AYA YOUTH COLLECTIVE

Relationships. Resources. Housing.

aka 3:11 Youth Housing, Grand Rapids HQ   |   Grand Rapids, MI   |  www.ayayouth.org

Mission

We create communities, rooted in belonging, for youth experiencing instability to own their future.

Ruling year info

2014

C.E.O.

Lauren VanKeulen

Main address

320 State St. SE

Grand Rapids, MI 49503 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

3:11 Youth Housing

Grand Rapids HQ

EIN

46-2391112

NTEE code info

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

2,000 young people between the ages of 14 and 24 experience homelessness each year in Kent County. The primary factors for causes of youth homelessness are family dysfunction, sexual abuse, aging out of foster care, juvenile system involvement, and economic hardship. In addition, as a result of these factors, many youth have experienced trauma, poor attachment, and other significant difficulties before becoming homeless, leading to a variety of barriers and challenges. While former foster youth comprise some of the homeless youth population, other youth have become homeless due to severe abuse and neglect. Recent studies have found that 30% of unaccompanied homeless youth were abused sexually and 50% were abused physically. Additionally, 40% percent of homeless youth identify as LGBTQ. If unaccompanied youth are not afforded a continuum of safe housing options they are at increased risk for a variety of detrimental, long-term outcomes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing

We house youth between the ages of 18 and 24 and walk alongside them as they transition to healthy interdependence.

Population(s) Served

Drop-in is a resource for youth ages 14-24 experiencing housing crisis, homelessness, or who just need basic resources, people to love and accept them as they are, and a place to belong.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of housing units built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We envision a community where every youth in crisis has access to housing and resources to facilitate their thriving, disrupting cycles of poverty, and serving as a gold standard for youth engagement.
5 Year Targets:
1. $4M Raised per year
2. 100 Housing Units Accessed
3. 700 Members at Drop-in
4. 80% of youth in housing attaining Long Term Stability
5. 350 Youth attain Thriving

Three Uniques in how we work with youth:
1. Our flexibility in working with Youth: mentors and advocates encourage youth to bring their full selves and walk alongside youth in obtaining their goals.
2. Walking along side youth to be able to choose for themselves what they need. We offer five main program areas: Vital Docs, Health and Wellness, Employment, Education, Transportation + Housing (18-24-year olds only)
3. There is no “Finished”, we stay with youth as long as they need

Our Proven Process:
1. Intake/Assess
2. Establish relationships
3. Access to Resources
4. Stability for your future

Our Guarantee to Youth: You are the “author of your story”, we will treat you with dignity and respect and provide
you with spaces to belong.

3:11 Youth Housing and Grand Rapids HQ have come together to form A.Y.A. Youth Collective, an organization providing circles of support for youth facing homelessness. Housing insecurity is complex, and we have partnered for years to address its many dimensions. As a unified organization, we have the capacity to create a more connective, cohesive experience for young people on their journey toward housing and stability.

A.Y.A. stands for As You Are, and it is a commitment that every youth will find resources and authentic relationships, As You Are. Building relationships, identifying valuable resources, and finding safety come from being accepted and celebrated as you are. The Youth Collective portion of our name highlights how we center youth voices in our mission. We work with youth, and community partners, to break cycles of homelessness. It takes a collective effort, and we want you to be a part of the Youth Collective too!

50+ YOUTH HOUSED
Since 2012, we have housed over 40 youth. Currently we can house 22 youth, and 4 kiddos at a time in our transitional housing resource.

STABLE HOUSING
90% of youth in our transitional housing resource find safe and stable housing of their own or reunite with family.

SAVED OVER $10,000
Collectively, our youth have saved over $10,000 for future housing through their rental savings accounts.

YOUTH ENGAGEMENT
100% of youth in our transitional housing resource are engaged in community meals, learning valuable life skills and conflict resolution.

GOAL SETTING
100% of youth in our transitional housing resource are engaged in goal setting, tracking their progress as they move towards healthy interdependence.

EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT
90% of youth in housing have obtained full-time employment, entered and completed trade school, and/or pursued higher education.

UNIQUE MEMBERS
Over 1,400 youth have become members at our Drop-In Center.

VITAL DOCUMENT RECOVERIES
In 2019, we supported 192 vital document recoveries which are essential to securing housing and employment.

CONVERSATION THEMES in 2019
Vital Document Recovery – 15%
Housing Access- 12%
Employment Support- 27%
Education Support – 20%
Counseling – 4%
Case Management – 6%
General Support – 10%
Other – 6%.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    When merging, our organization prioritized feedback from the Youth Advisory Council in determining all of the naming, branding and marketing aspects of the new organization.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

AYA YOUTH COLLECTIVE
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AYA YOUTH COLLECTIVE

Board of directors
as of 1/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Melissa Jackson

The Vantage Group

Khara DeWit

KD Accounting Services

Jacques Moss

Amway

Jocelyn Hodack

ArtiFlex Manufacturing

Mike Keller

Booking.com

Ja-Quari Moore-Bass

Kentwood Public Schools

Krista Helder

Herman Miller

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/14/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.