HEADSTRONG PROJECT INC

Healing the Hidden Wounds of War

aka HEAD STRONG PROJECT   |   New York, NY   |  www.getheadstrong.org

Mission

THE HEADSTRONG PROJECT'S MISSION IS TO PROVIDE COMPREHENSIVE, EFFECTIVE, AND COST-FREE MENTAL HEALTH CARE TO MILITARY VETERANS DEALING WITH MILITARY RELATED TRAUMAS.

Ruling year info

2012

Founder & Chairman of the Board

Zachary Iscol

Vice Chairman of the Board

Dave Petrucco

Main address

641 Lexington Avenue, 25th Floor

New York, NY 10022 USA

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Formerly known as

HEADSTRONG PROJECT

EIN

45-5261907

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Past generations of veterans coming home from combat have not received the correct forms of mental health care. Headstrong Project has the vision to provide the correct treatment and is expanding to markets across the country to ensure that this generation can meet their potential in life. The key is continuing our growth of the brand to other markets with partners that understand the magnitude of having our youngest generation of veterans become mentally healthy.
The program’s goal is to engage veterans and provide treatment to help them reduce the crippling symptoms associated with combat PTSD, including suicidal ideation. Veterans who receive tailored and consistent mental health treatment then experience measurable improvement in their emotional well-being, they enjoy longer and better sleep, better home and work relationships, and they experience a reduction in harmful behaviors including excessive substance use. They are able to go to school, get jobs, and maintain sobriety from alcohol and drugs when indicated.
III. Clinical practices
Headstrong Project and Weill Cornell Medicine bring together clinicians who are specifically trained in trauma and PTSD. These include psychiatrists, addiction psychiatrists, psychologists, and licensed clinical social workers.

Veterans in need of help are identified through direct veteran to veteran outreach, veteran service organizations, Department of Veterans Affairs, self-referral through ads in social media, and Headstrong Project’s website (www.getHeadstrong.org). Once referred, veterans are screened, assessed and then the veteran and clinician together craft a course of treatment that is tailored to the individual veteran’s wants and needs following the three tenets of trauma therapy; stabilization, memory processing, and reintegration.
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and EEG Neurofeedback are the primary methods in the stabilization process. The goal is to ensure that the veteran’s anxiety is brought to a level where memory processing can begin. Headstrong Project utilizes the evidence-based practice of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR) for memory processing and is the cornerstone therapy of the program. EMDR therapy was implemented as the cornerstone therapy because it allows the veteran and the clinician to work as a team through each traumatic event. It is not a regimented or an aggressive form of therapy, but a method that works into the tailored model of the program. Results from EMDR work very quickly and it is a therapy that is used around the world for a variety of trauma victims; rape, abuse, natural disasters, etc. When the traumatic memories from the veteran have been processed, then the reintegration process will begin. Reintegration is when the clinicians become "life coaches” for the veteran. Veterans begin to become a part of a community again, redevelop work skills, and develop their next passion in life.
The final piece of the clinical practices and mindset is that Headstrong Project’s entire program takes mind-body therapy approach. We understand that there are certain activities that will put the mind at ease, keep the brain focused at a correct level, and physical activity is part of healing body and mind. These activities include, but are not limited to yoga, canoeing, and rock climbing. We have seen tremendous strides in our veterans in the areas of stabilization and reintegration when they participate in such activities. In summary, Headstrong Project’s clinical practice is a tailored approach using the three tenets of trauma therapy with a mind-body therapy mentality.
The methods of our program have shown extremely positive data outcomes. Clinical outcomes for our clients are as follows: after treatment 86% reported better sleep, 89% had fewer flashbacks and nightmares, 86% were less hyper vigilant, 76% reported improved relationships, 92% had reduced suicidal ideation, 91% had improved mood, 95% had improvements in job and/or education, 89% used less drugs or alcohol, and 78% required less or no medication for their symptoms.
IV. Family support
We understand at Headstrong Project that not only does the veteran suffer from PTSD, but this can also affect the family. We recognized to make our program as effective as possible for the veteran, that educating spouses on the issues that come with PTSD would be of enormous value.
The same confidential cost free, stigma free, and bureaucracy free approach carries into the group therapy that we provide to spouses. The purpose of this group is to educate the spouses on what their veteran is going through, to give them a community that is going through similar issues at home, and allow them to gain advice on how to handle certain situations that have occurred from the PTSD.
We have seen tremendous increases amongst the couples involving their trust, communication, and commitment to one another.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Adults

II. GOALS OF HEADSTRONG PROJECT

Headstrong Project has the vision to provide the correct treatment and is expanding to markets across the country to ensure that this generation can meet their potential in life. The key is continuing our growth of the brand to other markets with partners that understand the magnitude of having our youngest generation of veterans become mentally healthy.

