Educational Institutions

Toa Nafasi Project Inc

Providing Chances, Promoting Children

NEW YORK, NY   |  www.toanafasi.org

Mission

Each child is an individual who has diverse aptitudes and different learning styles. Building on this fundamental concept, The Toa Nafasi Project addresses the needs of primary schoolchildren in Tanzania to assess their abilities, cultivate strengths, and resolve weaknesses. We work with teachers, parents, and the community at large to enrich the classroom experience and devise innovative and inspiring teaching methodologies that encourage participation and critical thinking. The goal of The Toa Nafasi Project is to elicit creativity and distinction in academic performance, extracurricular activities, and to provide each child with a chance to excel.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Future—Scaling up - Our long-term vision involves bringing The Toa Nafasi Project to more students, schools, and regions in Tanzania and supporting more women in the community to be trained and employed as tutors. - In 2016, we underwent our first expansion from serving one school to four, and increasing our tutorial staff from three volunteers to 13 full-time and our student numbers from around 60 to 250. - In 2019, we will expand into an additional five schools in the Kilimanjaro region. We will thus be operating in a total of nine schools, serving over 1000 students with learning difficulties, and employing 27 tutors. - We will continue to grow The Toa Nafasi Project into additional schools, wards, districts, and regions in Tanzania in the coming years. The Project's pullout programme for struggling learners is designed to be implementable at any school anywhere in the country.

Ruling year info

2012

Founder and Director

Ms Sarah Rosenbloom

Main address

PO Box 20086

NEW YORK, NY 10014 USA

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EIN

45-5233602

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Toa Nafasi Project is addressing two problems in Tanzania:

- firstly, the lack of support available for children with learning difficulties. The education sector in Tanzania is not equipped to accommodate the individual learning needs of each student and, as a consequence, students with learning difficulties are often unable to fully participate in and benefit from their education, entering into a lifetime of marginalisation and exclusion.

- secondly, the lack of economic empowerment of women. Inequality in Tanzania has grown over the last decade with women being a long way from realising their potential and facing a range of challenges that undermine their ability to make the most of opportunities. Although almost as many Tanzanian women as men participate in the labour force, they are less likely to earn as much as men and more likely to work in the informal sector. Women in stable and secure employment are key to social and economic development in Tanzanian communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Toa Nafasi Project

Working within the government school system in Tanzania, The Toa Nafasi Project program is designed so that it can be introduced into any public primary school in the country. Our three-tiered system provides an innovative approach to deal with the needs of students who are in danger of being marginalized due to their learning difficulties. The Project strives to improve learning outcomes for all students in Standards One and Two but our focus is on the most vulnerable learners in the classroom. We do not deviate from the national syllabi mandated by the Ministry of Education but rather ensure that everyone in the class has an equal opportunity to learn regardless of their learning style. We work with teachers and parents to identify which students are struggling, what the cause might be, and how best to help them. If the problem is medical or psychosocial, we have developed a referral system. If it is scholastic, The Project provides a pull-out programme in which flagging students are removed daily from their regular classes for short one-on-one or small group sessions from our trained staff. Our tutors are young women from the village who have struggled to find gainful employment but who have committed to working with The Project. Through in-service training, they are taught a few simple yet effective teaching methodologies for children with learning difficulties by our international education consultants, and then gain their experience in the classroom. Employment opportunities like these are an additional benefit of The Project for the local community. They empower the young women tutors, and enable them to become productive, contributing members for their families and communities.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children
Females
Budget
$100,910

Where we work

Accreditations

Commendation from USAID 2015

Commendation from the Tanzania Embassy in Washington DC 2013

Commendation from the Director, Moshi Municipal Council, Tanzania 2018

Affiliations & memberships

International Association for Special Education 2012

DICOTA 2017

Angela MacDonald-Stone, University of Massechusetts, Boston 2009

Gabriella Rehabilitation Center, Moshi, Tanzania 2013

TEDx Modena Presentation 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students with learning difficulties supported by The Toa Nafasi Project (disaggregated by sex and challenge faced)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017 The Toa Nafasi Project supported 246 students who were under-performing as compared with their peers

Number of young women working as Toa Nafasi tutors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017, staff included 1 head tutor and project leader, 3 assistant head tutors and 9 tutors employed and trained to assist students with learning difficulties in The Toa Nafasi Project's program

Number of students assessed (disaggregated by sex)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017 The Toa Nafasi Project assessed 438 Standard One schoolchildren across 4 Tanzanian public primary schools

Number of students with learning difficulties referred to health professionals for further assistance (disaggregated by sex and challenge faced)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2017 The Toa Nafasi Project helped 27 students to receive medical or psychosocial care and placed an additional 2 with servere disabilities in a locally-run rehabilitation center

