Human Services

FATHER MCKENNA CENTER INC

Meeting Needs...Reclaiming Lives

aka The Father McKenna Center, Inc   |   Washington, DC   |  www.fathermckennacenter.org

Mission

Mission: To accompany and care for families struggling with poverty and men facing homelessness by providing food, shelter, clothing and services to support their journey toward stability, productivity, meaning and hope, building upon the good works, ideals and values of Father Horace McKenna, S.J. Vision: People who struggle with poverty and homelessness will have access to the resources they need to create and sustain lives of stability, productivity, meaning and hope. Values: We believe that all persons are made in the image and likeness of God and as such deserve to be treated with respect and dignity. We believe that people who struggle with poverty and homelessness deserve access to material, spiritual and support resources that will lead to stability and meaning in their lives.

Ruling year info

2013

President

Dr. Kimberly Kay Cox

Main address

19 Eye Street, NW

Washington, DC 20001 USA

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EIN

46-1406974

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Father McKenna Center works to improve the level of living for men who are currently experiencing homelessness and for low-income families who struggle with food insecurity. The obstacles facing men who are homeless can be overwhelming. This challenge often leads to paralysis. The Father McKenna Center has developed a path to a better life that consists of small achievable steps to ending homelessness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Day Program for Men who Experience Homelessness

The largest program of The Father McKenna Center is the Day Program for men who struggle with homelessness. The Day Program is a “drop-in” program that welcomes guests into the Center to meet their immediate needs while providing case management and other support to assist our guests to identify the obstacles they face and to develop strategies to overcome those obstacles so that they can reclaim their lives. Open Monday through Friday from 7:00 am to 1:30 pm, with special programs in the afternoon, the Day Program provides a safe and secure environment for homeless men to develop the individual strategies they need to move toward stability, productivity and meaning in their lives. Each day more than 100 men come to the Center for one of many services provided, including two meals (breakfast and lunch), showers, laundry, clothing, and access to computers, phone and mail. These basic human services are an invitation to a deeper relationship of trust with the staff and our case managers. During fiscal 2017, 1,833 unique individuals made 26,274 visits to The Father McKenna Center. We served over 28,000 meals to men in the program. The Father McKenna Center is dedicated to upholding and honoring the dignity of each one of our guests. One aspect of this approach is our program to make showers and laundry available daily. On average 17 men were able to take a shower each day for a total of 4,280 showers over the course of the year. Our laundry services washed approximately 100 loads of laundry each month, for nearly 1,200 loads of laundry in fiscal 2017. Our most important work in this program is through case management. We focus on case management and referral services to help our guests recognize their full potential. The case management team held 2,900 consultations over the 2017 fiscal year. This includes 740 intake consultations for men who are new to our program. The case managers listen carefully to each guest and formulate a unique plan to guide him on the journey to a better life. Frequently this includes a referral to one of our partners for additional services, such as housing, rehabilitation for addiction, job training, mental or physical health or to obtain an ID. In fiscal 2017 the case management team made 1,220 referrals, including 147 referrals for mental health services. IDs were obtained by 135 of our guests, giving them access to additional services in the District. Additional support for men who face homelessness is provided in our Daily Support Group meeting, bi-monthly Peace Building Assemblies and Spirituality/Faith Sharing group, and weekly Peace Circle meetings. On a regular basis the Director of Services facilitates a Recidivism Prevention Program. These programs offer a specialized opportunity for men to move forward to stability, productivity and meaning in life.

