GOLD2024

Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc.

aka Third Sector   |   Boston, MA   |  www.thirdsectorcap.org

Mission

Third Sector’s mission is to transform public systems to advance improved and equitable outcomes. Third Sector uses public funding and data as levers to impact how governments, providers, and their partners work with and improve the lives of the people they serve. This process leads to quantifiable improvements in people’s lives by creating new incentives to inspire sustainable operational changes. When our work is complete, organizations entrusted to use public and private funds will have the systems, tools, and data to do more and do better for the people they serve. Founded in 2011, Third Sector is a 501(c)3 organization that has worked with more than 40 communities to deploy more than $1.2 billion of government resources towards outcomes.

Ruling year info

2014

Principal Officer

Caroline Whistler

Main address

P.O. Box 962004

Boston, MA 02196 USA

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EIN

46-1301032

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Social service delivery is serious, complex, and expensive. Governments at all levels are the largest funders of social sector, spending trillions of dollars per year on these programs. Philanthropy provides billions of dollars more to catalyze and supplement those programs. And yet, this massive universe of funding is often not allocated based on which programs are the most effective. We see a need to change that by helping entities connect resources to results. By doing so, we can drive systematic improvements in services that advance people’s lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Children and Families

Third Sector has worked with communities across the country to reallocate more than $5M of public funding that support efforts to stabilize families nationwide. These programs are reducing the number of days children spend in foster care, providing support for at-risk youth dually involved in both child welfare and juvenile justice systems, expanding prenatal home visitation for high-risk, low-income mothers, and more.

Population(s) Served
Families

Third Sector has engaged county and state governments, along with high-performing service providers, to assess the feasibility of outcomes-oriented contracts as a means to expand access, enhance quality, and improve outcomes of preschool and post-secondary services available to low income children as well as opportunity, out-of-school youth and adults.
Third Sector helps local stakeholders develop recommendations to improve priority outcomes such as academic achievement, social emotional development, and attendance in working to improve early education. For adult learners, Third Sector works to help providers provide flexibility for students and remove barriers, and support student pathways to post-secondary education and the workforce.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Third Sector works with communities to help build the capacity of service providers around outcomes orientation, improve timely access to health care and develop connections to routine care. Through our engagements, we have supported programs to improve maternal and child health home visitation as well as worked to reduce lead poisoning, among others. We have launched two outcomes-oriented contracts that will potentially serve more than 22,250 individuals.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Third Sector works with county and state governments to address the causes of homelessness resulting in increased housing stability and wellbeing of individual and families. In addressing the complex and intertwined issues of homelessness, substance abuse, criminal justice reform, and economic mobility, our partners are able to provide evidence-based services to their residents. As a result, individuals and families experiencing homelessness are able to receive housing support and wraparound services that meet individual and families needs with the goals of housing stability and improved economic, emotional, and physical wellbeing. Many projects to date have had a specific focus on the interplay between the criminal justice and homelessness systems and providing increased access to ongoing physical and behavioral health services.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Third Sector is working to drive outcomes that result in the reduction of crime and the promotion of safer and stronger communities. With our partners, we help to develop programming that aims to reduce recidivism and aims to increase employment through a variety of approaches including mentorship, intensive outreach, and education and workforce training. Through three launched contracts addressing justice issues, we have reallocated $51.2M of public funding and engaged more than 1,600 individuals in these outcomes-oriented programs.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people

At Third Sector, we work with communities across the country to help job seekers gain the skills they need to succeed. We are helping to improve education, workforce, and business systems to improve economic opportunities to vulnerable individuals. Our work with communities across the nation is improving outcomes and increasing the number of people receiving valuable services.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of policies changed to align government systems with outcomes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of data sharing agreements across government agencies and service providers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Dollars deployed through contracts with incentives for outcomes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As of June 2021 we have shifted $1.2B in government funding towards an outcomes focus.

Number of services using evidence-based practices and continuous improvement

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals receiving services under outcomes-oriented contracts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our mission is to transform public systems to advance improved and equitable outcomes. Historically, government contracts for social services based on outputs rather than outcomes. This means that service providers receive funding based on metrics like how many people they served or how many services they provide. We envision a world where the social sector is driven by the impact of the work rather than the amount, seeking quality care rather than only the quantity of it. This means a social sector that contracts for services based on the outcomes each individual served sees from their engagement with social services. When our work is complete, organizations entrusted to use public and private funds will have the systems, tools, and data to do more and do better for the people they serve.

Third Sector incorporates data-driven monitoring, evaluation and continuous improvement into service delivery systems to help improve the lives of people served by a government. Our collaborations with clients enable them to make stronger connections between dollars spent and the impact of services provided. These systems align policy, dollars, services and data to incentivize improved outcomes for individuals and communities:
- Policy measures link funding to measurable outcomes, increasing flexibility and transparency of government operations;
- Innovative contracts create incentives for coordination, innovation, and continuous improvement;
- Shared data allows government and providers to align services with community needs;
- Measurable outcomes inform data- and evidence-based decision making.

Third Sector facilitates a process called outcomes focused technical assistance (OFTA) which includes the following steps:

SET GOALS: Build consensus among key stakeholders on the most important outcomes to be improved for a given population with explicitly focus on equity for underserved communities.
USE DATA: Analyze existing quantitative data from administrative sources and qualitative data from stakeholders in order to understand current outcomes, uncover inequities, and establish key outcome metrics
PARTNER: Develop and implement strategies to overcome barriers caused by program silos through partnerships and collaboration around funding, enrollment, service delivery and data
INCENTIVIZE: Create meaningful incentives for the achievement of both near- and longer-term outcome goals, including the use of outcomes-based funding
IMPLEMENT: Identify and implement a set of evidence-informed, cross-cutting practices that have the greatest potential to drive better outcomes and address inequities
ASSESS: Develop and implement an assessment strategy to determine the impact of system change against the stated goals and metrics of success
LEARN: Create a robust continuous improvement process to regularly review data and adapt as needed to keep improving results.
SYSTEMATIZE: Devise strategies to sustain and scale revised management policies, practices and behaviors once feasibility and impact is established

With an evidence-based approach, our process provides insights to operations that leads to long-term, sustainable, quantifiable changes.

Since 2011, we have worked alongside communities to help realize a thriving future of educational opportunity, economic mobility, housing stability, and physical and mental health. In order to improve lives at scale, we advise communities on shaping equitable systems. In this process we bring to light systemic biases based on factors such as race, ethnicity, income, and location. We seek out and elevate diverse local perspectives and foster an inclusive environment where these voices are centered in the decision-making process. We acknowledge the responsibility that comes with directing resources. We embrace an equity-centered approach that leverages data and best practices, while involving those closest to the challenge in designing effective solutions.

The Third Sector team has deep experience across the public, private, and nonprofit sectors.

Third Sector has led 65 engagements with governments, nonprofits, private investors, and researchers across the United States, with 42 county-level engagements, 19 state-level engagements, and 4 national cohorts of public agencies working to implement outcomes-oriented funding for human services. We have partnered with governments to deploy $1.2B towards measurable results for communities through over 400 outcomes-focused contracts across over 20 projects. This shift in government funding will promote better outcomes in critical areas including mental health, homelessness, family stability, and economic opportunity for more than 120,000 people, including 95,000 low-income children, youth, and parents.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Third Sector Capital Partners, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/19/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Reggie Bicha

American Public Human Services Association

Mishaela Duran

Forum for Youth Investment

John Kania

Applied Materials

Gary Graves

Retired/ Santa Clara County

Janine Lee

Philanthropy Southeast

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/13/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.