UNITED MILITARY CARE INC

What starts here changes lives!

Marietta, GA   |  www.unitedmilitarycare.org

Mission

Mission: United Military Care preserves and enhances the quality of life for Georgia Military Families and Veterans : By supporting physical, mental and emotional health and development for all members of the family, Strengthening the families economic outlook through education, budgeting, employment and financial aid Through supportive events, collaborations and programs, Advocating for military families in local, state and national arenas concerning lifestyle and security issues affecting military families

Ruling year info

2012

President

Ms. Kimberly D. Scofi

Main address

1220 Old Canton Road

Marietta, GA 30062 USA

Show more addresses

EIN

46-0552042

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

United Military Care addresses four pillars of care for Veterans throughout Georgia: Hunger, Isolation & Socialization, and Homelessness through three programs, Battle Buddy 4 Life, Veteran Strong, and our Emergency Response Team. Hunger, homelessness, unemployment, isolation, mental health challenges, and no sense of community lead to a high rate of Veterans on the street, in medical facilities, divorce, and early death. Our programs take into consideration the Veteran and their support system as a whole to ensure all needs are being met. Our goal is to decrease the number of hospitalized and/or early deaths of Veterans while also eradicating hunger and homelessness among those who served in the military and increasing the level of satisfaction with life in general for all Veterans.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Response

United Military Care Emergency Response Team provides immediate food, hygiene supplies, clothing, and housing referrals for Veterans in crisis. This team also partners and responds to law enforcement calls 7 days a week, 24 hours a day when a homeless or hungry Veteran is located. Additionally, this team provides access to our food pantry including delivery for those unable to drive, household goods, cleaning supplies and food staples to help a family eat nutritionally for one month.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel
Caregivers
Widows and widowers
Non-adult children

The Battle Buddy 4 Life program partners Veterans with Veterans to solve the problems of isolation and loneliness while providing a conduit to community and government based services.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Economically disadvantaged people

United Military Care's Veteran Strong program connects Veterans with ongoing educational opportunities for mental health, fiscal budgeting, and responsibility, maintaining a healthy body and spirit.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Families
Veterans
Military personnel
Families
Veterans

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Georgia Department of Human Services, Division of Aging 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeowners/tenants rating their feeling of safety in and around their homes as satisfactory

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Seniors, Senior men, Senior women, Family relationships

Related Program

Battle Buddy 4 Life

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

First year testing of Battle Buddy program and clientele.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans

Related Program

Emergency Response

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Food, Emergency groceries, Meals, Nourishment, Clothing, Shoes, Winter Apparel, Homeless Assistance. *Note 2020 COVID Pandemic restrictions to one on one outreach.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal One: Increase activity levels of home-bound and/or isolated Veterans.

Goal Two: Increase of general feelings of well being for Veterans through assessment pre and post visits cumulatively.

Goal Three: Coordination of Veterans and collaborative resources available through governmental and non-governmental organizations for transportation, community meals, events, and social activities, and housing.

Goal Four: Promotion of good health and delay of adverse health onset monitored through continual dialogue with the Veteran. Generating awareness for the Veteran of available community resources promoting health such as well checks.

Goal Five: Provide safe outlets for Senior Veterans and vulnerable military families to discuss sensitive issues with licensed professionals such as financial, legal, and medical.

Strategy 1. Utilizing volunteers who are veterans to make in residence visits and imparting knowledge of existing services offered to seniors and veterans through extensive collaborative partnerships.

Strategy 2. Through awareness of available services, assist senior veterans with applications for transportation, meal delivery, social relief, medical care, and self-care provided by charitable and government institutions.

Strategy 3: Maintain a nutritionally balanced, easily accessible food supply to fight hunger and poor nutrition.

Strategy 3. Multi-channel promotion of healthy habits and activity which positively affects both mental and physical health, especially in Senior Veterans.

Strategy 4. To prevent and assist homeless Veterans with coordinated entry points for temporary shelter, affordable housing, governmental vouchers while helping Veterans.

Strategy 5. Providing employment resources and educational training for those Veterans unemployed or underemployed.

Strategy 6. Requiring all clients review personal and household budgeting, and offering resources to set up a budget and learn about smart money management at no cost.

Experience 1: United Military Care is staffed by personnel with over 100+ years of experience in business, and over 60+ years of non-profit administration, and health and human services programs. Additionally, our Leadership Council, Board of Directors and Senior Staff who work with clients and develop and review programs have extensive military experience and/or relation.

Education 2: In addition to our already in place strong and diverse team we provide continuing education opportunities for our staff and volunteers throughout the year as it relates to our clients, programs and current needs.

Community 3: United Military Care staff and board are involved with community groups and partners throughout our area to stay abreast of changes, needs and opportunities within our scope of care.

Commitment 4: Everyone on our team both Board, Leadership, Staff and Volunteers are evaluated for their level of commitment before assigning them to a program area or client. Our volunteers typically stay with their client/Battle Buddy on average of 1.3 years duration.

Our accomplishments include:
1. Extensive state-wide collaborative partnerships with both governmental and Non-governmental organizations of varying sizes and geographic coverage.

2. Increased support and funding from the community to support growing Veteran needs.

3. On average we help 75 homeless Veterans monthly with basic supplies and resources.

4. Approximately 8 Veterans and their families receive food for 1-3 months to help their financial position.

5. Positive testimony from Veterans with no suggested change to current programs.

6. Support, referrals, and endorsement from government and military organizations for level of care provided to clientele.

7. Non fluctuating staff and volunteer levels due to position satisfaction.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Military Veterans of all ages and all branches of military service, to include their families and caregivers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In 2020 we modified our Battle Buddy 4 Life program due to the COVID 19 pandemic and the need for Americans to quarantine at home. Prior to the pandemic our Battle Buddy Veterans would receive in person visits when requested. Due to CDC recommended guidelines we increased our outreach with additional telephone calls and safe distance drop offs to ensure our Veterans who were isolated were not lonely and had adequate food supply. Additionally, due to the pandemic, elderly Veterans and those who were ill and could not drive to obtain groceries for themselves had nutritious meals and food items delivered to their homes adhering to CDC recommendations. Veterans were supplied with disposable masks, anti-bacterial hand cleaner and gloves at the onset of the pandemic to prevent contamination.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback from our clients provides multiple communicable resources for our volunteers, donors, partners, and staff enabling us to provide compassionate, accurate, and timely services. Through feedback from our clients, we worked with a funder/community partner to launch a new program that helps Veterans better understand how money works to include budgeting, saving and investing.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

UNITED MILITARY CARE INC
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

UNITED MILITARY CARE INC

Board of directors
as of 3/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Illene Ruben

Retired

Term: 2018 - 2021

Illene Ruben

Matthew Woody

Elizabeth Auman, MSW

Kim Scofi

United Military Care

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/03/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.