GOLD2022

Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary

Refuge, Rehabilitation, Retirement

Medina, OH   |  www.foreveramber.org

Mission

The mission of Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary (“FAAAS”) is to provide safe refuge, purposeful rehabilitation and retirement aftercare for special needs horses to serve at-risk military veterans, active-duty military service members and first-responders dealing with combat and other trauma-related psychological and emotional challenges.

Ruling year info

2014

Principal Officer

Michele Bolinger

Main address

1133 Granger Road

Medina, OH 44256 USA

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EIN

46-2558065

NTEE code info

(Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs)) (D20)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The prevalence of under-served military veterans, first-responders and civilians suffering from PTSD and related disorders, as well as addiction, abuse, bullying and other psychological and emotional traumas is on the rise in our N.E. OH service area. For many, conventional therapies are not effective in producing long-term, sustainable improvements to these conditions. Our aim is to provide equine-assisted psychotherapy ("EAP") as a stand-alone treatment or adjunct to those in need in our community and to make it accessible to low to moderate income folks whether or not they have the means to pay for treatment.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

V.E.T.S Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy

A certified, professionally supervised, psychotherapy framework devised to allow every participant an individualized opportunity to discover, learn and grow from the human-horse relationship in a supportive, compassionate environment. EAGALA is the globally recognized Gold Standard of Mental Health Professionals practicing Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (“EAP”). Under the EAGALA Model, the horse functions as the primary facilitator of the treatment team in collaboration with a certified Equine Specialist and credentialed, accredited Mental Health Professional. Sessions may be structured individually or in small groups with one or more equines as deemed appropriate by the treatment team. EAGALA is not therapeutic riding. Engaging the unique, intuitive power of the horse to sense individual emotions and feelings, professionally supervised encounters occur on the ground allowing human and horse to approach one another on equal footing in a safe, non-judgmental environment. Put simply, the horse is a therapy partner without an agenda.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

A small group Equine-Assisted Learning ("EAL") program offered at no-charge to military veterans and active-duty service members. Focused on rebuilding trust and confidence, participants work together to identify and tackle the challenges they encounter as they work to reintegrate into civilian life while sharing the esprit de corps many express missing once separated from the military. Workshops are facilitated by an EAGALA Certified Equine Specialist with one or more horses participating in guided, safe, ground activities and exercises specifically tailored to the objectives of the group

Population(s) Served
Veterans

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

EAGALA 2017

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to become the best-in-class provider of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy ("EAP") Services employing the EAGALA treatment model in NE OH. EAGALA is the globally recognized gold-standard for EAP treatment. To accomplish this we will:

>Identify those that would most benefit from equine-assisted psychotherapy, particularly the uninsured, and provide access at no-cost to those qualifying as low-moderate income according to HUD guidelines.

>Develop, train and EAGALA certify an exceptional treatment team consisting of certified, accredited mental health and equine professionals to serve our northeast Ohio service area

Continue to build-out and train our treatment team of licensed, accredited mental health professionals and equine professionals with the EAGALA certifications and on-going training required for exceptional, results-oriented service delivery.

Expand outreach efforts within the community with a focus on Title 1 middle and high schools, community health and human service organizations providing support services to low-to-moderate income families and military veterans organizations in our service area.

Develop and implement metrics based assessment tools to track and measure program efficacy over time.

Devise individualized approaches for treatment within the confines of the EAGALA framework, in tandem with conventional therapy (where indicated) to address each participant’s needs, goals, treatment history and comfort levels

Formalize a means of assessing important outcomes in subject participants e.g. efficacy of EAP as a stand-alone or adjunct to conventional therapies for future program use

Train and EAGALA certify an Equine Professional with a Military Liaison Designation to better meet the needs of the military veteran community

Strengthen on-going grant funding and other fundraising efforts to meet 3 year no-cost program service delivery targets

>Facility infrastructure improvements to support planned program activities will be completed mid-2020

>Board member designated as Community Outreach Coordinator in 2019

>Established relationships with local area health and human service organizations focused on at-risk populations including military veterans and first-responders

>Monthly program data-tracking implemented in 2019

>EAGALA certification of 2 additional treatment team members needed to increase program service activities will be completed in September, 2020

>High-level Board engagement dedicated to excellence and organization success

> In 2019 we provided approximately 200 program service hours to a wide range of constituents from military veterans, spouses and children to at-risk civilian adults, adolescents and teens in Summit, Medina, Cuyahoga and Portage counties in NE OH

>Approximately 20% of 2019 equine-assisted psychotherapy services were provided at no cost through our V.E.T.S Scholarship Fund.

> In 2019 we received grant funding to expand EAP services to civilians in Summit County in 2020.

> In the 4th quarter of 2019, we served an average of 50 clients monthly and project this to be within the monthly range we expect to serve in 2020.

>In 2019 we offered an Equine-Assisted Learning (“EAL”) group, “HorsePower,” to kids dealing with bullying in school and other issues. We expected this to be a one-time event but demand has been so high, we have offered 2 additional groups thus far with quarterly groups planned for 2020.

>Building on this theme, our treatment team has developed 2 additional EAL groups, “Unbridled” to support women contending with issues and challenges at home and in the workplace and “Comrades-in-Arms” for military service members. Each of these was successfully conducted in the first quarter of 2020 with future offerings scheduled throughout 2020.

> Designated as "essential" providing mental health services to our community, our organization was exempt from stay-at-home restrictions imposed by COVID-19 and continued to offer equine-assisted psychotherapy sessions 2 days per week throughout the crisis.

> With the expansion of our treatment team from 4 to 6 we now have the capacity to increase from 2 to 3 session days per week with greater scheduling flexible to better serve existing and prospective clients

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    At-risk, low to moderate income individuals in NE OH impacted by PTSD and other trauma with a focus on military veterans, first responders and their family members

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Expanded program offerings added in 2021-22 include grief and hospice support, topical women's empowerment workshops and military spousal support groups to address the unique needs of these specific groups.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Forever Amber Acres Animal Sanctuary

Board of directors
as of 11/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James Moran

Deborah Loesel

Rebecca Wildman

Jean Kelly

Nina Davis

Michele Bolinger

Cindy Wise

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.