Global Pediatric Alliance

Working to reduce maternal and newborn deaths and improve the quality of life for women and children in Latin America

SAN FRANCISCO, CA   |  www.globalpediatricalliance.org

Mission

Global Pediatric Alliance seeks to promote grassroots empowerment and improve child and maternal health by providing educational, technical, and financial support for community-based health projects in Latin America. We train community health workers and midwives, and provide financial support to small organizations and community groups in marginalized areas, using approaches known to have a significant impact on maternal and child mortality, including clean water and child malnutrition alleviation projects.

Ruling year info

2013

Executive Director

Stacey Ramirez

Main address

PO BOX 640046

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94164 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-2277766

NTEE code info

Public Health Program (E70)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Mexico's southern state of Chiapas, where two-thirds of the population is indigenous, approximately 80% of the population suffers from extreme poverty, resulting in poor health and unstable living conditions, disproportionately affecting women and girls. In Guatemala, one of the poorest countries in Latin America, the burdens of poverty fall most heavily on its rural indigenous communities, where the infant mortality rate is 30% higher than among non-indigenous children. In poor regions, where access to state health services is limited, traditional midwives, or birth attendants (TBAs), often provide initial and essential maternal and child health care. In many of the communities where we work, at least 80% of births take place at home with assistance of TBAs.

Local community health workers also provide valuable health services to thousands of families that live in these rural, hard to reach areas and provide a grassroots, low-cost solution.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Midwife Training Program

In poor regions, where access to state health services is limited, traditional midwives, or birth attendants (TBAs), often provide initial and essential maternal and child health care. In many of the communities where we work, at least 80% of births take place at home with assistance of TBAs. We support these important practitioners by offering workshops in evidence-based pediatric primary care, prenatal care, birth techniques and management, the recognition of risk factors and danger signs, and the integration of traditional medicine.

Population(s) Served

Many communities understand that poor health is often caused or exacerbated by poverty, racism, environmental degradation, and other factors, and they have both the motivation and knowledge to devise their own integrated solutions to child and maternal health problems. What they lack is financial support or technical expertise. Our Small Grants program meets this need by providing funding for well-conceived, sustainable, grassroots health projects.



Our program goes beyond grantmaking. We are committed to building long-term partnerships with communities committed to quality child and maternal health, who recognize the essential link between individual health and community well-being and prosperity, and have the capacity to be agents of change. Through regular communication and site visits, we deepen our knowledge of the history, challenges, and successes of each community. Our goal is to help grassroots leaders expand their skills, generate new ideas, and turn the best ideas into future projects.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

GPA's mission is to reduce preventable maternal and child death and improve the quality of life for women and children in Latin America through empowering grassroots communities. We do this by training health promoters and midwives and providing financial and technical support to small organizations and community groups. Since our inception, GPA has provided workshops in pediatric medicine, emergency care, and reproductive health to hundreds of doctors, nurses, primary health care providers and lay midwives in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Ecuador and Mexico. Many of the areas where we work lack access to any other type of health or financial resources.

An underlying goal of GPA's program work is to build self-sufficiency among local health care staff and members of the communities themselves.

Global Pediatric Alliance (GPA) works in partnership with communities to empower traditional indigenous midwives and community health workers because they are often the only link to essential maternal and child health services in some of the poorest regions in Mexico and Guatemala. We do this through our Midwife Training Program by offering workshops in evidence-based pediatric primary care, prenatal care, birth techniques and management, the recognition of risk factors and danger signs, and the integration of traditional medicine. We also strengthen the skills of Community Health Workers by supporting the training of community health promoters in first aid, prenatal care, obstetric emergencies, respiratory and diarrheal diseases, as well as in the coordination of an emergency transportation fund. Each year, GPA also funds health-related projects designed by grassroots communities, which have the potential for long-term impact and sustainability. Projects range from infrastructure to educational workshops. Recent examples include chlorination of a municipal water system serving 4,800 families in Chimaltenango, Guatemala, installation of clean water tanks at rural health clinics, and reproductive health and family planning education for indigenous girls and adolescents.

An underlying goal of GPA's program work is to build self-sufficiency among local health care staff and members of the communities themselves. Over the past five years we have successfully trained 13 different groups of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) in rural, indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico, helping several of them establish self-governed associations, and fostering the establishment of a statewide Midwife Network. Through our Small Grants program, we have supported 28 community-driven health projects, designed by grassroots groups using approaches known to have a significant impact on maternal and child mortality, including clean water projects and health promoter training.

Global Pediatric Alliance (GPA) was founded in 2002 by pediatrician Scott Cohen in the belief that educating lay health workers could improve child and maternal health in poor, rural areas. We do this by training health promoters and midwives and providing financial support to small organizations and community groups. Since our inception, GPA has provided workshops in evidence-based pediatric medicine, emergency care, and reproductive health to hundreds of doctors, nurses, primary health care providers and lay midwives in Guatemala, Nicaragua, Ecuador and Mexico. Many of the areas where we work lack access to any other type of health or financial resources.

The Board of Directors is comprised of medical and public health who are responsible for maintaining GPA's strategic vision and who also provide volunteer hours to guide GPA's health training program. The GPA staff is made up of professionals with ample experience in implementing health and educational projects in indigenous communities, with some staff members and trainers from these communities themselves. We employ professional midwife trainers who have medical experience working in hospitals and maternal waiting homes and who received certification as Skilled Birth Attendants (a higher level of medical practice), many of whom are fluent in Tzotzil and Tzeltal, and who have been working with GPA over the past years.

To date, GPA has trained approximately 1400 traditional midwives and health promoters on comprehensive prenatal care, obstetric and newborn emergencies and postpartum care in Guatemala, Mexico, Ecuador and Nicaragua.

Approximately 1400 midwives, health auxiliaries and health promoters trained and supported in GPA's evidence-based curriculum for prenatal care, delivery, postpartum and newborn care.

Over the past five years, more than 225 midwives have been trained to recognize and respond to obstetric emergencies and newborn emergencies both at the community level with the GPA evidence-based curriculum and in a clinic setting.

A state network of midwives has been established in Chiapas, Mexico to provide a platform for midwives to receive skills trainings, interact with health directors, establish links with health institutions, influence public policy and promote their officially recognized integration into the continuum of care for expecting mothers and newborns.

Key Health institution staff trained in providing culturally appropriate and respectful prenatal, delivery and postpartum, and newborn care at the Hospital de la Mujer in Chiapas, Mexico

152 chlorination systems have been installed in 145 Guatemalan communities, and 60 household rainwater catchment systems in Ecuador, bringing clean water to approximately 75,000 community members.

30 rural communities have created community emergency funds in the past 2 years, benefitting more than 8,500 people, and helping save the lives of women suffering obstetric emergencies.

GPA has supported more than 25 community-driven health projects for innovative projects to address urgent health needs, such as clean water, sanitation, health clinics, severe malnutrition, and emergency response crews.

GPA helped indigenous midwives in Chiapas, Mexico establish their own legally recognized civil association “Tzoblej Chihchil Nich Romero, A.C." The association is self-governed and is the first in the region to give community midwives a collective voice to increase their recognition and gain better access to services for their clients.

Financials

Global Pediatric Alliance
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Global Pediatric Alliance

Board of directors
as of 1/15/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kate Kentfield-Kessner