Youth Development

TRIANGLE BIKEWORKS INC

Transforming Lives One Revolution At A Time

aka Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Carrboro, NC

Mission

The mission of Triangle Bikeworks (TBW) is to enrich the mind, body and spirit of youth through trans-formative community, cultural and cycling experiences. TBW is a youth development organization that provides youth of color with fun, challenging, history-based experiences on bikes. The tours provide experiential learning and context to achievements made by people of color unlike anything they'll experience in traditional classroom settings. As a result they walk away a new person with confidence in their achievements during the tour and that of those who came before them.

Ruling Year

2014

CEO

Kevin Hicks

Main Address

117 West Main Street

Carrboro, NC 27510 USA

Formerly Known As

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Keywords

Student Operated Business; After School Programs; Character Development for Youth; Future Leaders of America;

EIN

46-1229632

 Number

4784604852

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Single Organization Support (O11)

Business, Youth Development (O53)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

The Chapel Hill Carrboro City Schools have identified persistent achievement gaps which show their minority students underperform compared to their white counterparts and consistently score lower than the state average in many categories. A recent chart of end-of-grade and end-of-course scores show that only 31% of black students and 40% of Latino students were in the college-ready range, compared to 85 percent of white students. Evidence shows that high-quality summer learning programs and out-of-school activities set students up for success in school, in college, and in life. This is especially true for low–income minority students, a population that has been underserved. Summer interventions can have extraordinary and lasting impacts on students while preventing months of learning loss, which can accumulate over years. TBW was created to address these issues by providing a unique cycling program (one of only 2 such programs in the country) that helps prevent summer learning loss

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

1 3 4 5 6 10 12 13 16

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Biking Summer Camp

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of donations made by board members

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who value social harmony

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years)

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donors retained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Number of donors continuing to support organization

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years),

Minorities,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed skills and attitudes to make physical activity a habit

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed cultural competence

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed a strong sense of self

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program graduates

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years),

Minorities,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years),

Minorities,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

these numbers include students and parents

Number of youth who model positive behaviors for peers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Adolescents (13-19 years),

Minorities,

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Spoke'n Revolutions Youth Cycling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

We are laying a foundation for youth to become successful adults by providing opportunities to improve self esteem, build their confidence, obtain skills and establish a lifelong habit of physical activity. We do this by providing opportunity for underserved youth to explore their local and national environments so they can see and understand how they can impact the world around them and make a contribution to society. Our programs extend learning and presents experiential opportunities centering on history and culture.

Our path to sustainability is to create a youth run bicycle shop that will employ, train and fund the operations and programming of Triangle Bikeworks. The shop will refurbish bicycles for purchase. Which in turn, lowers the barrier of inclusion for under-served families. The youth will be trained in business administration, retail experience and bicycle mechanics. Giving them experience for future employment. We want cycling as common and competitive for youth of color as football, basketball and soccer.

To successfully scale up the number of YouthCycle participants we have adopted three equally ambitious strategies. We will increase our organizational capacity for recruiting, training, and securing employment for these participants.

First, we will enhance our community reach by developing additional partners to recruit and place participants, train instructors, develop curriculum and related materials. These partnerships can also provide bicycles, tools, and instructional facilities. We will continue to work closely with existing partners to provide education, advocacy, out-reach, and technical support as needs arise.

Second, we will initiate programming in our newly constructed welding and fabrication workshop. The location has proven extremely valuable for access to additional resources compared to off-site locations we have depended upon in the past. We will also use this space in conjunction with other available spaces such as the mechanics workshop of Ciclo Urbano, our sales and service bike shop.

Third, we will enrich the knowledge and expertise of our staff by encouraging them to take advantage of various educational and/or professional development opportunities throughout the Chicago area. Wright Vocational Center and Oakton Community College offer local metalworking and fabrication courses that focus on arc welding, metal brazing, torch cutting, bead blasting, and other metalworking processes. The League of American Bicyclists offers Certified Instructor Training that enables successful participants to teach safe cycling techniques while The Division Street Business Development Association offers the FastTrac Business Planning Course for business plan development.

