for student leaders to not only access video training at any time, but also find handy "how-to" guides for navigating the world of student organizations. Student chapter leaders expressed their high support and praise for the new tools, and as a result, chapters experienced both increases in enthusiasm and efficacy in delivering mental health programs in fall 2020.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

The Lost & Found Association
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Lost & Found Association

Board of directors
as of 2/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Anne Kelly

Dakota Wesleyan University

Term: 2020 - 2022

Tom Parker

Limestone Consulting

Anna Hyronimus

Workday

Sandra Melstad

SLM Consulting

Nicholas Maddock

Capital One

Anne Kelly

Dakota Wesleyan University

Kacey McCarthy

Maximizing Excellence

Kimberly Grieve

University of South Dakota

Frank Arpan

Sisseton Wahpeton College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/04/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.