Number of tutors trained and type of training undertaken

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through ongoing in-service training The Toa Nafasi Project provides our tutors with the oppotunity to develop the personal and professional capabilities to support students with learning difficulties

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Toa nafasi means “provide a chance" in Kiswahili. The Project provides a chance to two distinct but interrelated populations - students in their early education years who are experiencing difficulty learning, and a previously unemployed, untapped workforce of local women as tutors for the program. Vision We envision a world in which every Tanzanian student is provided the chance to receive quality primary education that recognises and fosters individual talent and celebrates uniqueness. Goals The goals for The Toa Nafasi Project are: - To ensure that students with learning difficulties are given the assistance they need to reach their full potential. - To support and empower the young local women we employ and train as tutors. - To support and work with communities, parents and families, teachers and administrators in the government school system. - To partner and collaborate with the Tanzanian Government.

Children with Learning Difficulties The Toa Nafasi Project's supports students found to be flagging in the early grades of primary school. Assessment—We observe each student for social behaviors, adaptive abilities, and motor skills as well as test their literacy, numeracy, and cognitive skills. Referral—Our referral system of health professionals treat those pupils who are struggling due to medical or psychosocial issues. Curriculum modification—We work with remaining students who are still struggling to complete the standard Tanzanian curriculum by using a modified context. Toa Nafasi Tutors Female tutors are selected for the modified curriculum from the local community. Through training, they develop personal and professional capabilities, expand their horizons, develop leadership skills, and build self-esteem and confidence. We provide on-going in-service training and seek their contribution to The Project's decision making and program implementation processes.

The Toa Nafasi Project comprises unique methods for teaching and learning by: 1 Locating our work within the public sector. 2 Assigning a high value to transcultural understanding. 3 Working with communities to introduce the Toa Nafasi way. 4 Intervention strategies designed to identify and support learning challenged students. 5 Placing significant importance on providing opportunities to local women. 6 A network of international scholars, special education consultants, and early childhood educators. We identify and support individual students through the: -Development of assessment strategies. -Development of an alternative classroom model. -Introduction of Individual Education Plans. -Employment and training of young local women. -Collaboration with an array of specialised medical, psychosocial, special education experts, and organizations. -Convening an international team of professional experts. -Active engagement with Tanzanian Government authorities.

The Toa Nafasi Project uses several tools and indicators for monitoring our activities and outcomes. We assess students after six months and one year, and use reports from parents, teachers, and school officials. We hold individual interviews with headmasters and teachers, and conduct surveys and focus groups with the families and village members. We augment our practices with a standard methodology for internal measurements and for demonstrating a track record. The Project uses the following indicators: 1. Number of students with learning difficulties supported by The Project (sex disaggregated and challenge) 2. Number of young women working as tutors 3. Number of students assessed (sex disaggregated) 4. Number of children referred to health professionals for additional assistance (sex disaggregated and challenge) 5. Number of tutors trained and type of training

Our Impact - We began in 2013 with 19 students, and a Tanzanian volunteer and the Founder as tutors. In 2014, our numbers grew to 60 students with another tutor and in 2015 four more tutors were employed. In 2016 we expanded to three more schools with around 250 students and 13 tutors. - Since 2013, we have enabled over 95% of Standard One and Two students to qualify to move onto the next grade. - Since 2013, approximately 80 students have had medical or psychosocial treatment. - Since 2012, we have partnered with The Gabriella Rehabilitation Centre in Moshi which is home to seven of our children, who require a self-contained environment. Next Step In 2019 we will expand from 4 to 9 public primary schools, supporting over 1000 grade 1 and 2 students, and 27 women as tutors for our program. We will also assist at least 24 students in specialist education facilities, where appropriate, and provide over 60 students with medical treatment and therapy, and/or psychological assistance.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person).

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is difficult to get honest feedback from our clients.

Financials

Toa Nafasi Project Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Toa Nafasi Project Inc

Board of directors
as of 12/4/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms Sarah Rosenbloom

The Toa Nafasi Project

Term: 2012 -

Sarah Rosenbloom

The Toa Nafasi Project

Carla Peterson

University of Maryland

Veronica Rovegno

Clark Armitage

Caplin and Drysdale

Lucy Lee

Greenberg Traurig

Romana Li

Retired

Genesis Kiwelu

Moshi Municipality

Harrison Ngowi

Self-employed

Robin Peterson

Clinical Psychologist (Self-employed)

Methley Swai

Just-Kilimanjaro

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Keywords

Inclusive education, education, children with learning difficulties, economic empowerment of women