CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

Never Forget Your Dreams®

aka Crazy Horse; Crazy Horse Memorial   |   Crazy Horse, SD   |  www.crazyhorsememorial.org

Mission

The mission of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation is to protect and preserve the culture, traditions, and living heritage of the North American Indians. The Foundation demonstrates its commitment to this endeavor by continuing the progress on the world's largest sculpture by carving a memorial of Lakota leader Crazy Horse; by providing educational and cultural programming and serving as a repository for Native American artifacts, arts and crafts through THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® and THE NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER®; and by establishing and operating THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® and, when practical, a medical training center for American Indians. Charitable gifts received are devoted to further these purposes. https://crazyhorsememorial.org/dream

Notes from the nonprofit

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation is sustained solely through admissions and charitable gifts from individuals and private corporations and foundations. Gifts may be made online at: https://donate.crazyhorsememorial.org/

Ruling year info

1949

CEO

Monique Ziolkowski

President/COO

Dr. Laurie J. Becvar

Main address

12151 Avenue of the Chiefs

Crazy Horse, SD 57730 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-0220678

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Crazy Horse Memorial honors North America's indigenous peoples and THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA attempts to teach visitors and supporters about Native American culture and traditions in a world that often misunderstands or is uninformed about the gifts Native Americans offer society. A focus of the Museum is sharing the true Native story in American history and fostering understanding and healing between Natives and non-Natives and for all humanity. Moreover, through the story of sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski and his family, the Memorial teaches the values and principles of making a promise and keeping it, setting a goal and never giving up, persevering in the midst of adversity, and devoting one's life to something much larger than oneself. The Memorial reminds the world of the importance of these values through its work on the Mountain Carving of Crazy Horse, THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®, and THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA®.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

CRAZY HORSE MOUNTAIN CARVING

The highly complex steps in the mountain carving process at Crazy Horse can be summarized in relatively simple terms. We are making a very large duplicate of Korczak’s model sculpture to tell the story of North American Indian cultures. That artwork depicts the Lakota warrior Crazy Horse riding his horse out of the granite and gesturing forward and proclaiming, "My lands are where my dead lie buried.” In order to convey that powerful story on a monumental scale, we follow three basic steps: 1) measure Korczak’s model; 2) measure the Mountain; 3) remove all the rock that doesn’t fit! In reality, each of these steps becomes quite complex and requires the use of powerful tools, technologies, and manual labor, but the guiding principles remain simple.

The members of the Crazy Horse mountain crew are experts in precision blasting, equipment operation, and engineering. They maintain a strong emphasis on safety in all steps of the operation and are proud to have an outstanding safety record.

In addition to the program costs included in the 990, we have invested over $49 million in the mountain carving and Native American artifacts for display.

Expenses totaling $3,957,931 directly support the Foundation's Programs. This total does not include the annual cash outlay directed toward enhancing the Crazy Horse Mountain Carving, which totaled $2,922,712 during FY 2020. Without the funds directed to this endeavor, our mission would not be achieved. If this amount were allowed to be reported as program expenses under IRS guidelines and generally accepted accounting principles, the Foundation's total program expenses would be reflected as $6,880,643 or 75% of the total. We do not rely on any government funding to support our mission. All funds are raised through the fundraising efforts of our employees, board members, and through visitor admissions. We take our fiduciary responsibilities seriously and strive to spend each dollar wisely. Members of Korczak Ziolkowski's family and the Foundation's management and staff continue to work tirelessly in all aspects of the Foundation operations to ensure our dream is fulfilled and the dollars are spent prudently.

Our founders are Chief Henry Standing Bear, who invited Korczak Ziolkowski to carve a monument honoring Native Americans of North America. Korczak Ziolkowski, the carver; and Ruth Ziolkowski, the carver's wife are also among the Memorials' founders.

The Mountain carving of Crazy Horse continues on a daily basis as weather, availability of financing, and engineering challenges allow. The completed Mountain is expected to be 641 feet long by 563 feet high. Crazy Horse's completed Head is 87 feet 6 inches high. The current focus of work on the Mountain includes Crazy Horse’s outstretched left Arm, Hand, and Finger, as well as Crazy Horse’s right Shoulder and Hairline, and portions of the Horse’s Mane and Head, all of which are projected to be finished in 5-10 years. The mountain crew uses precision explosive engineering to carefully and safely remove and shape the rock of the mountain.

For photos and more information about the process of carving the world’s largest sculpture, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/the-mountain.html

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® is home to an extraordinary collection of art and artifacts reflecting the diverse histories and cultures of the American Indian people. The Museum, designed to complement the story being told in stone on the Mountain, speaks eloquently to present and future generations about American Indian life.

The Museum collection started out with single display donated in 1965 by Charles Eder, Hunkpapa Lakota, from Montana. Mr. Eder’s impressive collection remains on display in a place of honor in the Museum at Crazy Horse Memorial.