Population(s) Served
Males
Budget
$719,358

The Food Pantry provides low income families from Ward 6 in Washington, D.C. the opportunity to secure supplemental groceries. The Father McKenna Center provides an array of groceries (milk, eggs, meat, breads, fresh produce and a variety of nonperishable foods) to help our neighbors fill the gap in their food budgets. The value of a bag of groceries is approximately $65.00. Many low income families receive SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistant program) support – formerly called “Food Stamps.” Cuts to SNAP in 2017 have meant most families receiving assistance have enough aid to purchase 20 – 22 days’ worth of food. As a result, The Father McKenna Center’s Food Pantry has seen an increase in demand for its offerings this year. In fiscal 2017, patrons of our Food Pantry made 3, 574 visits. This is a 14% increase over 2016 (2016 saw 3,138 visits) and an 18% increase over 2015 (2,043 visits). The Pantry serves 12 – 17 families daily or approximately 200 different families each month. In fiscal 2017, over 500 different families accessed our Food Pantry. The Food Pantry is open each day (Monday – Friday). Families may visit the Food Pantry twice per month, with two weeks between visits. In Fiscal Year 2017, we provided food to support more than 45,000 meals in our community. The Food Pantry is supported by our partnership with the Capital Area Food Bank, and by canned food drives and contributions from Holy Trinity Parish (Georgetown), Gonzaga College High School, Visitation High School, St. Peter’s School, and other groups that donate via ad hoc canned food drives. Our fresh produce program was made possible through the generosity of 30 donors. The Food Pantry offers a special program of Thanksgiving Baskets for our patrons each November. In fiscal 2017, 225 families received a turkey and a basket of “fixins” to make a Thanksgiving dinner to share with family members and friends. At Christmas time we offer a Christmas dinner basket to the senior citizens who are members of our Food Pantry. Fifty-one senior citizens participated in this program in FY 2017.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Budget
$164,804

The Hypothermia/Transition Program offers up to 20 men a warm, safe and secure place to sleep out of the cold, a quality evening meal provided and served by Gonzaga College High School families, and targeted case management services with the goal of finding a job and a permanent place to live. The Program opens on November 1 and continues every night through March 31 each year. The men in the Program set specific goals and work on them with the encouragement of a dedicated case manager. In fiscal 2017, 27 different men participated in the Program. Over 70% of the participants reached one or more of his goals. On a weekly basis the men participate in a group meeting facilitated by the Director of Services to highlight issues that are common to men facing homelessness and to manage the issues that grow out of living in community. The men in the Hypothermia/Transition Program are encouraged to complete the Recidivism Prevention Program offered at the Center. In fiscal 2017 half of the men in the Hypothermia/ Transition Program completed a Basic Computer Skills class offered by Byte Back and held at The Father McKenna Center.

Population(s) Served
Males
Budget
$88,185

The Father McKenna Center welcomes student groups from across the country for a week of service and learning. Students volunteer in the Center, preparing meals, meeting our guests, helping in the Food Pantry and supporting other services that we offer. The Center offers reflections and meets with the students to challenge them to see people who face poverty and hunger in new ways. “When I arrived, I thought of the homeless as a ‘demographic.’ Now I know that they are individuals like me,” wrote one student. In fiscal 2017, 11 different high schools, colleges and universities participated in the Immersion Service/Learning Program, bringing 110 students and their leaders into the Center. Through this Program we are working to form the hearts and minds of young people to be “Men and Women With and For Others.”

Population(s) Served
Students

Volunteers are the lifeblood of The Father McKenna Center. Volunteers are the hearts and hands that make the services and programs at the Center possible. From serving breakfast or lunch to distributing mail, volunteers touch the lives of the people we serve. Both our clothing distribution and our Food Pantry are staffed almost entirely by volunteers. Nearly 600 individuals volunteered at The Father McKenna Center in fiscal 2017. They provided over 16,000 hours of service to people in need. This is the equivalent of more than 7 full-time employees.

