Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and Grantmaking

Generations For Peace Inc

Pass it on!

aka Generations For Peace   |   Washington, DC   |  www.gfp.ngo

Mission

To empower youth to lead and cascade sustainable change in communities experiencing conflict, through world-class free education in conflict transformation and the use of sport, art, advocacy, dialogue, and empowerment for peacebuilding.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder and Chairman

HRH Prince Feisal Bin Hussein

Main address

1800 Massachusetts Ave NW #401

Washington, DC 20036 USA

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EIN

46-1577158

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Public Foundations (T30)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (V05)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Reducing conflict and violence at grassroots in communities in diverse conflict contexts, by promoting youth leadership, community empowerment, active tolerance, and responsible citizenship, to transform conflict, strengthen resilience and social cohesion and reduce vulnerability.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sport for Peace

Sport For Peace is Generations For Peace’s original, flagship peacebuilding tool, first implemented when the organization was founded in 2007. Using specifically designed sports-based games and activities that integrate peer-group and peacebuilding education, Sport For Peace promotes a sense of understanding and unity that transcends the divides found in typical day-to-day life in conflict communities. Sport For Peace has an important role to play in providing a space for opposing groups to meet each other in a neutral location, a “safe space,” with pre-defined rules and set codes of behavior. It allows social contact between communities in which relationships have been severed through war and other forms of destructive conflict, helping children and youth overcome negative images and stereotypes about those who have different abilities, religions, and backgrounds to build acceptance and tolerance. With the aim of reshaping prejudices, expectations, and attitudes, Sport For Peace programs are uniquely designed to fit the context and culture of the local communities in which they are implemented. Key outcomes of Sport For Peace include building trust and acceptance, developing respect, ensuring inclusion, and encouraging greater cooperation that tears down barriers between groups and replaces them with bridges.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Young Adults (20-25 years)

Art is a universal language that has the ability to overcome some of the most common and divisive barriers. Generations For Peace’s Arts For Peace serves to unite communities experiencing destructive conflict and provide a voice for children, youth and adults who might otherwise lack an outlet. Activities in the arts are broad, leading Generations For Peace to implement projects targeting specific groups facing distinct conflicts. Painting and music, for example, have been found to be effective with children and those suffering from traumatic experiences, while interactive role-play drama is especially effective with youth and adults. Arts For Peace activities help bring to surface many issues of conflict and violence existing in local communities, securing acknowledgement that they are happening, identifying possible responsive actions, and generating collective commitment to actively following through on agreed-upon steps. These programs are effective both for psycho-social healing after violence and trauma, and for building trust, developing respect and ensuring inclusion across previously divided social groups.

Population(s) Served
Young Adults (20-25 years)
Young Adults (20-25 years)

Advocacy is about making something important more widely known – and that is exactly what Generations For Peace’s Advocacy For Peace aims to accomplish. From print, social, and broadcast media to rallies, marches, demonstrations, and special community events, Generations For Peace works to build support amongst different groups for change in a local community, starting at the grassroots. The objectives of Advocacy For Peace are what make it unique. Other advocacy campaigns may be aimed at a variety of objectives – for example, advocating for better food or water. However, Advocacy For Peace campaigns must always aim to transform conflict in the communities in which GFP programs are held, creating awareness of issues of conflict and violence in communities, shifting local perceptions, changing individual attitudes, and influencing overall behavior. Additionally, Advocacy For Peace serves to help raise awareness about GFP and proposed programs, as well as to attract stakeholders, partners and potential volunteers. From the grassroots, it is an important step in educating and recruiting volunteers, connecting with others and communicating a particular cause, and building and maintaining relationships and partnerships.

Population(s) Served
Young Adults (20-25 years)
Adults

Dialogue is a process for creating new understanding and new knowledge – it is about shared learning. As such, Generations For Peace’s Dialogue For Peace facilitates effective intra- and inter-group sessions with older youth and adults, deepening understanding and supporting changes in personal perceptions and relationships. Embracing the principles and practices of “transformative dialogue,” Dialogue For Peace programs create a safe space in which participants can engage in an honest exchange of ideas, all while remaining neutral, non-directive and non-prescriptive. The end goal is not necessarily settlement or complete reconciliation, but rather the very significant step of transformation in conflict interactions between the parties. As the newest addition to the Generations For Peace toolkit, Dialogue For Peace helps participants share their own perspectives and develop a better understanding of themselves and each other. What makes Dialogue For Peace a vehicle of peacebuilding is that verbal exchanges among individuals – though not guided in a pre-determined direction – are aimed at conflict transformation through improved relationships in the community.