Close to 90 percent of the museum collection has been donated, both by Native Americans and by non-Natives. Many individuals and families have decided that THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® is where their American Indian artifacts and art should find a permanent home.

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® serves as an excellent resource for both Native Americans and non-Natives. Visitors have an opportunity to study and learn from the displays and the many other cultural and educational resources at Crazy Horse. It gave Korczak, Ruth, and their family great satisfaction to see visitors in the museum appreciating and learning from the beautiful artifacts.

With over 11,000 pieces, the total collection is currently valued at over $7.7 million. Efforts to rearrange the collections with an emphasis on narrative- and geographic-driven interpretation are underway. Future plans to expand the Museum include a new 40,000 square foot two-level performance and museum space.

To see photos and learn more about exhibits in the INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/the-museums.html

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Adults

THE NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER®, one part of THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®, provides a number of unique educational opportunities, including the Living Treasures and Artist in Residence programs, which showcase the talents of established and emerging Native artists, enhancing the visitor experience. The space displays one-of-a-kind artifact collections, houses temporary exhibitions, and features special activities and games. The center hosts and encourages many hands-on activities (e.g., playing Native American games and making Native American crafts). Activities always include explanations of cultural significance and usage in order to teach the proper cultural respect.

For photos & examples of our educational programs, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/story/the-museums/the-native-american-educational-cultural-center/

For information about cultural programming, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/story/the-museums/cultural-programs-opportunities/

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples
Adults

THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® commenced in 2010 as a summer program, housing and educating students in its blended instructional and residential facility over the summer months as they complete their first semester of college. Students take classes full-time to earn college credit as part of a summer semester in partnership with the University of South Dakota, including a credit-bearing, paid internship working at the Memorial in both front-line service and behind-the-scenes support roles. The distinctive program provides an unconventional level of student support.

Each summer, up to 32 students representing numerous tribes and states are accepted into The Indian University of North America® summer program, a unique partnership between the Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation and the University of South Dakota. These students enroll in courses including English, computer science, psychology, and speech, college-success strategies, and they complete a paid internship. They spend the summer learning habits of success for college and for life. To date, the program has served nearly 300 Native American students from 40 different Native communities and 20 states. Subsequently, successful completers of the summer program have earned college degrees at the associate, bachelor, and Master's levels from colleges, universities, and tribal colleges throughout the United States. Student Success Coaching follows the students wherever they pursue their degrees and annual formal research is conducted to answer the question: how many previous participants remain in college or earned college degrees? Research typically yields a response rate of over 80% and reveals that 75-87% of past participants remain in college or earned college degrees. College graduates are currently working as teachers, nurses, a dental hygienist, museum professionals, counselors, and business professionals in all walks of life.

Building upon the successful yet unconventional model of the summer program, plans are currently underway to expand THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® with year-round programming, further increasing the number of Native students who hold college degrees. Together with area Native American thought leaders and South Dakota State University, we developed a sustainability and leadership program for Native American students, blending preservation and advancement of Native land stewardship with western science. The program utilizes tribally-derived knowledge, blending the environmental, social, economic, and spiritual dimensions of sustainability. It's titled, The Wizipan Sustainability and Leadership Certificate Program. Wachante Hecha Wizipan in Lakota implies "the Heart of Everything that Is".

For the Wizipan Program, students study for a semester, study-abroad style, leaving their degree-granting institutions to visit our university. They earn certificates/minors in Sustainability and Leadership with credits fully transferable to the students’ degree-granting institutions.

Fifteen credit-hours of coursework explores global and indigenous food systems, Native American history from an environmental perspective, skills for community leadership, and the interactions of people with the environment. Students also work directly with sustainability issues through case studies. The courses equip participants with lessons on leadership for roles in their future communities and workplaces so that more Native Americans are seen in leadership positions in a variety of areas. These leaders will be able to go on to effectively tackle environmental issues such as tree diseases/pest infestations, water quality, the ecological balance of grasslands, fish and wildlife population/health, and other problems that may arise, perhaps even tribal sustainability itself. The program serves up to 30 students annually.

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation also supports many Native American students through its Scholarship Program. During FY 2020, the Foundation provided $130,000 to various universities and other organizations that directly support the educational needs of Native Americans. Since 1978, the Foundation has awarded over $2.6 million in scholarships to American Indian students striving to further their educational goals.