Population(s) Served
General/Unspecified

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

In the Day Program for Men Currently Experiencing Homelessness and the Hypothermia/Transition Program, we work to raise the level of living for men who struggle with homelessness by accompanying them on the journey toward stability and meaning in life. The staff and volunteers who work at the Center believe that every person who walks through our doors deserves and can achieve a better life. Much of the work is dedicated to helping our guests in the Day Program believe that they in fact deserve a better life and that there is a path to attain that goal. The journey leads to housing and/or employment and/or reunification with family members. By providing for basic needs, the case managers can help men focus on the necessary steps to changing their lives. In the Greg Gannon Food Pantry we provide healthy groceries to our low-income neighbors to ensure they have good nutrition to support work and learning, and can remain housed by saving scarce financial resources to pay rent/mortgages and utilities.

In the Day Program for Men Currently Experiencing Homelessness, we have a proven path from homelessness to stability and housing. This path is called The Better Life Pyramid. The Better Life Pyramid takes the overwhelming task of resolving the problem of homelessness and breaks it in to clear, achievable steps. Case managers work closely with the men as they take on the obstacles and challenges that have led to this difficult life status. All steps are based in recognizing and upholding the dignity of each man. It is important to establish trust in both the case managers and the institution. We offer breakfast and lunch, showers, clothing, access to a telephone and computers - all as an invitation into a relationship of trust. We believe that men cam make more progress if they have resources upon which to draw. In the Day Program men are encouraged to take advantage of the programs that are offered, such as Peace Circle, Restorative Justice Circle, Recidivism Prevention Workshop and others. As men make progress, we have many partners in this space to which we make referrals, whether for housing, job training, mental health support or drug/alcohol rehabilitation. In the Greg Gannon Food Pantry we work closely with the Capital Area Food Bank to procure staple goods as well as fresh fruits and vegetables and meat. The Center also provides milk and eggs and fresh bread.

The Father McKenna Center is well positioned to fulfill our mission. We have just completed a $3 million renovation of our space (the basement of a church built in 1859) to create a facility that truly functions as a social services Center. The restroom and shower facilites have been remodels to provide a dignified experience. The facility now includes a dedicated classroom to facilitate the personal and emotional growth of our guests. The staff has been very stable over the past five years. The President has served for over five years and led both the capital campaign and the renovation effort. The Director of Services, who works most closely with our guests, has been at the Center for over 10 years, and has extensive experience in addictions counseling. The Director of Development has been with the Center for over six years, and has been very successful at increasing both the number and size of donations in his tenure. The Board of Directors is very engaged and committed to this work. Each Board member is active on at least one committee of the Board. Board members participate actively in opportunities to meet the people that we serve, such as helping in our Food Pantry or Clothing Closet. As a whole, the Board members contributed 14% of the funding needed for the renovations. We also have a very strong cohort of volunteers. The staff is small and we rely heavily on dedicated volunteers - many of whom function as staff, with job descriptions and responsibilities. Over 500 volunteers provided service to people in need in the 2019 fiscal year. The recent success of our capital campaign demonstrates that we have a solid donor base. Donors are well cared for and appreciate the good stewardship that we provide. We have a financial reserve that will allow us to function for nearly two years at the current level of expenditure should we experience significant financial uncertainties in the market. The Father McKenna Center has a very good reputation in our community and in our service space. We have numerous partners and collaborators to whom we can refer our guests and who share our goals.

The struggle to overcome homelessness is long and difficult. We measure success by the progress that guests make in The Better Life Pyramid. Each step completed brings a man closer to ending his plight of homelessness. Men who complete the program and find stability and housing are considered "McKenna Men." We stay connected to them and many of them return to the Center to speak with current guests to encourage them in their journeys. We consider that progress is made each time one of our guests chooses to take his mental health seriously and stays compliant with his health care provider, or when a man takes the difficult decision to face his addiction and chooses to go to a rehabilitation program. Other progress indicators include: the number of men who get an identification card, a social security card, health insurance. Each of these steps brings a man closer to stability and housing. In the Hypothermia/Transition Program, between 70% and 75% of the participants achieve one or more of their goals, such as obtaining suitable housing, finding a job, completing a job training program or reuniting with family. In the Greg Gannon Food Pantry, we measure the number of people who visit our Pantry, and the variety of goods that they have available to them. We look for indicators that the community is strengthened, such as people forming relationships, shopping for a neighbor who is ill, helping each other carry groceries home. An indicator that we are making progress is when current members of the pantry recommend that others come to us for groceries.

