CHILD-FRIENDLY FAITH PROJECT

Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment

aka CFFP   |   Daytona Beach, FL   |  http://childfriendlyfaith.org/

Mission

The Child-Friendly Faith Project envisions a world in which no child suffers abuse or neglect as a result of religious belief, doctrine, or practice. To that end, the CFFP shares knowledge and builds community around the issue of religious child maltreatment (RCM) and advocates for and empowers those whose lives are impacted by RCM.

Ruling year info

2012

Board President

Rev. Dr. Jaime Romo

Main address

PO Box 2135

Daytona Beach, FL 32115 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-0907491

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children throughout the US and the world suffer child abuse or neglect enabled by religious belief every day.The impacts of this maltreatment are serious and long-term; for some, they are fatal. Religious child maltreatment can occur in any faith or community, and it's important to understand which children are at risk.

Religious organizations in the US collectively have paid billions of dollars settling lawsuits with those they have harmed. High-profile cases of religious child maltreatment regularly appear in the news. You can find memoirs written by survivors who grew up in just about every religion, spiritual group, and cult.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Designation Program

This program helps faith communities discuss and learn about religious child maltreatment and to increase membership. Religious organizations complete the program using a study guide, facilitated by one of their own members while being mentored by a liaison of the CFFP. Benefits include an increased awareness of children’s emotional, educational, and spiritual needs and an understanding of how to best prevent maltreatment, including that which is enabled by religious beliefs and practices. In addition, each of those faith communities is designated as a Charter Member of the CFFP which allows it to be seen as a role model of child protection and attractive to families seeking to join places of worship.

Population(s) Served
Interfaith groups
Families

Our conferences feature speakers who are nationally and internationally renowned experts in fields related to child welfare, faith, and the law. Our conference attendees have included representatives of faith organizations and professionals, such as social workers, clergy, attorneys, youth program directions, therapists and others

Population(s) Served
Adults

Each year, the CFFP selects 5 nonprofit organizations that align with its mission and supports them by raising awareness of their goals and work through its marketing channels.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Non-adult children

The CFFP offers experts who can speak via webinar to professionals in child protection on the subject of religious child maltreatment. Audience groups may include social workers, physicians, attorneys, teachers, and law enforcement personnel.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This program provides to families of harmed children and survivors a database of attorneys and mental health professionals who have experience handling cases of religious child maltreatment.

Population(s) Served
Parents
Non-adult children

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Child-Friendly Faith Project envisions a world in which adults in faith communities better no longer justify child abuse or neglect with religious beliefs, scripture, or doctrines. Our goal is to help people better understand and talk about RCM, identify it and its risk factors, and to recognize its negative impact on children. While we strongly belief in a person's right to follow the tenets of one's faith, we want religious organizations and their members to realize that such a right, no matter how well-intentioned, does not extend so far that it results in harming a child.

Our strategy is to offer various groups of people needed resources so that they can learn about religious child maltreatment, its risk factors, and impact, and gain resources for support and advocacy. The audiences we reach include the general public, professionals in child protection and child advocates, survivors of religious child maltreatment, and faith communities.

1. We engage with the General Public and the Media.
Our website offers extensive resources on RCM. We oversee social media outlets that allow the public to discuss and learn about this issue, and we give media interviews and slideshow presentations at meetings and conferences.

2. We support and advocate for Survivors.
We maintain a clearinghouse of resources to help survivors of RCM find reputable therapeutic programs, and we advocate on behalf of survivors seeking to communicate with religious institutions and organizations that have harmed them. An example of this work is what we have been doing on behalf of survivors of Cal Farley's Boys Ranch.

3. We educate Faith Communities and Professionals.
We offer curricula to faith communities and information to professionals who work in the field of child protection to help them learn how to better prevent RCM and respond to cases. One religious organization that served as a pilot site was Unity of Austin.

4. We partner with other Child Advocates.
Thankfully, there are many other child advocacy organizations doing great work. We promote their programs, share resources, and make join presentations at events. An example is our efforts to help Protect Idaho Kids raise awareness of harmful religious exemptions that have led to 183 children dying from medical neglect.

5. We contribute to Academic Research.
Our website offers researchers a unique clearinghouse of verified academic study into the subject of religious child maltreatment and tangential topics. This program area will be made public with the launch of the CFFP's revised website in 2018.

The Child-Friendly Faith Project is considered by many to be the "go to" authoritative voice on the subject of religious child maltreatment. All our programs are being achieved through a vast, international network of advocates who care about the issue of religious child maltreatment. They include experts, child advocates, survivors, contractors, and volunteers. Our board of directors and advisors include some of the country's most esteemed authors, professors, and religious leaders on this issue. Furthermore, we have deep digital marketing channels to carry out our educational mission that include a well-developed website, social media platforms, a compelling video series, email blasts, and blog. In fact, our organization's resources that are continually updated on our website are likely the most comprehensive set of resources that focus on the issue of religious child maltreatment.

Our accomplishments, so far, include the following:

- We have held two successful national conferences in Austin, Texas.
- We have released our unique Designation Program study guide for faith communities.
- We have collected one of the most comprehensive set of resources on the subject of religious child maltreatment.
- In advocating for survivors of a North Texas institution, we have been able to convince the facility to pay for the daily-living needs of survivors in perpetuity.
- We have filed an amicus brief in a Texas Supreme Court case that could protect from abuse thousands of children attending religiously affiliated schools across the state.
- We oversee a Facebook group that offers support to approximately 700 members, most of whom are survivors of religious child maltreatment.

Financials

CHILD-FRIENDLY FAITH PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CHILD-FRIENDLY FAITH PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rev. Dr. Jaime Romo

Kaiser Permanente

Term: 2018 -

Jaime Romo

Hospice Chaplain, Kaiser Permanente

Barbara Dorris

Nali Adesso

Private Practice

Janet Heimlich

Child-Friendly Faith Project

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.