PLATINUM2024

Armory Youth Project

Empowering the Youth of Manistee County

aka Armory Youth Project   |   Manistee, MI   |  www.armoryyouthproject.com

Mission

Our mission is to provide a safe environment where young people can build community and be encouraged in their educational, emotional, physical, and Christian spiritual development.

Ruling year info

2016

Executive Director

Janice Davidson

Main address

555 1st Street

Manistee, MI 49660 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-4756059

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to Afterschool Alliance, the peak time for juvenile crime in Michigan during school days is 2 pm to 6 pm with 27% of juvenile crimes occurring during this time. Research shows that afterschool programs reduce crime, boost academics, improve behavior, lead to healthier habits, and reduce costs. Manistee faces challenges like poverty, underperforming schools, and limited youth resources, with an average household income 24% below the national average. The youth-oriented approach aims to reverse these economic trends, starting with youth. Recognizing the evolving needs and post-pandemic challenges facing Manistee's youth, the AYP is implementing an evidence-based model to serve the community better. This involves adopting proven, customizable models, staff training in social-emotional support, volunteer development, and program review. Data and program management support will enable us to monitor and improve our programming effectively.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Out of School Time and Summer Programs

The Armory Youth Project (AYP) is a 501c3 non-profit that provides OST (Out of School Time) programs for Manistee County Youth in 6th-12th grade. According to Afterschool Alliance, the peak time for juvenile crime in Michigan during school days is 2 pm to 6 pm with 27% of juvenile crimes occurring during this time. Research shows that afterschool programs reduce crime, boost academics, improve behavior, lead to healthier habits, and reduce costs. We focus on the whole individual offering classes and sports activities to encourage a healthy mind and body, life skills and teambuilding. We also focus on building relationships with our kids so that we earn the right to mentor to help them build confidence, self-awareness, and respect for others. Our facility does afford us the unique capability to provide physical, educational, and nutritional activities all under one roof. We strive to partner with others to leverage this capability coupled with the strengths of other organizations.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Preteens

Related Program

Out of School Time and Summer Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2023-602 Unique Students checked in 6614 times. 2022-354 Unique students checked in 3934 times. 2021-216 Unique students checked in 2400 times.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By providing year-round structured Out of School Time, the Armory Youth Project is providing the youth of Manistee County a safe place to find supportive friendships, receive educational opportunities, learn life skills, and so much more. The impact on the young people we serve will help them succeed through their teenage years and adulthood.

The youth-oriented approach aims to reverse these economic trends, starting with youth. Recognizing the evolving needs and post-pandemic challenges facing Manistee's youth, the Armory Youth Project is implementing an evidence-based model to serve the community better. This involves adopting proven, customizable models, staff training in social-emotional support, volunteer development, and program review. Data and program management support will enable us to monitor and improve our programming effectively.

Our goal is to offer services and programs that are not in conflict with other programs in the community. Our facility does afford us the unique capability to provide physical, educational, and nutritional activities all under one roof. We strive to partner with others to leverage this capability coupled with the strengths of other organizations.

We focus on the whole individual offering classes and sports activities to encourage a healthy mind and body, life skills and teambuilding. We also focus on building relationships with our kids so that we earn the right to mentor to help them build confidence, self-awareness, and respect for others.
Our goal is to offer services and programs that are not in conflict with other programs in the community. Our facility does afford us the unique capability to provide physical, educational, and nutritional activities all under one roof. We strive to partner with others to leverage this capability coupled with the strengths of other organizations.

Programs include FREE:
Nutritional snacks or meals during their session or camp
Access to trained volunteers and mentors who care about their well-being
Opportunities to seek support for their social-emotional wellbeing
Educational support
Transportation via Dial A Ride

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Armory Youth Project
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Armory Youth Project

Board of directors
as of 02/09/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Michelle May


Board co-chair

Michael Hudak

Shellee T. Seymour

Retired

Michelle May

Consultant

Emmersyn Sheaks

Realtor

Valarie Bergstrom

Retired

Michael Hudak

Retired

Patricia Lynett

Retired

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.