Population(s) Served
Young Adults (20-25 years)
Adults

Empowerment revolves around the concept of giving strength and skills to those who might not even realize they have them, and Generations For Peace’s Empowerment For Peace does just that. By creating and putting on activities that build the life skills and capacities of youth and adults who are trapped in conflict due to lack of power, influence, economic status, or specific vulnerabilities, these programs equip participants with what they need to break cycles of conflict in their daily lives. Empowerment For Peace is first and foremost a vehicle for peacebuilding, meaning that any activities must contribute to a peacebuilding objective. These activities can include education, vocational training, or income-generating techniques that are combined with conflict transformation education to reinforce personal responsibility, individual capability, and group cooperation. Situations addressed by the programs include gender inequality, domestic violence, gang crime or violence as a means of earning money or protection. Working both from the grassroots and through partnerships with local organizations, Empowerment For Peace provides participants with the appropriate technical capacity-building inputs and secure viable economic opportunities while engaging them with the opportunity to build connections between otherwise divided groups, prompting support for long-term peacebuilding activities.

Population(s) Served
Young Adults (20-25 years)
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Top 100 NGOs 2013

Global Journal

Top 500 NGOS 2014

Global Journal

Top Ranked Organization 2015

Global Giving UK

Superstar Organization 2015

Global Giving UK

Vetted Organization 2015

Global Giving UK

Number 35 NGO in the World 2016

NGO Advisor

Number 34 NGO in the World 2017

NGO Advisor

Number 30 NGO in the World 2018

NGO Advisor

Number 29 NGO in the World 2019

NGO Advisor

Global Impact Award Shortlister 2018

Beyond Sport

Global Awards Shortlister 2019

Beyond Sport

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Score in annual McKinsey Organizational Capacity Assessment for calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The maximum possible score is 4.0. The annual assessment is used to guide organizational capacity development priorities. See http://mckinseyonsociety.com/ocat/

Total number of beneficiaries impacted by programs as of end of calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Adults,Young Adults (20-25 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

By end of 2019, GFP had impacted 740,207 lives. 96.4% of participants completed the full number of GFP behavior-change activity sessions totaling an average of 44.1 hours of quality contact time each.

Total number of research publications published during calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

General/Unspecified

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, GFP produced 26 research publications published on GFP platforms and 77 internal learning documents for capacity/process improvement.

Total number of people reached by our communications during calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Adults,Young Adults (20-25 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2019, GFP reached nearly 9 million people through its social media activities.

Total funds secured (on accruals basis) for activities in calendar year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Adults,Young Adults (20-25 years)

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Adults,Young Adults (20-25 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Adults,Young Adults (20-25 years)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

Dedicated to sustainable conflict transformation at the grassroots, Generations For Peace empowers volunteer leaders of youth to promote active tolerance and responsible citizenship in communities experiencing different forms of conflict and violence. We are a volunteer movement, empowering, mentoring and supporting volunteers to be change-makers to create a better future in their own communities.

Generations For Peace has created a unique curriculum designed to empower our volunteers with practical knowledge and skills to apply peacebuilding theory to situations of destructive conflict in their communities. It equips them to organize activities for children, work with youth and adults, train other volunteers and gather support by building and strengthening community networks and partnerships. Our mentoring model provides support to our volunteers in every step of their engagement with GFP, and helps build their confidence when engaged in the challenging contexts of their home communities. Our cascading model increases reach and reinforces the sustainability of our volunteers’ own peacebuilding efforts, whilst responding to local needs and building on local assets, knowledge, and strengths. It also ensures that the number of volunteers implementing GFP programs continues to grow exponentially, bringing the hope of lasting peace to more generations in communities around the world. VOLUNTEER SELECTION Volunteer youth leaders from around the world go through a rigorous process to be selected as Delegates to attend a GFP camp or a GFP local training. To become a GFP Delegate, volunteers are expected to meet strict selection criteria, including leadership potential and determination to lead change to achieve lasting impact; conflict sensitivity and commitment to GFP values; a strong network and community-oriented experience; and the capacity to attract support, to train, motivate and mentor others, to implement high-quality activities, and to learn and adapt. TRAININGS: PASSING ON OUR VALUES, KNOWLEDGE, AND SKILLS TO DELEGATES Our trainings provide Delegates with knowledge in peacebuilding and conflict transformation, equipping them with the skills needed to carry out GFP programs in their own communities. CURRICULUM Our world-class curriculum provides volunteers with practical knowledge and skills to apply peacebuilding theory to situations of destructive conflict in their communities. The curriculum also includes working with children, youth and adults, training other volunteers, and gathering support by building and strengthening community networks and partnerships. The curriculum includes: • Theory of peacebuilding and conflict transformation • Core and advanced-level conflict analysis • Skills and techniques for facilitating learning by different age groups • Behavioral change, and the use of sport, art, advocacy, dialogue and empowerment activities for change in communities • Program design, monitoring and evaluation of impact and sustainability The curriculum is developed and updated regularly in response to feedback from our volunteers and the latest research and innovation from our GFP Institute. It is available in several languages and continues to be translated into others so volunteers can deliver training in their native tongue.

