REJUVENATING WOMEN

ToGETher Freedom

aka Restored Wings Recovery Program   |   Boys Town, NE   |  http://www.rejuvenatingwomen.com

Mission

Providing hope and restoration to survivors of human trafficking.

Ruling year info

2014

Chief Executive Officer & Founder

Mrs. Julie A. Shrader

Main address

Po Box 207

Boys Town, NE 68010 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Julie Shrader

EIN

46-2322306

NTEE code info

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Group Home, Residential Treatment Facility - Mental Health Related (F33)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The International Labour Organization estimates that there are more than 20.9 million victims of human trafficking worldwide. Human trafficking can take many forms, including forced labor, sexual slavery, and exploitation, as well as other forms of exploitation that have severe impacts on the victims of these crimes as well as the communities where these crimes occur, oftentimes in obscurity. Locally, human trafficking is an issue of growing concern. Data collected from the report “Nebraska’s Commercial Sex Market” sheds light on the prevalence of the commercial sex trade and related trafficking activity within the state. Data show that a total of 900 individuals are sold for sex, many often multiple times, each month in Nebraska, and more than two-thirds (675) of these illicit transactions monthly occur in Omaha, Nebraska. (Women’s Fund of Omaha, 2016).

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Restored Wings Program

The Rejuvenating Women Restored Wings Recovery Program was created to provide a home and a family atmosphere for victims and survivors of human trafficking. It is a safe and compassionate environment where women who have suffered sexual exploitation and trafficking can begin to heal.

The Restored Wings Home is a beautiful 5,500 square foot refuge that offers a warm and loving environment that the women call their home. Our passion is to help every woman find love, healing, joy and peace by choosing to work through her pain with our multidisciplinary support team provided to those in our program and receiving services.

The Restored Wings Home is the first and only of its kind in the state of Nebraska. We are the only faith-based home with both a short and long-term therapeutic treatment program specifically created only for survivors of human trafficking and exploitation. We allow our survivors to stay for up to two years and provide them in-depth counseling, case management, free tattoo branding removal and cover-up, and free legal services. We understand that each woman is in a different place in her healing, thus, we individualize treatment to give her the best care possible. We also focus on education, job training, career strengths and aim to teach her the much-needed life skills so that she can thrive and live independently.

PROGRAMS AND SERVICES WE OFFER:

Tier 1, Short-Term Housing – We offer a multitude of services including case management for our new short-term transitional housing assistance for up to 90-days.

Tier 2, Long-Term Housing – Residential therapeutic program includes, but is not limited to individual and group therapy, case management, mentorship, legal services, tattoo branding removal, equine therapy, occupational therapy services, life-skills classes, and receive comprehensive medical care. This tier requires a commitment to the program for 18-24 months.

Mentoring Program – One to one mentorship program that includes an individualized healthy relationship-building approach.

Virtual Case Consultation – Created during the COVID-19 crisis. Case consultation is done virtually for those unable to physically attend or enter the RW program.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Sex workers

Where we work

Awards

Publisher's Choice Award 2017

Metro Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

Member of Omaha Chamber of Commerce 2020

Nonprofit Association of the Midlands 2020

West O Chamber 2020

Sarpy Chamber 2020

CenterSphere 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations, Social and economic status, Religious groups, Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of therapy hours provided to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations, Sexual identity

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of support group services offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations, Ethnic and racial groups, Health

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations, Age groups

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of program participants who remain employed 12 months after program completion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Work status and occupations, Age groups

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of legal assistance offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Work status and occupations, Family relationships

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Social and economic status, Work status and occupations, Family relationships

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of employment placements defined as part-time (less than 35 hours per week)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Restored Wings Program

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Restored Wings Residential Program, offers survivors a residence where they can safely continue their treatment and transition back into society. The four-bedroom home that sleeps 10 – the location of which is known only to caregivers and the women who rescue these women is staffed and fully designed to provide peace, safety and healing for the women as they make the difficult transition towards independence.