Service accomplishments for fiscal 2019 were outstanding. The Greg Gannon Food Pantry served nearly 600 different families over the course of the year. The pantry serves 12 – 17 families daily or approximately 235 different families each month. Families made 3,792 visits to the pantry, and each bag of groceries they received cost about $70 retail. Thus, the Greg Gannon Food Pantry provided over $265,000 worth of food to our community and impacted approximately 50,000 meals. We have seen a 6% increase in visits to our food pantry since 2017. We are very proud of our service accomplishments for fiscal 2019. The Greg Gannon Food Pantry served nearly 600 different families over the course of the year. The pantry serves 12 – 17 families daily or approximately 235 different families each month. Families made 3,792 visits to the pantry, and each bag of groceries they received cost about $70 retail. Thus, the Greg Gannon Food Pantry provided over $265,000 worth of food to our community and impacted approximately 50,000 meals. We have seen a 6% increase in visits to our food pantry since 2017. The Day Program for Men Experiencing Homelessness has seen a steady increase in participation and programs over the past five years. Each day 50 - 70 men came to the Center each day in fiscal 2019 for one or more of the many services provided. Over the course of the year 1,283 unique individuals made 15,546 visits to The Father McKenna Center. We served over 13,000 meals to these guests. On average 14 men were able to take a shower each day for a total of 3,418 showers. Our laundry services washed on average 77 loads of laundry each month, for over 990 loads of laundry in the year. Case management is the most important work done in this program. The case management team held over 2,000 consultation over the 2019 fiscal year. This includes 379 intake consultations for men who are new to our program. The case manages made over 1,200 referrals, including 172 referrals for mental health or addictions rehabilitation services. IDs were obtained by 54 of our guests giving them access to additional services in the District of Columbia. Additional support for men who face homelessness is provided in our daily support group meetings, bi-monthly Peace Building Assemblies, Restorative Justice Circles, Spirituality/Faith Sharing group and weekly Peace Circles. On a regular basis the Director of Services facilitates a Recidivism Prevention Workshop. The Hypothermia/Transition Program is designed to support men who have successfully worked the Better Life Pyramid program and are nearly ready to transition to a life that is independent and stable. In fiscal 2019 24 men participated in the program and 18 of them (75%) reached one or more of their goals. This is an outstanding result for this population.

Financials

FATHER MCKENNA CENTER INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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FATHER MCKENNA CENTER INC

Board of directors
as of 5/1/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Gerry Nolan

H&B Products

Term: 2015 - 2019


Board co-chair

Mr. Jerry O'Neill

Retired

Term: 2015 -

Kevin Curtin

Self-employed Attorney

Lisa Ryan

Self-employed Attorney

Rev. David Baba

Holy Redeemer Parish

Geoffrey Brown

Ed-Ops

Sr. Seton Cunneen, SND

Retired Educator

William Douglass

US Department of State

Mary Forde

Retired CPA/Attorney

Gary Grandchamp

John J. Kirlin, LLC

Walter Hill

US Import/Export Bank

Harry Kettmer

Kettmer Associates

Rev. Gaspar LoBiondo, SJ

Gonzaga Jesuit Community

Maureen McCarty

Self-employed

Joyce Montemayor

Gelman, Rosenberg, & Freedman

Michael Onufrychuk

Fidelity Bank Mortgage Co.

Rev. Stephen Planning

Gonzaga College High School

Peggy Still

Self-employed

Paul Warren

Warren Publishing

Fred Zimmerman

US Department of Veteran Affairs

Kelsey Zimmerman

Mitre Corp.

Keywords

Assistance to the Poor and Homeless