CENTER FOR DISASTER PHILANTHROPY INC

Washington, DC   |  www.disasterphilanthropy.org

Mission

To leverage the power of philanthropy to mobilize a full range of resources that strengthen the ability of communities to withstand disasters and recover equitably when they occur.

Ruling year info

2012

President and CEO

Patricia McIlreavy

Main address

One Thomas Circle, NW Suite 700

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-5257937

NTEE code info

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) is the only full-time resource dedicated to helping donors make more strategic disaster-related giving decisions. With the increasing frequency and intensity of disasters comes the critical need for knowing when and how to respond effectively. CDP’s innovative strategies advance donors’ values, increase the impact of their contributions, meet the needs of vulnerable populations and ultimately strengthen communities. CDP is working to transform disaster giving by providing timely and thoughtful strategies to increase donors’ impact during domestic and global disasters.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CDP Disaster Recovery Fund

In the wake of a disaster, emotions run high. Dramatic images circulate alongside startling statistics of lives lost and billions of dollars in damages.

We’re moved to do something—anything—to help. Immediate needs must be met. Lives must be saved and vital functions restored. But if disaster funding begins and ends there, the opportunity for strategic long-term recovery and true rebuilding of the community has passed.

Imagine, instead, the tactical allocation of funds across the entire disaster life cycle, from disaster preparedness through long-term recovery. With thoughtful analysis ahead of the disaster, each dollar given in response can be used to its full potential. That not only means less waste and duplication of efforts; it also means combined dollars can reach further toward solutions.

Population(s) Served
Victims of disaster
Economically disadvantaged people

Private philanthropy has a unique and critical role to play in the relentless spread of global humanitarian crises by providing urgently needed help and support to people globally, whether they are affected by disease, drought, civil war or natural disasters. These crises have become a defining epidemic of this decade. Your vital support will assist organizations on the ground in countries focused on recovery efforts.

The CDP Global Recovery Fund is exclusively for international disasters and allows donors to earmark contributions to meet specific philanthropic goals for any global crisis to support medium- to long-term recovery work. Or, there is the option to allow CDP to allocate your investment where it is needed the most.

The Global Recovery Fund provides an efficient, flexible solution to expedite a gift to support recovery efforts for sudden on-set disasters or protracted humanitarian emergencies.

Population(s) Served
Victims of disaster
Economically disadvantaged people

In March 2020, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) launched the CDP COVID-19 Response Fund to support containment, response and recovery activities for those most affected and for the responders.

The Fund is focusing on support for nonprofit organizations working directly to respond to the pandemic among vulnerable populations in order to help build their capacity to address the most pressing needs. These include social service organizations focused on supporting low-income households, small businesses, immigrants, refugees, Native Americans and Alaska Natives, older adults, people with disabilities, and other communities vulnerable to the physical health, mental health and economic impacts of the pandemic.

CDP is working closely with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to track both current and emergent needs. Focus areas include:

* Supporting healthcare and other frontline workers through provision and distribution of masks, gowns, gloves and other personal protective equipment (PPE) for essential staff, as well as the deployment of emergency medical teams where needed.
* Supporting quarantined and especially vulnerable individuals by lessening financial hardships for people who are quarantined and those for whom social distancing is not an option. Support also includes building the capacity of local food banks to respond to the mounting number of people who are food insecure.
* Supporting small businesses through emergency grants and mentoring programs to help owners sustain their businesses and to support the economy of vulnerable communities.
* Supporting hygiene promotion activities (WASH) and community-based care in areas with poor access to medical care to help limit the spread of COVID-19 and other infections.

CDP is responding rapidly and effectively, using contributions to the Fund to address these core issues, while constantly assessing needs. This allows CDP to be adaptive in our support.

Population(s) Served

Since 2017, California has experienced historic record-breaking wildfires and fire seasons, and each new year is poised to continue this tragic trend.

In 2017, the Tubbs Fire destroyed more than 5,600 structures and claimed 22 lives in Napa & Sonoma counties. In 2018, we witnessed the most destructive wildfire in the state’s history when the Camp Fire took 85 lives and destroyed more than 18,800 structures. And in 2019, more than 6,800 fire incidents in California burned hundreds of thousands of acres across the state, including the Kincade Fire that forced over 185,000 to flee from their homes in Sonoma County.

The Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) California Wildfires Recovery Fund supports communities across the state as they work to rebuild and recover from wildfires. Since its inception, CDP has awarded more than $3 million in grants to nonprofits and community groups in northern and southern California to help families and entire communities recover through targeted grantmaking that prioritizes medium- to long-term recovery especially among vulnerable populations.

CDP recognizes that the disaster cycle does not end after a fire and full recovery. The Fund also focuses on wildfire mitigation and risk reduction to invest in building stronger communities to keep up with the increasing trend and threat of wildfires in the state.

As the number and severity of the fires continue to increase, grantmakers and donors must intensify and expand their support to the state both before and after wildfires to better position communities to prepare, respond and recover.

To effectively address this growing threat in California, CDP experts on staff work directly with local nonprofits, stakeholders and community groups to identify specific needs and gaps related to California’s most impactful wildfires. CDP consults with many of its in-state partners, such as the Governor’s Office of Emergency Service (Cal OES) and other agencies, to assess the long-term needs of affected communities and build collaborative partnerships.

With an emphasis on recovery, this Fund:
* Targets and support vulnerable populations and communities disproportionally affected.
* Identifies and fill in gaps where public resources are unavailable or scarce.
* Gives locally and prioritize grants to small nonprofits and community groups.
* Builds and supports collaborative relationships among donors.