The program’s goal is to engage veterans and provide treatment to help them reduce the crippling symptoms associated with combat PTSD, including suicidal ideation. Veterans who receive tailored and consistent mental health treatment then experience measurable improvement in their emotional well-being, they enjoy longer and better sleep, better home and work relationships, and they experience a reduction in harmful behaviors including excessive substance use. They are able to go to school, get jobs, and maintain sobriety from alcohol and drugs when indicated.

III. CLINICAL PRACTICES

Headstrong Project and Weill Cornell Medicine bring together clinicians who are specifically trained in trauma and PTSD. These include psychiatrists, addiction psychiatrists, psychologists, and licensed clinical social workers. Veterans in need of help are identified through direct veteran to veteran outreach, veteran service organizations, Department of Veterans Affairs, self-referral through ads in social media, and Headstrong Project’s website (www.getheadstrong.org). Once referred, veterans are screened, assessed and then the veteran and clinician together craft a course of treatment that is tailored to the individual veteran’s wants and needs following the three tenets of trauma therapy; stabilization, memory processing, and reintegration.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and EEG Neurofeedback are the primary methods in the stabilization process. The goal is to ensure that the veteran’s anxiety is brought to a level where memory processing can begin. Headstrong Project utilizes the evidence-based practice of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR) for memory processing and is the cornerstone therapy of the program. EMDR therapy was implemented as the cornerstone therapy because it allows the veteran and the clinician to work as a team through each traumatic event. It is not a regimented or an aggressive form of therapy, but a method that works into the tailored model of the program. Results from EMDR work very quickly and it is a therapy that is used around the world for a variety of trauma victims; rape, abuse, natural disasters, etc. When the traumatic memories from the veteran have been processed, then the reintegration process will begin. Reintegration is when the clinicians become "life coaches” for the veteran. Veterans begin to become a part of a community again, redevelop work skills, and develop their next passion in life.

The final piece of the clinical practices and mindset is that Headstrong Project’s entire program takes mind-body therapy approach. We understand that there are certain activities that will put the mind at ease, keep the brain focused at a correct level, and physical activity is part of healing body and mind. These activities include, but are not limited to yoga, canoeing, and rock climbing. We have seen tremendous strides in our veterans in the areas of stabilization and reintegration when they participate in such activities. In summary, Headstrong Project’s clinical practice is a tailored approach using the three tenets of trauma therapy with a mind-body therapy mentality.

The methods of our program have shown extremely positive data outcomes. Clinical outcomes for our clients are as follows: after treatment 80% reported better sleep, 70% had fewer flashbacks and nightmares, 74% were less hyper vigilant, 65% reported improved relationships, 83% had reduced suicidal ideation, 82% had improved mood, 70% had improvements in job and/or education, 78% used less alcohol, 59% used less drugs, and 60% required less or no medication for their symptoms.

IV. Location of the Headstrong Treatment Programs:
- California: San Diego, Temecula, Murrieta, Los Angeles
- Colorado: Boulder, Colorado Springs, Denver
- Illinois: Chicago
- Maryland: Bethesda, Chevy Chase
- New Jersey: Montclair
- New York: Albany, Buffalo, Ithaca, New York City, Rochester, Syracuse
- Pennsylvania: Philadelphia
- Texas: Houston
- Virginia: Alexandria, Springfield
- Washington D.C.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total Number of Active Clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Veterans

Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are now in 12 states and 28 cities across the Unites States and are actively treating over 750 clients monthly. To date, our clinicians have provided over 65,000 clinical session to date.

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Veterans

Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of hours have been calculated using the total number of sessions provided within that year.

Percent of clients reporting better sleep

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of clienst who had fewer flashbacks and nightmares.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project. 68

Percent of clients who were less hypervigilant

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of clients who reported improved relationships.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of clients who had reduced suicidal ideation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of clients who had improvements in their mood

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of Clients who used less alcohol.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of clients who required less or no medication for their symptoms.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Percent of Clients who had improvements in job and/or education.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HEADSTRONG PROJECT TREATMENT PROGRAM

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data was collected from clients who has received at least 5 months of treatment through the Headstrong Project.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Correcting larger veteran issues
Local and Federal governments have been trying to reduce major veteran issues for many years such as unemployment, domestic violence, substance abuse, and homelessness. Mental health is a pre-requisite for all of these large societal issues. By helping veterans feel better, and regain their emotional well-being and self- esteem, they are in a much better position to pursue their career goals.
Headstrong Project has the correct people on board, clinical product, and processes to see the successes continue across the country. For more information, please go to www.getHeadstrong.org.

