Think Wild

Bend, OR   |  www.thinkwildco.org

Mission

Inspiring the High Desert community to care for and protect native wildlife through education, conservation and rescue/rehabilitation.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Sally Compton

Main address

62410 Erickson Rd

Bend, OR 97701 USA

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Formerly known as

HIGH DESERT WILDLIFE RESCUE AND REHABILITATION

EIN

46-2360867

NTEE code info

(Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge) (D34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Hospital

A Wildlife Hospital to treat and rehabilitate native wildlife - providing care for patients who have been injured or orphaned so they can be released back into the wild.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

​Think Wild seeks to reduce the incidents of human/wildlife conflict between humans and wildlife through prevention education. When conflicts do occur, Think Wild provides veterinary treatment and care at its Erickson Road hospital currently underway, and designed to minimize treatment and recovery stress.

The following are the high level goals in support of our strategic plan:
1. Develop Fundraising initiatives and programs (including both donors and grantors) with
annual targets
2. Complete Founder’s Circle - $325K matching - by end of 2020.
3. Transition Board to fundraising, build Advisory Board, implement board assessment and
Board policies
4. Continue to execute on the Communications/Outreach program for building “Think WIld”
ethos in CO community.
5. Organize, plan and continue to develop the Think Wild website to provide improvements
to animal care and welfare and to create educational opportunities for the public
6. Establish a volunteer corp of 20 regular “go to” volunteers in Fundraising, events,
education, hotline and wildlife support
7. To have two core (year round) K-12 Educational Service partners and developing core
relationships 5 other schools.
8. Develop, and maintain an Animal Care policy with input from credentialed experts in the
animal care and wildlife field.
9. Build strong partnerships with complementary organizations (ex. OSU-cascades, CO
Landwatch, ONDA, City of Bend)
10. Develop service lines for revenue sources (ex. Conservation services)

Think Wild has a dedicated board, two full-time staff members, passionated and skilled volunteers and an engaged and involved community of stakeholders.

Think Wild currently provides:
• Wildlife Hospital- rescue and rehabilitation of injured/orphaned wildlife
• Wildlife Hotline and Transport- (in collaboration with licensed rehabilitators)
• Think Wild Education- programming for local schools and organizations
• Community Outreach- awareness and resources on ways to reduce wildlife conflict
• Conservation Services- supporting beaver on our Oregon High Desert landscape

Build wildlife hospital and established wildlife hotline.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Members of the Central Oregon community by applying what we have learned from years of wildlife care to inform the community on man-made hazards in our growing, urban landscape, and advising on local and regional policies to reduce threats to wildlife. Teaching and inspiring the public to live respectfully with urban wildlife – responding to thousands of annual inquiries regarding orphaned or injured wildlife, and offering Think Wild Education, including online resources.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Implementing a program of more consistent communication with our volunteer team.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed us to see how our community interacts with our local wildlife, what questions they have, and how we can empower them to best support wildlife in their daily lives.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Think Wild
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Think Wild

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Jaime Thurk

Reese Mercer

Jennifer Lair

James MacAfee

Caroline Read

Kody Osborne

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data