The programmatic expertise of CDP’s board, advisory council and staff – paired with an extensive network of disaster management experts – guide our grantmaking strategy. We emphasize making targeted, holistic investments with grants that will address the greatest emergent needs and gaps in the funding of mitigation and recovery efforts.

Population(s) Served

The CDP Atlantic Hurricane Season Recovery Fund has a focus on medium- and long-term recovery from these storms. This includes rebuilding homes and livelihoods, meeting the needs of more vulnerable populations, supporting mental health services and addressing other urgent challenges identified by the affected communities that arise as recovery efforts progress.

Our expert staff, in consultation with local stakeholders and recovery experts, identifies specific unmet recovery needs and funding gaps in each community. The Fund will explore investing in all geographic areas affected by this season’s Atlantic hurricanes.

Through CDP’s unparalleled expertise in disaster management and grantmaking, the Fund will be invested in projects and initiatives that:
* Support vulnerable populations whose lives and livelihoods have been devastated.
* Emphasize funding that is medium- and long-term in nature, based upon prevailing needs that have emerged post-disaster.
* Fill in gaps where public resources are unavailable or scarce.
* Foster collaborative relationships among grantees and other organizations.

Population(s) Served

On Aug. 14, 2021, an M7.2 earthquake struck the southwest of Haiti in the mountains between the Nippes Department and Sud Department. This earthquake occurred at a depth of only 6.2 miles (10 km), which is critical because shallow earthquakes usually cause more damage.

CDP’s Haiti Earthquake Recovery Fund supports communities across Haiti as they work to rebuild and recover from the earthquake. The fund supports families and entire communities through targeted grantmaking that prioritizes needs identified in collaboration with local partners. With an equity lens and an emphasis on medium- and long-term recovery, CDP works to identify gaps in recovery funding to help direct financial and technical support where it is needed most.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of disaster

On Dec. 30, 2021, high winds and downed electrical lines in Boulder County sparked two wildfires that led to multiple evacuations and hundreds of homes destroyed. The Marshall Fire, the larger of the two fires, is believed to be the most destructive fire in Colorado history.

In 2020, Colorado joined last year’s record-breaking North American wildfire season with three fires challenging firefighters in the state: the Cameron Peak Fire, East Troublesome Fire and Calwood Fire. The Cameron Peak and East Troublesome fires are the first- and second-largest fires in Colorado history, respectively.

The Center for Disaster Philanthropy’s (CDP) Colorado Wildfires Recovery Fund supports communities across the state as they work to rebuild and recover from the fires. The fund supports families and entire communities through targeted grantmaking that prioritizes medium- and long-term recovery needs identified in collaboration with local partners.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims of disaster

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of disaster, Emergency responders, Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of disaster, Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average grant amount

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Victims of disaster, Economically disadvantaged people, Emergency responders, Indigenous peoples

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Vision: A world where the impact of disasters is minimized by thoughtful, equitable and responsible recovery for all.

Build Awareness: Support, not only for immediate relief, but for medium- to long-term recovery. This goal is to help donors be more informed and more strategic in giving to disasters. Recovery doesn't take months, it takes years.

Impart Knowledge: CDP provides educational resources and shares its expertise to make disaster giving more effective, efficient and strategic.

Facilitate Access: Donors can readily access resilience, preparation and recovery providers through CDP.

Enhance Policymaking: CDP supports advocacy for public funding streams to encompass more investment in disaster resilience, preparation and recovery.

Share expertise: CDP works to be at the forefront of disaster recovery practice.
Be donor-centric: Ensure funders and donors are educated in their disaster giving
Do efficient grantmaking: CDP is an efficient and effective channel for funds for organizations working on recovery post-disaster.
Commit to holistic recoveries: A equity lens is applied to all aspects of CDP disaster recovery efforts.

Since its founding, CDP has had a sole focus on disasters which means it is uniquely qualified to direct philanthropic responses to sudden, weather-related events, unprecedented occurrences such as the pandemic and protracted complex humanitarian emergencies.

Its team has extensive experience in disaster relief and recovery, nonprofit management and effective grantmaking. CDP has a remote working structure that gives the organization presence in key areas, prone to natural disasters including Florida, Texas and the Midwest.

The Strategic Plan was adopted by the Board of Directors in November 2019, however CDP has:

Increased its public profile and shared its expertise with a significant number of philanthropic organizations, media outlets and corporate partners in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vetted lists of nonprofit partners responding to the pandemic were shared broadly to increase access to providers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our mission is to "Leverage the power of philanthropy to mobilize a full range of resources that strengthen the ability of communities to withstand disasters and recover equitably when they occur." To that end, we serve two audiences. First, philanthropy, in an effort to encourage more effective disaster giving. Second, we serve our grantee partners by providing them with financial and technical resources to undertake recovery work post-disaster.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), regular interactions with all of our constituents,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are in the midst of a CEP survey of our 256 grantees currently.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We will share the feedback once the survey is complete,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We cannot wait to use the feedback we receive! Our hope is that it will inform our future work and encourage us to be better grantmakers and better stewards of the funding we raise.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    we are doing the CEP survey, and we actively engage with our grantee partners to solicit feedback,

Financials

CENTER FOR DISASTER PHILANTHROPY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CENTER FOR DISASTER PHILANTHROPY INC

Board of directors
as of 08/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kenneth Jones II

The MacArthur Foundation

Kenneth Jones II

The MacArthur Foundation

Sam Worthington

InterAction

Anita Whitehead

KPMG

Sabrena Silver

White & Case LLP

Christine Riley-Miller

Samsonite

Tiffany Benjamin

Humana Foundation

Travis Campbell

AMD

Heather Geronemus

UKG

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/16/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/26/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.