LA GONAVE HAITI PARTNERS INC

Atlanta, GA   |  www.lagonavepartners.org

Mission

MISSION: Haitian and American partners, working side by side in mutually-transformative relationships, to build vibrant, hopeful, and resilient communities on the island of la Gonâve. VISION: A future where everyone on la Gonâve experiences thriving, abundant life.

Notes from the nonprofit

La Gonave Haiti Partners is committed to a long term relationship with the people of La Gonave. We believe in good community development, not aid. We believe that sound development only occurs when there is mutual trust. The collaborative initiatives on La Gonave are based on the desire to respond effectively to the needs, interests and assets of the people who live on the island – individuals who can best articulate how organizations like the partnership can make a constructive difference in their lives. The organization is committed to building the human infrastructure on the island and, as such, only employs Haitians. The organization also seeks to partner with other NGOs operating in country and on the island to avoid duplication, to leverage resources, and to share best practices.

Ruling year info

2013

Chair

Jennell Elizabeth Charles

Main address

2461 Peachtree Rd NE

Atlanta, GA 30305 USA

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EIN

45-4713623

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (T01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Building the capacity of Haitians living on la Gonâve island for renewed opportunities at a quality life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Education

The partnership supports 10 schools within the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti on the island of Gonâve. Nine of the schools include pre-Kindergarten (3 year old students) through grade 6. One school, St. Francis d'Assisi, continues through middle and upper school. The enrollments range from approximately 100 students in the smaller schools to more than 450 students at St. Francis for a total of 1600-1700 students across the parish schools. The curriculum taught in the schools is prescribed by the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti and meets or exceeds the requirements of Haiti's Ministry of Education. Partners provide the money for administrative costs, teachers’ salaries, teacher training, school uniforms, school furniture, textbooks & supplies, and a school lunch program 5 days/week. A new middle school is under construction to provide youth living in rural communities improved access to 7-9th grades.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Begun in 2010, the adult literacy program has expanded from a handful of students in one community to 324 students in 13 communities. Creole, three levels of French, and now mathematics is being taught and coordinated by teachers and lay leaders of the communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The program serves a hot, nutritious meal every school day to each child in the ten schools supported by the partnership. Thirty cooks begin preparing their outdoor fires each morning at dawn and serve more than 325,000 lunches each school year. For many children, it is their only meal of the day. School attendance is improved and educational achievement is enhanced.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The project has trained more than 350 farmers in goat husbandry since 2003. New farmers begin their enrollment in the program with two days of training in the care and breeding of goats. At graduation, each farmer receives a pregnant doe. Farmer families attend regular veterinary clinics led by the Haitian program manager. Their goats receive vitamins and are treated with medicines when sick. Beginning in 2020, a new "Kid for a Kid" program was started modeled after a similar program on Haiti's mainland. The youngest child of the neediest families receives a kid goat to raise and breed as a source of food and revenue for the family.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children

Since 2008, MicroFinance loans have assisted recipients to start new endeavors or expand existing businesses without the burden of collateral. Goods sold have included rice, beans, flour, sugar, bread, oils, charcoal, cooking utensils, household sundries, personal care items, shoes, clothes, gas, cell phones, and cards for cell phones. As of 2021, the program has expanded to include families in all 10 communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The program addresses mild to severe malnutrition in young children living in remote areas of the island. Once identified, they are treated with Medika Mamba, a ready to eat nutrient-enriched food supplement in a peanut base. The product is produced in Haiti with peanuts grown by Haitian farmers. Nurses divide and distribute small, single serving packages for the children. Average treatment time is 4-6 weeks.

Population(s) Served
Children
Infants and toddlers

The Bill Rice Community Health Center is located in the community of Nouvelle Cité and is the hub for all partnership healthcare programs. Health care services are provided by a medical director, a social-year physician, and a 9-member professional staff, including two trained birth attendants. The Center is designated as a Ministry of Health site and houses a pharmacy, a laboratory, a small ward for overnight patients, and a labor and delivery room. Women who are pregnant for the first time are encouraged to delivery at the health center. The Center provides a primary care clinic on week days and specialty clinics with visiting US medical teams; access to healthcare services are available 7 days/week, 24-hours/day.