The way we accomplish our goals with our high school program is by providing youth with their own bicycles and cycling gear. They participate in team rides in the piedmont NC countryside to build comradery, stamina, and confidence on the bike, and to expose them to the outdoors in their home community. They experience educational lectures throughout the school year on the social, historical and environmental issues connected with the upcoming tour. Tour routes are created that inspire connection to the natural world that help youth develop an understanding of the impact that historical events have on the present. Along with participating in community service projects to give back to their community and gain useful skills. All the training and educational activities are in preparation for a 2-week long, 700-mile summer cycling tour based on culturally significant and historic routes. Youth cyclists average 55 miles a day, visit state/national parks and historic sites along the route, and camp most nights. The youth participate in teamwork activities during the tour such as: rotation of campsite duties, writing and/or recording daily reflections from the day, and participating in team roundtables where they share experiences in a safe and non-judgemental setting.

TBW has many partners that help us fulfill our mission. The Carolina Tarwheels Bicycle Club is a local cycling club that regularly provides funding for the cycling tour. Youth Forward is a youth organization that provides technical assistance and program funding. YouthWorx on Main is a nonprofit collaborative for youth serving organizations that houses the TBW office.

The Chapel Hill Carrboro City Schools provide assistance with youth recruitment. The Refuge Community Partnership assists with youth recruitment. Local bike shops help with reduced cost maintenance of bikes and parts and community members donate bicycles, gear, and clothing for our student athletes.

Triangle Bikeworks has a diversified mix of funding that includes: Funding from family foundations, individual community donations, and local nonprofit and cycling organizations.

In order to diversify our revenue streams, we partner with the Abundance Foundation in Pittsboro, NC to provide a unique summer camp experience called Bikes & Barnyards. This summer camp introduces middle and high school youth from all backgrounds to several forms of biking, sustainable farming and experiential summer fun. Camp profits benefit the programs of Triangle Bikeworks. TBW plans to sustainably grow the summer camp program to increase revenue.


We always count on previous tour participant graduates as adult support personnel. These young adults understood bike touring and are knowledgeable enough to suggest process improvements.

At TBW, success can be defined in quantifiable terms of miles cycled, increased rates of confidence and self-esteem, and college graduation rates. We also measure our success through the stories of the individual young people that we are fortunate to work with.

Measurable outcomes:

1. Cycling Advocacy - we track the number of youth that have been introduced to cycling as a healthy lifestyle. To date, over 37 youth have successfully completed our program and a significant cycling tour, making them proficient cyclists. Youth in our program ride an average of 1000 miles each a year.

2. Assessing changes in attitudes, skills, behaviors, and knowledge - SnR staff administer pre- and post- tour surveys in order to measure self-esteem, self-confidence, problem solving and communication skills. Tour staff evaluate youth during the tour through observation and tracking behavior counts.

3. Graduation rates - we track the number of SnR participants that graduate from high school and go on to attend college. SnR tour graduates have a high school graduation rate of 100% and a college acceptance rate of 90%.

We have completed 7 successful summer bike tours:
-Underground Railroad
-Lewis & Clark/Buffalo Soldiers/ Pacific Coastal Trail
-Blues & Jazz History/ Mississippi River Valley Trail
-King 2 King (from Atlanta, GA to Washington, DC linking the Dr. King Historic Site with the Dr. King Memorial)
-Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
-Trail of Tears

In 2016, 100% of SnR participants graduated from high school and 90% went to college
80% of participants had increased fitness…..
80% of participants reported increased levels of self esteem

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, it is hard to come up with good questions to ask people.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

TRIANGLE BIKEWORKS INC

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/23/2020

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender Identity
Male
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 03/23/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
done
We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.