PLATINUM2024

Policy Center for Maternal Mental Health

Catalyzing Change in Maternal, Child and Family Wellbeing

aka 2020 Mom   |   Los Angeles, CA   |  https://www.policycentermmh.org

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Mission

Our mission is to close gaps in Maternal Mental Health care so every mother, child and family has the opportunity to thrive.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are catalyzing the field of maternal mental health. (We were officially recognized by Bridgespan in 2023 as a field catalyst.) One in five women will suffer, and less than 50% receive treatment and support. We close gaps by conducting research and identifying pathways for change, convening cross-sector change agents (through our annual FORUM and webinars), producing, new annual state report cards, and providing, technical assistance to state agencies, non-profits, and others.

Ruling year info

2013

Founder & Executive Director

Joy Burkhard

Director of Operations

Kelly Nielson

Main address

5101 Santa Monica Blvd Ste 8-326

Los Angeles, CA 90029 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-5009704

NTEE code info

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One in five U.S. women will suffer from a mental health disorder during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Though the majority of them have health insurance coverage, only 15% will receive some form of treatment. Multiple barriers and solutions exist, that 2020 Mom has been instrumental in identifying and lifting up. These opportunities include: -Mental health provider shortages -Gaps in obstetrician provider training -Behavioral health insurance being "carved-out" of medical insurance -Need for care coordination/case management -Insurers declining qualified mental health providers access to their networks -Insurers dragging out or denying approval of appropriate care -Lack of measurement and accountability of providers delivering of a standard of care -Need for outpatient and inpatient hospital programs -Distrust of the health care system by Black/Brown mothers

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Maternal Mental Health FORUM

One of the ways the Policy Center carries out our mission is by hosting the annual Maternal Mental Health FORUM to bring together cross-sector payers, including payors/insurers, state and federal government agencies, providers/hospital administrators, professional associations & others to share the latest data and research, public policy solutions, provider practice approaches, and community-based organization programs.

Since the first FORUM held in 2012, attendance has grown to nearly 1000 participants a year.

The convening informs, inspires, and connects people and ideas to propel, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment rates so mothers, babies and families have the foundation to thrive.

Population(s) Served

The Policy Center is known as the go-to organization for information about barriers and solutions to improving the diagnosis and treatment of maternal mental health disorders. This includes understanding and collating complex information about health care policy, health and mental health care delivery/financing, and federal and state law.

In 2023, we published the Inaugural Maternal Mental Health Report Card, grading the U.S. and individual states on their efforts to address MMH.

We create fact sheets and briefs on critical topics like Screening and Detection and Certified Peer Support Specialists, Maternal Suicide, and Family Planning.

These reports are shared via webinars/Congressional briefings, speaking engagements, blog posts, infographics and earned media.

Population(s) Served

After convening a multi-stakeholder task force with the support of the legislature and private funders in California we published the task force's report and national and state recommendations. This ultimately led to the introduction of legislation and the passage of the most comprehensive set of maternal mental health laws in the country.

To support other states we developed a toolkit for commissions and task forces, model legislation and created learning collaboratives for state agencies and non-profit organizations, called our "Policy Fellows"
Our fellows have advanced state policy in FL, UT, AZ, PR, MT, LA, TX and more.

We have also led federal policy efforts, including a coalition that passed the Bringing Postpartum Depression Out of the Shadows Act, secured funding for the first HHS maternal mental health report to Congress, the Introduction of the Moms Matter Act and Introduction and passage of the TRIUMPH for New Moms Act which formed the Maternal Mental Health Task Force.

Population(s) Served

Recognizing the value of mothers who have suffered from a mental health disorder, in supporting other mothers, the Policy Center for Maternal Mental Health has served as a catalyst for professionalizing the field, and aims to integrate state-certified peer support specialists into community-based and obstetric settings. This is critical in supporting stigma reduction, augmenting behavioral health treatment shortages and expanding obstetric providers' capacity to educate expecting moms and to screen/detect these disorders. All states now have state-sanctioned peer support training and certification programs in place. Most state Medicaid agencies, but not all reimburse for mental health peer support. Our work includes piloting training and integration, researching state policy gaps and leading the related state policy work with applicable nonprofit partners, researching and sharing Medicaid/Insurance billing information, and developing a center of excellence to scale implementation.