The home is open to women ages 19 and older who are survivors of human trafficking. During their residential experience, the women survivors do not pay rent however, the program does mandate that the women attend school once they have received medical clearance from their counselor. RW’s program utilizes the Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Model, which is specifically adapted or survivors of human trafficking. It works closely with several other agencies and seeks to adopt best practices when consistent with RW’s mission and the specific needs of its clientele.

Types of Programs and Services we offer:
Tier 1, Short-Term Housing – We offer a multitude of services including case management for our new short-term transitional housing assistance for up to 90-days.

Tier 2, Long-Term Housing – Residential therapeutic program includes, but is not limited to individual and group therapy, case management, mentorship, legal services, tattoo branding removal, equine therapy, occupational therapy services, life-skills classes, and receive comprehensive medical care. This tier requires a commitment to the program for 18-24 months.

Mentoring Program – One to one mentorship program that includes an individualized healthy relationship-building approach.

Virtual Case Consultation – Created during the COVID-19 crisis. Case Consultation is done virtually for those unable to physically attend the RW program.

As the only faith-based organization locally that is exclusively dedicated to combatting human trafficking, Rejuvenating Women offers the women it serves a comprehensive array of services to help them achieve freedom from the bonds of trafficking and lead healthy and independent lives. These services include intensive, personalized one to one and as well as group counseling to address complex trauma, EMDR, substance abuse issues, legal services, mentoring, tattoo branding removal, equine therapy, life skills, and individual case management.

In 2017, to further expand its support for its clients, Rejuvenating Women opened Nebraska's first and only restoration house for trafficking survivors, Restored Wings Home and Program. The residential home is where they can safely continue their treatment and transition back into society.

Recognizing that trafficking is a modern form of slavery, RW provides women freedom from the bonds of this slavery by having onsite staff who are qualified and experienced trauma therapists, round-the-clock care by Resident Assistants and having trauma-informed policies.

Its model promotes five pillars of freedom for its clients, including 1) physical freedom, 2) mental freedom, 3) emotional freedom, (4) economic freedom; and (5) life skills (which are often necessary for ensuring the women have the freedom to function independently in society). RW’s approach combines the best in evidence-based counseling and therapy with compassion driven through its faith-based background. It should be noted that while RW serves because of its faith, it does not require its clients to adopt its beliefs. RW serves all women in need of its services, indiscriminately.

Making our voices heard and speaking on behalf of the victims and survivors we serve and to help toughen the laws in Nebraska .

For the most recently completed 2017 program year, the residents were served by Rejuvenating Women's Restored Wings residential program.
For a large number of participants served by RW during this past year (through the residential and non-residential program) approximately half have achieved some level of success, as well as a large number of them, are currently leading healthy lives, defined as free from trafficking and include gainful employment or pursuit of an education. It should also be mentioned that while RW has identified several varying indicators to define “success,” there are additional clients or “completers” who are free from trafficking, which is in itself a small milestone on the way to independent and healthy living.

We hope to help four times the amount of survivors this year while having life-changing graduations for each woman who enters our door.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have added a short-term residential program (under 90-days), Mentoring Program, and Virtual Case Consultation to serve more victims and survivors. We now offer both short and long-term programming.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

REJUVENATING WOMEN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

REJUVENATING WOMEN

Board of directors
as of 5/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Connie Bissen

Rejuvenating Women

Term: 2021 - 2023

Connie Bissen

Lifegate Church

Crystal Booker

Ameritas

Lius Fortune

Strategic Alliance

Kraig Williams

Great Western Bank

Derek Oden

Campaign Manager, Charles Herbster

Karen Bowling

Nebraska Family Alliance

Julie Shrader

Rejuvenating Women, CEO

Scott Garner

Verizon Media

Jessica Maas

Operation Underground Railroad

Chris Allende

Network and Outreach Coordinator at Wellbeing Initiative

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/23/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.