ELIJAH RISING

HOUSTON, TX   |  elijahrising.org

Mission

Elijah Rising is ending sex trafficking through prayer, awareness, intervention, and restoration.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Mrs. Micah Gamboa

Main address

2717 N. Sabine St

HOUSTON, TX 77009 USA

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EIN

46-1885871

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Christian (X20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Sex trafficking is a booming industry that occurs when someone uses force, fraud, or coercion to cause a commercial sex act with an adult or causes a minor to commit a commercial sex act according to the Department of Homeland Security. A commercial sex act as defined by the Department of Justice is prostitution, pornography, and sexual performance done in exchange for any item of value, such as money, drugs, shelter, food, or clothes. The sex trafficking industry thrives because there’s ever-increasing demand and based on simple economic principles, where there is demand, supply grows to meet it. The consumer in the triadic equation between the buyer, seller, and the supply fuels the market with financial resources. Anywhere there are large pools of money available to be spent; trafficking is sure to follow. Which makes Houston known throughout the country as a significant hub for sex trafficking.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Awareness Van Tours

Designed to be training on wheels, we tour different areas of Houston to bring awareness to the prevalence of human trafficking.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Located in our main office, we document and showcase the history of commercial sexual exploitation and give our audience the opportunity to see the realities of trafficking through the eyes of victims and survivors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We train, equip, and empower volunteers to reach out to the individuals trapped in the sex industry with opportunities for hope. Equipped with a local hotline number, volunteers, along with trained team leaders, go into Asian massage parlors, Latin American cantinas, strip clubs, street tracks, and online websites to meet survivors in their place of need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Founded in 2015, the Elijah Rising Restorative Care Campus was created to meet the needs of survivors who exited the sex industry. It is an 84-acre aftercare community for adult female survivors, and eventually, their children, to live, heal, work, and restore the lives that were stolen from them.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adults

Related Program

Intervention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our ability to engage with our demographic was severely limited due to the on going Covid-19 pandemic. We have since rebounded and developed safe opportunities to engage with our target demographic.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Our public events dramatically shifted due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Most of these events shifted to an online platform like Zoom.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Due to the gravity of the Covid-19 Pandemic our speaking engagements and training events were dramatically reduced after March 2020.

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Awareness Van Tours

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of free participants of guided tours

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Awareness Van Tours

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, we paused our Van Tours starting at the beginning of March 2020. We have not relaunched our Van Tours feature yet.

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We removed all inactive email addresses.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total Nights of Restorative Care Safe Housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Restorative Care Campus

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal 1: Elijah Rising will be recognized as the foremost local authority for addressing sex trafficking and methodology for making successful impacts for reduction and elimination.
Elijah Rising serves as stewards of the knowledge that is continually being developed and disseminated by a broad range of agencies, including other non-profits. We listen and learn from our community and we exist to serve the needs of that community by continually developing the language necessary to appropriately and effectively communicate the realities of sex trafficking as well as best practices for combating the issues effectively and efficiently. We do so through hosting various teachings and seminars and e-classes (coming soon) as well as our van tours that train 700 - 1000 people each year.

Goal 2: Foster a learning community in which staff, volunteers, partners, visitors, and stakeholders share insights across multiple disciplines and use that learning to increase the impact of anti-trafficking efforts.
In conjunction with Goal 1, Elijah Rising focuses its non-financial resources to create and foster a community of collaboration. We firmly believe the ending of sex trafficking will not come due to any one person’s or one entity’s efforts. It will take a joint endeavor of our society to make a true impact if we want to see an end to sex trafficking.

Goal 3: Help ensure shelter, basic medical care, access to nutritious food, safety, and trauma care is available to survivors of sex trafficking by establishing a restorative care campus with 12-24 months of care by 2019.
Starting in 2015, Elijah Rising saw a great need for providing human services to those exiting the commercial sex industry in the Houston area. At that time there were only a handful of beds designated to survivors of sex trafficking. If an individual were to exit at that time, they would be forced to go into a homeless shelter and domestic violence shelter; both of which are triggering for someone who has experienced the same, if not more, trauma than a combat veteran.

Goal 4: By 2025, have a coordinated, multi-disciplinary, system in place to increase the efficiency of service delivery from program to program within Elijah Rising.
By 2025, our goal is to have a coordinated system that is able to deliver services from start to finish. Currently, our services, while incredibly unique and what makes Elijah Rising who they are, stand firmly on their own. However, we will move to implement systems that will improve the delivery process of those programs to better track the overall success and to ensure the community we aim to serve is receiving the best care possible.