Population(s) Served
Unemployed people
Women and girls

Until recently, the U.S. maternal mental health has largely fallen under the radar, with the exception of media coverage about postpartum depression. The true gravity of the problem in the U.S. was not understood, because there was no system for measuring:
(1) whether the healthcare system delivered a standard of care,
( 2) how many women were identified as suffering from a maternal mental health disorder by a health care professional,
(3) how many maternal suicides were happening

We propelled the development of new U.S. healthcare system measures to determine how many women have been screened/identified by a healthcare professional and whether they developed treatment plans/follow-up (HEDIS Measures).

Further, we have been working with the CDC to ensure maternal suicide rates are being reported, and have successfully advocated for national reporting.

We are tracking the roll-out sharing the results and identifying barriers/pathways to improving the results.

Population(s) Served
Pregnant people
Activists
Women and girls
Pregnant people
Activists
Women and girls
Academics

Where we work

Awards

Named 2020 Mom a Field Catalyst 2023

Bridgespan Group

Affiliations & memberships

Independent Sector Member 2024

Mental Health Liaison Group 2024

Health Care Transformation Task Force 2024

Consumers for Quality Care 2023

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of convenings hosted by the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people, Young adults, Young women, Activists

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of external speaking requests for members of the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Pregnant people, Young women

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is a health care system that routinely detects and treats maternal mental health disorders for every mother, every time. Our goals center around three focus areas: 1. Availability of Providers, 2. Appropriate Screening, and 3. Ample Coverage.

Availability of Providers
Goal: A broad range of qualified maternal mental health providers, so evidence-based care options are readily available to mothers in the U.S. This includes the use of state-certified peer support specialists who can support mothers emotionally through various modes, including text messaging and offer care coordination -assisting mothers with finding in-network mental health providers, for example. This also includes ensuring mental health insurers include adequate numbers of qualified maternal mental health providers in the network and promote and pay for provider-to-psychiatrist consultations. Additionally, mothers must have access to treatment programs along the continuum, not just a mental health office visit or the ER -inpatient treatment programs for mothers and outpatient hospital programs are needed.

Appropriate Screening (Testing)
Goal: Obstetric providers (Ob/Gyns, Midwives, and Family Practice Doctors) adopt a standard protocol for screening using research-validated testing like "screening" questionnaires. We believe that screening should occur early so interventions and care can be implemented quickly. We also believe that screening must be comprehensive to "do no harm" (i.e., incorrect diagnosis, prescribing harmful treatment, or inappropriately sending a mother to the ER). Mothers should be screened for the range of maternal mental health disorders, not just depression. This includes but isn't limited to anxiety, maternal OCD/"intrusive thoughts," and bipolar disorder in certain circumstances. Finally, measurement, reporting, and oversight must be in place to ensure appropriate screening is happening universally for all mothers.

Ample Coverage
Goal: Private insurers and Medicaid plans provide timely access to in-network providers and care without requiring mothers and those who support them to jump through hoops. This includes the promotion of payment reform to support mental health integration in obstetric/primary care and addressing benefit coverage limitations, utilization management prohibitions, and provider network restrictions.

Our Strategies: The Four Cs. Our strategies are bucketed into four categories: 1. Craveable Content, 2. Communities of Practice, 3. Co-Laboratory Projects and Collaborations and 4.

Craveable Content
This strategy builds on 2020 Mom’s track record of curating and communicating cutting-edge content to those we serve. This content is centered around the development of issue briefs and bi-annual “State of Maternal Mental Health in America” reports. Distribution of such content occurs through our annual conference the "Maternal Mental Health FORUM" webinars, blogs, external conference presentations, infographics (including graphic illustrations), storytelling, and social media memes and messaging.

Communities of Practice
We connect change agents working to solve the same problems or who work in similar settings to learn how to close gaps in maternal mental health care efficiently, and together. These communities may include our state non-profit policy fellowship and state and territory public health fellowship programs and the further development of the maternal mental health LinkedIn groups, for example. Certain communities of practice may center around the adoption of the 2020 Mom “Whole Mom” hospital, insurer best practice standards, and checklists.