Operations
Mental health is a highly stigmatized arena in this country. This stigmatized feeling is exponentially higher in the veteran community because in a combat zone, service members must “tough it out" and this is what they were trained to do. Many veterans have learned that one doesn't discuss symptoms of PTSD, that physical injuries you can see are more “real". They fear being labeled crazy, or that having a diagnosis of PTSD will impact on employment opportunities. Warrior culture can prevent veterans from wanting to talk about their experiences; many fear overwhelming and upsetting themselves and others. Often veterans find it difficult to mourn fallen brothers and sisters, and they may expend much of their energy keeping thoughts and feeling at the perimeter of their consciousness. Many veterans self-medicate with alcohol and other drugs, resulting in such consequences as loss of employment, loss of relationships and sometimes their life.
Headstrong Project recognizes that there are evidence-based, effective mental health treatments and protocols that can immediately impact returning combat veterans for the better. The first challenge is reaching those veterans, engaging them, and retaining them in care. Our first goal is to enhance the mental health of wounded service members, and to help them foster healthy readjustment to civilian life. By reducing PTSD and emotional symptoms and increasing mental wellness, we are helping veterans regain part of themselves that they feared they'd left on the battlefield.
When a veteran calls our program, or submits their contact information on the website, we respond personally within 48 hours. This means calling the veteran, and/or emailing them, and engaging them in a conversation that serves to explain that we understand what they are going through, and that we can help.
The intake call is the first point of human contact. It is followed by an in person psychiatric assessment, and the development of a tailored treatment plan. The tailored treatment plan will first evaluate whether this veteran is “high" or “low" functioning. High functioning veterans are typically those that have a job or going to school, have meaningful relationships, and are not using drugs and/or alcohol to an abusive point. Low functioning veterans are those that are using drugs and/or alcohol at dangerous levels and are unable to accomplish tasks that would deem them productive citizens.
We understand that substance abuse is an issue amongst veterans with PTSD because it's a quick way for veterans to reduce their symptoms. Dr. Ann Beeder is an expert in substance abuse and she has been able to bring on the most highly qualified substance abuse counselors on staff to treat the veterans. Veterans that are not suffering from substance abuse will work with their clinician to reduce their symptoms from all the modalities mentioned previously.
We do not put a cap on the number of sessions or services we provide.

In partnership with Weill Cornell Medical College, the nation's leading mental health care centers, Headstrong developed a 1st of its kind, individually tailored comprehensive treatment program for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD); Addiction Treatment; Anxiety & Depression; Trauma, Grief and Loss; and Anger Management.
A team of world class clinicians, and local expert mental health care providers, have develop a fully integrated treatment model that includes case planning, management, supervision, oversight, and funding. All funds raised through annual benefit galas, Foundations, corporate sponsors, and individual contributions, helps provide competitive rates for our top clinicians nationwide. We are now is 8 states and 20 cities across the U.S.

Headstrong Project's mission is to provide cost free, stigma free, and bureaucracy free mental healthcare to post 9-11 combat veterans.
The numbers are staggering. Over 300,000 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans report symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The VA estimates we lose 22 veterans a day to suicide and the Department of Defense reports 30-50 active duty troops take their lives every month. For every service member we have lost in combat, 25-30 take their own lives. These numbers also do not reflect increases in dangerous and destructive behaviors among veterans - such as domestic abuse and substance abuse.
Headstrong is currently treating veterans in New York, New Jersey, Washington DC, Houston Texas, Chicago IL, Southern CA and soon to be expanding to Denver and Colorado Springs. The goal is to be able to provide the very best mental health care to all combat veterans across the US.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

HEADSTRONG PROJECT INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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HEADSTRONG PROJECT INC

Board of directors
as of 4/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Zach Iscol

Headstrong Project

Term: 2012 -


Board co-chair

Dave Petrucco

Headstrong Project

Albert Rabil

Kayne Anderson Real Estate Advisors

Paul Casey

Morgan Stanley

Peter Westmeyer

MBRES healthcare

Colonel Peter Petronzio

Darlan Monterisi

CA Technologies

Dave Petrucco

Backcast Partners

Dr. Ann Beeder

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Ryan Sparks

Chris Koch

Carlisle Companies

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data