Goal 5: By 2030, see the Elijah Rising program of Prayer, Awareness, Intervention, and Restoration duplicated in another city.
Our goal is to make the Elijah Rising program replicable for others to come along side us and develop branches of Elijah Rising across the nation.

Strategy 1: Maintain Awareness Van Tours
The longest running program in our repertoire is our Awareness Van Tour program. Developed by our Founder, Catherine French, our van tour program is essentially Human Trafficking 101 on wheels. We not only educate the public about the dangers of sex trafficking, but we also show participants exactly where cases of trafficking have either been documented or where a high probability of cases may occur.

Strategy 2: Develop Strategic and Targeted Outreach Efforts
We partner with several other NGOs who can cover the broad spectrum of services necessary for someone to effectively leave the industry. Our city now has a local hotline number, an emergency assessment program, five restorative care programs, soon to be six, a drop-in center, and a number of resources ranging from medical, dental, housing, childcare, and more, all oriented to the needs of survivors. But it's up to use to make the community aware of the resources now available to them.

Strategy 3: Coordinate and Launch Restorative Care Campus
With this program, we will offer a holistic approach to healing trauma victims. We are partnering with Baylor College of Medicine and other organizations that will take care of therapy. We are also partnering with Access Health who will handle medical needs. And we’re partnering with amazing volunteers who will serve as mentors to help with the transition to a new life. Designed for adult, female, survivors of sex trafficking, participants will experience a broad range of services ranging from therapy and counseling to learning financial stewardship and leadership skills development.

Strategy 4: Open the Elijah Rising Store
In conjunction with the campus, we felt the need to provide opportunities for learned job skills. With this in mind, we developed a Social Enterprise Program that will serve the needs of the community by creating opportunities to learn viable job skills and earn a decent wage, all while matriculating through our restoration program. Now, we are given the chance to participate in one of Houston’s longest-running neighborhoods known for shopping and eating. And what’s even more exciting, is its right down the street from one of our longest running partners, A 2nd Cup. A 2nd Cup is a non-profit coffee shop that supports other NGOs with its profits. It also, just recently, launched A Brazen Table that teaches survivors the ins and outs of being a restaurateur!

We are one of Houston’s oldest anti-trafficking organizations. We have developed a reputation amongst our peers and the abolitionist movement across the country to where even visitors from out of state stop by because of the work we are able to accomplish. Our staff is some of the most well-versed individuals and has close to 50 years experience between the five of them.

We employ targeted volunteer tactics to accomplish our mission of ending sex trafficking. This allows for us to curb large financial expenses. We also do all fundraising in house. We do not hire outside fundraising help so that our resources can go towards the mission.

We rely on private donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations. This allows for the maximum flexibility within our organization. If we need to shift gears at a moment’s notice, our financial resources will not be tied up in government regulations.

We have been able to do so much in the past 7 years. Blessings and testimonies are beyond compare. We have been able to establish a successful awareness program that has accounted for thousands of individual being awoken to the realities of sex trafficking.

We have established successful outreach methods that have since gone on to train other nonprofits on how to reach women trapped in the industry. We even hosted an outreach conference during the Super Bowl in 2016 because it was held in Houston. To our best knowledge, it was a one-of-a-kind event that has since spurred on other cities to do the same. Even to this day, we still receive calls in January asking how we managed to pull it off.

Another major accomplishment is the purchase of our 84-acre campus. We were a five-year-old organization at the time; a newborn in comparison to other longer-running nonprofits. But by God’s grace, we were able to pull it off and now it’s being turned into a serene, therapeutic environment.

The story aforementioned of how we acquired the property is not one we will forget nor will we ever stop telling. Now that it’s finally reaching its first phase of potential, we know more and more testimonies will be birthed from the daily interactions of our students and we will continue to grow and provide more housing and resources to survivors.

In 2019, we are restructuring everything. Because of our new office space in central Houston and because of additional financial resources, we are redesigning our approach to prayer, awareness, intervention, and restoration. 2019 will be a launch year on a scale yet unknown to us.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve women who have been victims of commercial sexual exploitation.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ELIJAH RISING
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ELIJAH RISING

Board of directors
as of 6/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Jennifer Hohman

CIO & VP, Seadrill

Term: 2021 - 2023

Audrey Manito

Michael P. Fleming & Associates

Aaron Pichon

The Kingsland Group

Kerry Stovall

Tami Preece

Blazek & Vetterling

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/16/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/17/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.