Co-Laboratory & Collaborations
Our Co-Laboratory is where implementation science comes to life. We experiment and test ideas with partners to find solutions that work (and don’t work). We iterate on learnings and promote wide-scale adoption of solutions that work. We collaborate with critical stakeholder organizations to support the adoption and scaling of solutions. Examples include our collaborations to lift up and propel the use of state-certified peer support specialists to close provider shortage gaps and provide women with just-in-time and welcoming support. Another example is our collaboration with the International OCD Foundation to develop resources for providers to better detect maternal OCD, and invest in research to improve diagnosis and treatment.

Commanding Action
Commanding Action means 2020 Mom will actively push for the adoption of solutions among stakeholder groups. Strategic tactics can include letters, petitions, legislative and legal solutions. Examples include 2020 Mom introducing and passing legislation in California to require obstetricians to screen, and introducing the TRIUMPH for New Moms Act in Congress that calls for the creation of a national strategic plan, coordination of federal agency resources and programs, and recommendations to governors and state legislatures on state-level policy solutions.


We understand the complex U.S. healthcare system.
We are skilled at research and writing and sharing complex problems in easy-to-understand framing.
We have a broad network of cross-sector partners and we are naturals at convening this network in conference and webinar settings.
We understand health policy including the regulatory (state and federal government agency) and statutory/legislative process.
We center the mother in all that we do by lifting up stories to paint a picture of complex problems and their solutions.

We began this work in 2011 when maternal mental health was simply referred to as “postpartum depression” and when the healthcare system was silently failing tens of thousands of mothers and families in the U.S. a year.

In our first ten years, we focused on introducing the problem and framing "maternal mental health" to key partners and the public. We also focused on identifying and sharing barriers and pathways to change.

Our approaches included:
engaging critical cross-sector stakeholders,
coalescing non-profit partners
identifying best practices
creating tools to support change-agents
launching and leading U.S. awareness campaigns
centering mother’s stories
advancing the narrative from postpartum depression to maternal mental health
laying the preliminary groundwork in federal and state policy

Our successes have included:
-Forming the National Coalition for Maternal Mental Health in 2014, which was instrumental in passing the Bringing Postpartum Depression out of the Shadows Act in 2016
-Launching the CA Taskforce on Maternal Mental Health, a multi-stakeholder group that studied and created a state strategic plan, which ultimately led to private and public investments in maternal mental health and the passage of the country's most comprehensive state legislative package.
-Creating the Insurer and Hospital "Whole Mom" standards for maternal mental health, which serve as a guidepost for easy and comprehensive action steps
-Hosting an annual FORUM, for cross-sector change agents, with nearly 1,000 attendees annually
-Launching the first-ever maternal mental health online training program with our partner, Postpartum Support International, training
-Founding and incubating "Mom Congress" a membership and advocacy organization that aims to become the "AARP" of motherhood.
-Launching Maternal Mental Health Awareness Month in May 2015, and hosting the annual social media awareness campaign through TheBlueDotProject with over 20 Million impressions on social media
-Creating and hosting the U.S. Maternal Suicide Awareness and Action campaign in 2018, including urging the CDC to begin tracking maternal suicide rates and supporting additional state intervention.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Policy Center for Maternal Mental Health
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Policy Center for Maternal Mental Health

Board of directors
as of 02/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Britt Newton

Britt Newton

Board Chair, Policy Center; Sales CAS

Kobi Ajayi

Secretary, Policy Center; Doctoral Student, School of Public Health Texas A&M University

Jaime Cabrera

Treasurer, Policy Center; Executive Director Colorado Perinatal Quality Collaborative

Sheryl Connelly

Member at Large, Policy Center; Retired Chief Futurist, Ford Motor Company

Jennifer Christian-Herman

Member at Large, Policy Center; Vice President of Mind Body Medicine at Blue Shield of California

Rosanna Durruthy

Member at Large, Policy Center; Head of Global Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging at LinkedIn

Carla Eckhart Taracena

Member at Large, Policy Center; Vice President, Clinical Operations, Visana Health

Benjamin Miller

Member at Large, Policy Center; Past President of Well Being Trust

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/5/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/05/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.