As part of the Center's services, 22 trained community health workers provide the first line of healthcare services for people living in remote mountain communities. They are equipped with backpacks that include basic medical equipment and supplies, and first aid items. In addition, approximately 16 matrones (traditional birth attendants) are key staff in monitoring women who are pregnant; matrones attend most deliveries which occur in the home. Both the community health workers and matrones meet monthly at the Center to learn about emergency and public health issues, maternal and infant care, child health care, family planning, and nutrition.

Mobile outreach services are also provided by staff of the Bill Rice Center. On a weekly basis medical and prenatal clinics are held in communities across the island. Follow-up care for the mother and baby continues through the first year of the child's life. The team works in collaboration with the community health workers and matrones to provide, medical, prenatal and postnatal care.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Health
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of adults who received literacy services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Adult Literacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Provided by the Adult Literacy Coordinator

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total Revenue

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Health care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of children treated for acute malnutrition

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Children's Nutrition Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of sexually active females receiving reproductive health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults

Related Program

Health care

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who perform at average or above on standardized testing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Schools closed early during the 2019-2020 academic year due to COVID 19. Testing was conducted during Aug, Sept, & Oct of 2020.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The La Gonâve Haiti Partnership is a community development partnership between the people of La Gonâve, the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti and the United States Partners. We work together on:
Education
Healthcare
Nutrition
Agriculture
Water
Economic Opportunity

It is our practice to partner with Haitian organizations based in Haiti and employ Haitians whenever possible. This helps build human capacity and foster sustainable growth in Haiti.

Development is done in partnership with the people of La Gonâve, employing local people and using locally made goods and materials. While US partners identify resources and often provide workshops and educational opportunities, the projects themselves belong to the people of La Gonâve. This addresses the issue of economic development in a way that traditional aid does not --by building sustainable communities and an educated workforce.

Our commitment is to accompany the people of La Gonâve, Haiti on their journey to economic independence.

Our goal is to support the development of their capabilities so they can improve their lives though better health care, education, and economic opportunity.

To the extent possible, we collaborate with other NGOs and organizations in Haiti and on the island of La Gonâve to avoid duplication of services and implement "best practice" strategies. We believe in providing training and continuing education for the Haitians in charge of critical programs that build human capacity. In addition, we strive to maintain relationships through ongoing communications. In a typical year, U.S. teams visit the island approximately 18-20 times/year to continue conversations about what programs are working, what barriers and challenges need to be addressed, and new strategies to try. With the 2020 pandemic, these visits have not been possible. To ensure these conversations continue, communications via "What's App", virtual conferences involving U.S. and Haitian partners, and written reports of program activities sent via email by the Haitian leadership have been effective in tracking program outcomes.

For over 30 years, La Gonâve Haiti Partnership has worked closely with the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti and the Episcopal Priest in charge of the parish of St. Francois d'Assise on La Gonave. The Partnership includes 19 U.S. church partners (Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Anglican, Methodist) located in 7 states and over 500 individual, corporate, and other nonprofit donors. One church partner primarily supports the Bill Rice Community Health Center and its initiatives; all other church partners works closely with one of 10 communities building relationships between churches and communities in support of multiple community-based programs. These programs include schools, school lunch programs, adult literacy programs; healthcare outreach through community health workers, matrones, and mobile prenatal and medical clinics; economic development programs through microcredit loans and goat & agricultural projects; and infrastructure projects. Infrastructure programs include support for building churches and schools, latrines, cisterns, and repairing and maintaining existing structures. We research and locate in-country resources and provide funding and human resources to assist with these projects. All projects occur at the direction and under the leadership of the Haitian communities. All employed staff involved in these projects are Haitian staff.