Generations For Peace is a global movement of trained volunteers in 51 countries and territories, supported by a dedicated Headquarters staff and by the Generations For Peace Institute. Partnerships are critical for our reach and sustainability, and we have proven are capacity to establish and nurture effective partnerships at all levels. Our Partners include governmental donors, non-governmental donors, Olympic Movement partners, United Nations agencies, leading commercial partners, and local community-based organizations and NGOs. Our unique Curriculum has evolved over time based on our program experience and research, and the evolving needs of our volunteers as their programs mature and grow. Uniquely, Generations For Peace has developed a peacebuilding toolkit that contains five Peacebuilding Tools: Sport, Art, Advocacy, Dialogue and Empowerment: We use sport as an entry point to engage with youth, and our carefully-facilitated sport-based games provide a vehicle for integrated education and behavior change. Our strong connections with the Olympic Movement, notably the International Olympic Committee (IOC), Jordan Olympic Committee (JOC) and Olympic Council of Asia (OCA), give us access to excellent networks and partners. In addition to our sport-based approaches, we have also developed art, advocacy, dialogue, and empowerment activities to support conflict transformation with children, youth, and adults in different contexts. This mix of approaches provides flexibility, allowing us to engage with different target groups in different contexts to support transformation of conflict and reduction of violence at the grassroots in communities.

We are committed to robust measurement and evaluation of our programs to support our learning and innovation, to identify best practices, and to demonstrate impact and sustainability. Key indicators include: • reductions in different forms of violence • increased capacity to manage conflict in non-violent ways • strengthened ability to break-out of cycles of violence • changes in attitudes and shattering of stereotypes • greater understanding, respect and trust between different tribes, ethnic groups, religions, genders, and minorities • strengthened social capital and social networks; empowerment of girls and women • greater volunteerism, youth engagement, and responsible citizenship. In addition to these programmatic indicators, Generations For Peace also conducts an annual Organizational Capacity Assessment which measures 58 indicators against 7 elements of organizational capacity: • aspirations • strategies • organizational skills • human resources • infrastructure and systems • organizational structure • organizational culture

Since 2007, we have trained and mentored more than 15,600 volunteer leaders of youth in 51 countries in the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe and North America. With our support, their ongoing programs address local issues of conflict and violence, and have touched the lives of more than 740,000 children, youth and adults. Generations For Peace is currently ranked #26 in the "Top 500 NGOs in the World" by NGO Advisor (making us the third-highest-ranked peacebuilding NGO, and the top-ranked Jordanian NGO). Their ranking is based on an assessment of innovation, impact, and sustainability. In simple terms, over the last 13 years we have achieved rapid global growth; we have learned an enormous amount and gone through "proof of concept", developing our approach in different contexts, and demonstrating the success, impact and sustainability of our model. We are now facing growing demand for our programs around the world, and wish to secure more partnerships to build on our success and sustain our continued growth. As well as funding from the governments of the United States and the European Union, we have excellent partnerships with several UN agencies and NGOs, within the Olympic Movement, particularly the Jordan Olympic Committee, and with corporate partners.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is the organization collecting feedback?

    We regularly collect feedback through: sms text surveys, electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys, focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), community meetings/town halls, constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, participatory feedback evaluations/decision-making; reflection/learning activities; research studies.

  • How is the organization using feedback?

    We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve, to strategically identify individuals or entities who would contribute to achieving community goals.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    We share feedback with: the people we serve, our staff, our board, our funders, our community partners, individuals reached through our digital learning platforms.

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to: the people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, it is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, contextual limitations on those we request feedback from, including language and cultural practices.

  • What significant change resulted from feedback

    As a part of its cascading volunteer model, GFP trains individuals from local communities to implement peacebuilding programs, including in school settings. Volunteers are community members, but in some programmes are not always students or staff at those schools. GFP has received feedback in such settings that programming could be more effective if more of the volunteers were students or staff at those schools. In response, GFP has emphasized finding, selecting, and training volunteers from within the schools, and in addition has led GFP to seek more partnerships with government entities with access to school settings. Already, GFP has received positive feedback and seen improved program results, increasing formal partnerships and even expansion of programming within the countries served.

Financials

Generations For Peace Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Generations For Peace Inc

Board of directors
as of 3/18/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

HRH Prince Feisal Bin Hussein

HRH Prince Feisal Bin Hussein

H.E. Mr. Akel Biltaji

Former Mayor of Greater Amman Municipality

H.E. Mr. Samir Murad

Former Jordanian Minister of Labour

H.E. Mrs. Suzanne Afanah

Managing Partner of Advvise

Mr. Nasser Majali

Secretary General to the Olympic Committee

Mr. Ala’ Khalifeh

Managing Partner, Khalifeh & Partners Law Firm

Ms. Deema Bibi

CEO of INJAZ

Deema Bibi

INJAZ

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/18/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

peacebuilding, conflict transformation, youth leadership, community empowerment, tolerance, citizenship; sport, arts, advocacy, dialogue; research, evaluation; innovation, impact, sustainability