For more information, please visit:
https://crazyhorsememorial.org/indian-university-of-north-america.html

Population(s) Served
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Accreditations

USA Today's 10 Spectacular Laser and Light Shows Around the World 2018

Awards

Certificate of Excellence 2017

TripAdvisor

President's Circle for the Black Hills Chapter 2017

United Way

President's Circle for the Black Hills Chapter 2016

United Way

Kid Builder Club 2016

YMCA

Kid Builder Club 2014

YMCA

Kid Builder Club 2011

YMCA

Kid Builder Club 2008

YMCA

George S. Mickelson Great Service Award 2017

South Dakota Governor's Office

10 Spectacular Laser and Light Shows Around the World 2018

USA Today

Presiden't Circle for the Black Hills Chapter 2019

United Way

Governor's Great Service Award 2018

South Dakota Governor's Office

Governor's Great Service Award 2019

South Dakota Governor's Office

Exceptional Scholar Partner 2019

Western Dakota Tech Foundation

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Volksmarch participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

CRAZY HORSE MOUNTAIN CARVING

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Volksmarchers hike 5K to Crazy Horse's arm twice a year. Due to the covid pandemic, the June 2020 Volksmarch was cancelled. Complimentary van rides are available for the physically disabled.

Total number of awarded residencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Academics, Artists and performers

Related Program

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Native American artists, writers and musicians are provided a month-long residency to create and sell artworks and interact with visitors. Artists receive 100% of their sales in addition to a stipend.

Total number of performances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Academics, Artists and performers

Related Program

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Native dancers, musicians, storytellers, and more perform at CHM three times a day during the summer in addition to weekly interactive presentations by artists, historians, and other culture-bearers.

Number of children given free presents through Pine Ridge Christmas Fund

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

CHMF provides Christmas gifts for students on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Students submit lists for gifts ranging from blankets and clothing to bicycles and art kits and receive all items requested.

Total number of Native artists participating in cultural programming

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Academics, Artists and performers

Related Program

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In addition to artist residencies and cultural performances, CHMF provides opportunities for Native artists to create, exhibit, and sell their artworks and crafts, as well as interact with visitors.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation realizes its mission and goals through three major projects: the Mountain Carving, THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®, and THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA®.

The Mountain Carving depicts Lakota leader Crazy Horse riding his steed out of the Black Hills of South Dakota (He Sapa), gesturing forward, and proclaiming, “My lands are where my dead lie buried.” We remain committed to the promise sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski made to Chief Henry Standing Bear and other Native elders in response to their invitation to Korczak to sculpt and maintain a Memorial celebrating Native American culture. Today, the mountain carving of Crazy Horse Memorial stands as a beacon to the world, raising interest and welcoming all to visit, learn, and be inspired by the culture, traditions, and living heritage of the indigenous people.

The Memorial is an educational and humanitarian endeavor with the goal of fostering understanding and healing between Natives and non-Natives through rich and vibrant educational and cultural programming and the art and artifacts presented in THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA®. We share the history and contemporary life of the indigenous people of Native Nations throughout the North American continent by mindfully preserving and exhibiting Native American art and artifacts. Additionally, vibrant educational and cultural programs of the Museum teach worldwide visitors about Native Americans. Visitors also learn through the exhibits featured in the Mountain Carving Gallery and the Ziolkowski Family Life Museum.

THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® has an overarching goal of improving the college persistence and graduation rates of Native Americans. Presently, the postsecondary degree attainment rates for American Indian/Alaskan Natives is 23%, the lowest of all racial/minority groups and significantly lower than the 47% national average for all students.

The summer program provides first-year college students with 12 transferable credit hours in a culturally-relevant and supportive environment, jump-starting their college careers. The program outcomes for the 15 credit hour fall semester Wizipan Sustainability and Leadership Certificate Program are to assist in closing the Native American higher education achievement gap; to create a generation of ethically responsible people who will care for the four pillars of self, community, environment, and culture; and to transform Native American communities through the study and application of leadership and sustainability principles. Our commitment is to the past, present, and future of Native Nations. Through The Indian University of North America, we provide Native youth education, experience, and resources to assist them in successfully launching and completing their college goals to attain their full potential and ultimately, give back to their Native communities.

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation has strategic benchmarks in each of the three major parts of the project.

The Mountain Carving Crew is focused on carving Crazy Horse's Hairline, left Hand, Arm, right Shoulder, and part of the Horse's Mane and Head in the next 5-10 years. The biggest factors impacting progress include weather, safety, and funding.

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® and NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER® have goals of inventorying collections, along with finalizing the accreditation process through the American Alliance of Museums. In addition, we are in the process of organizing the museum into a comprehensive narrative with seven cultural concepts/galleries featuring: Stone Dreamers and Thunder Dreamer; Geography; Home and Community; Ecology and Food; Adornment; Leadership; and Modern and Contemporary Art. Each gallery will discuss its designated topic through the lens of eight eco-regions: the Arctic, Pacific Northwest, the Southwest, Great Plains, Northeast (Woodlands), the Southeast, Central America, and the Hawaiian Islands. The Modern and Contemporary Art Gallery has already been created. This space was recently remodeled, and art was selected to represent the eight eco-regions.

THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® furthers its goal of increasing college entry, persistence, and graduation rates with each class. For each university program, we incorporate Student Success Coaches who guide our former students through their entire college journey. Most coaches are Native American. Through the student success coaching process, our coaches both encourage students and keep track of how students are progressing. Students are encouraged to reach out to their coach if they are feeling discouraged or facing difficulties. Even the most independent students have said it is valuable to know that someone is there if they ever need the support. The summer programs at The University of North America has proven to provide a very significant boost to Native American college success and completion, and we expect very similar results from the fall Wizipan Sustainability program and additional future programming. Of the summer cohorts eligible for college graduation, 59% of the individuals have earned a college degree or certificate.

The capabilities of Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation grow annually. The number of Mountain Carving Crew members has increased over the past few years and uses traditional and state-of-the art techniques and technologies to plan and execute all work.

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® has a cadre of professional staff and is currently working to create a thorough inventory of the Museum's 11,000+ artworks and artifacts, 90% which have been donated. Once complete, this inventory will be a comprehensive and searchable database and aid in creating a more impactful and narrative-driven set of exhibits organized in seven gallery concepts.

Crazy Horse's ability to meet its goals is evidenced by eleven successful years of the summer program and one year of the fall program of THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA®, which has now enrolled over 300 Native students from 40 Native communities and 20 states. The University's signature student success coaching is a significant part of the services offered through THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA. The latest annual research on college persistence and college completion of participants revealed that 80% of the students continue to be enrolled in college or have graduated, based on an impressive 89% response rate.

Since completing Crazy Horse’s Face in 1998, the Mountain Carving Crew has focused on Crazy Horse’s outstretched left Arm, Hand, right Shoulder and Hairline, and portions of the Horse’s Mane and Head, all of which are projected to be finished in 5-10 years. New carving technologies and increased funding have fostered great progress. The plan to finish this phase of the carving is on track.

THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA® and NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL CENTER® are meeting its goal of telling the true stories of Native Americans through the display of Native art and artifacts with consultation with the respective Native Nations. Two ( The Modern and Contemporary Art and Leadership Galleries) of the following seven, new Galleries will be completed as the Memorial enters the 2021 season. Each Gallery features relevant art and artifacts of that theme from eight different eco-regions throughout North America. The eight eco-regions include 1. The Artic 2. Northwest 3. Northeast Woodlands 4. The Plains 5. The Southeast 6. The Southwest
7. Central America, and 8 Hawaiian Islands.
THE NEW GALLERIES
1. Stone Dreamers and The Thunder Dreamer
2. Geography
3. Home and Community
4. Ecology and Food
5. Regalia and Adornment
6. Leadership
7. Modern and Contemporary Art

Crazy Horse Memorial continues to make progress towards completing the seven new Galleries. The work of THE INDIAN MUSEUM OF NORTH AMERICA also includes building a bridge to harmony and healing among Natives and non-Natives through its robust cultural programs. The 2021 season of Native performers, cultural bearers, lecturers, and artists have been chosen. These Native Americans will educate the public about how Native wisdom and principles can strengthen our world for all people.

Since 2010, THE INDIAN UNIVERSITY OF NORTH AMERICA® has provided Native American students entering their first year of college a semester of transferable credits mentorship through college and beyond. Plans are underway for year-round programming, further increasing the number of Native students who hold college degrees. Over 300 students from over 40 different Native Nations have completed programs of the Indian University and have received the valuable student success coaching. Latest research, with an 89% response rate, revealed that 80% of the students remain in college or have graduated. The college graduates are employed in a multitude of professions such as Medical Technician, Teacher, Nurse, Museum Curator Assistant, Digital Strategist, Manager, Buyer of Medical Supplies, Dental Hygienist, Native American Recruitment Coordinator, Case Manager, Social Worker, and many other professions. Many former students are also seeking Master's degrees and PhD's.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We seek feedback from the visiting public, donors who provide charitable gifts to the Memorial, and from the students we serve.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback has brought our constituents closer to the Memorial. They appreciate that we have taken the time to hear their voice.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CRAZY HORSE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 4/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Steve Helmers

Crazy Horse Memorial Foundation

Term: 2019 - 2024

Mary Abu-Ghazaleh

Roger Broer

F. Joseph DuBray

Dr. Sidney Goss

Dr. Richard Gowen

Kay Jorgensen

David Olson

Amanda Scott

Mary Scull

Wes Shelton

Lloyd Sohl

Steve Rasmussen

Barry Tice

Dr. Laurel Vermillion

Dan Warren

Caleb Ziolkowski

Monique Ziolkowski

Vaughn Ziolkowski

Steve Helmers

Della Burns

Mark Hutchings

Jeremy Patterson

Troy Weston

Alexander Zephier III

Don Montileaux

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.