Over the past 5 years, there has been much progress made in each of the 4 major program areas. Schools have remained open during the 2020-2021 academic year with over 1600 children and youth enrolled in 10 schools. Handwashing stations have been created at each school to address the pandemic crisis. A new middle school is under construction with good progress being made towards the target opening date of September 2021. The adult literacy program has grown in number of participants and number of communities involved. The curriculum has also expanded to include higher levels of French, and now, mathematics. The healthcare program continues to provide basic primary care services and outreach to a larger percentage of the population with increased emphasis on outreach to pregnant women and children 1-3 years of age at risk for malnutrition. Training of community health care workers and matrones occurs monthly by the Haitian physician and nursing staff of the Bill Rice Community Health Center. This Center is also a Ministry of Health Designated site for training of medical personnel. The number of individuals receiving microcredit loans has increased with distribution expanded to new communities. One of the most successful and longest running programs has been the goat program. This program has generated both a revenue stream and critical food source for hundreds of families across la Gonâve. The program was expanded in 2020 to include a "Kid for a Kid" program using an established curriculum where a child of the neediest families receives a kid goat to care for and raise. Last, a number of infrastructure projects have begun, others are nearing completion, and still others have been completed over the last several years. These have included new classrooms, school playgrounds, kitchens, cisterns, latrines, security walls, a church, and a worship pavilion. Again, all projects are the result of the collaboration between US and Haitian partners with community- and parish-based leadership providing coordination and tracking of all project activities and outcomes.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    La Gonâve Haiti Partners works in partnership with the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti to specifically support the St. Francis d'Assisi parish located on the island of la Gonâve, Haiti. The parish extends across 10 communities scattered across the island. Nine of these communities are located in isolated mountain villages; the largest is located in the capital city of Anse-a-Galet. Together, U.S. and Haitian partners serve all age groups through four major program areas--education, healthcare, economic development, and infrastructure.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Ten years ago a young woman attending a partnership-sponsored community meeting in a rural community shyly raised her hand and expressed a desire to learn how to read and write just like her children were learning these skills in school. Supported with partnership funding, within six months the first adult literacy class was born using a curriculum developed on mainland Haiti. Today, this program has students from 13 different communities. Haitian educators working in parish schools now teach an adult curriculum they themselves developed that includes coursework in Creole, French, and mathematics.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By encouraging feedback and then, more importantly, listening to our Haitian partners, the Board continually challenges itself to be inclusive and reflective regarding the activities of the organization and the communities served. The work of the organization is shaped by the priority needs of the Haitian communities, coordinated, and managed by the leadership at the community and parish levels. Our mission and vision provide the foundation for understanding that La Gonâve Haiti Partners is a partnership between U.S. individuals and faith-based organizations, and the communities of la Gonâve. The feedback we get from our Haitian neighbors is critical in maintaining this balance and working collaboratively on projects perceived as most urgent by those living on la Gonâve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Translation of responses that may not reflect a true reflection of concern or need.,

Financials

LA GONAVE HAITI PARTNERS INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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LA GONAVE HAITI PARTNERS INC

Board of directors
as of 3/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennell Charles

La Gonâve Haiti Partners

Term: 2020 - 2022

Claire Barry

Fernandina Beach, FL

Alison Caughman

Atlanta, GA

Tryggvi Arnason

Rector, St. Alban's Episcopal Church, Hickory, NC

Dave Logeman

Director of Digital Strategy & Innovation at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, GA

Miles Barkley

Principal/Broker; Lee & Associates Charleston, Charleston, SC

Ginny Thaxton

Family Nurse Practitioner, Retired, Charleston, SC

Jennell Charles

PhD, RN; JEC Consulting--Healthcare Workforce, Health System Initiatives, Nellysford, VA

Bob Scarr

Consultant, Delta Airlines, Atlanta, GA

Meredith Moseley

Director, Shallowford Presbyterian School, Atlanta, GA

Barbara Robertson

Physician with speciality in Radiology, Atlanta, GA

Randy Schiltz

t-Olive Properties, LLC; Magnolia Residential Properties, LLC, Alpharetta, GA

Ann Waddle

PhD, Consultant--Education Initiatives, Clarksville, TN

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/20/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/19/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.