Mission 22

Veterans * Family * Communities

aka Mission 22   |   Sisters, OR   |  www.mission22.com

Mission

Mission 22 supports the veteran community with three main programs; veteran treatment programs, memorials and community social impact. Mission 22 provides treatment programs to veterans for Post-Traumatic Stress, Traumatic Brain Injury or other issues they might be facing. It organizes events and builds memorials to create social impact and awareness for these issues. Mission 22 serves combat veterans, those injured in training who therefore could not deploy and victims of MST. Mission 22 also has an Ambassador volunteer program for people to get involved as well. Ambassadors educate the public on veteran issues, help get veterans into Mission 22 treatment programs and create resources in their communities. Through these three programs, it enables a push for the betterment of our community

Ruling year info

2013

CEO

Sara Johnson

President

Mike Kissel

Main address

694 N Larch St #910

Sisters, OR 97759 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-2750726

NTEE code info

Visual Arts Organizations (A40)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mission 22 is a national community supporting active service members, Veterans, and their family members, through three areas of focus: Support and Treatment Programs For active service members, Veterans, and their family members, addressing Post-Traumatic Stress, Traumatic Brain Injury, suicide risk and other challenges. Social Impact Uniting civilians and the military community to raise awareness of issues active service members, veterans, and their family members face. Memorials Remembering and honoring service members and Veterans through large scale installations and digital initiatives, while raising awareness for issues faced on home soil.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mission 22 Social Impact Program

Through Mission 22's social impact programs we educate the public on the difficulties veterans are facing today, such as Post Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. As well as the epidemic of veteran suicide in America. It teaches them how to get involved and support in their communities. Ambassadors create dialog, events and education as well as bring veterans and the communities together.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Adults

Mission 22 brings together veterans and their communities through large scale public works of art. These installations raise awareness for the issues veterans are facing today as well as educate communities on how to get involved. A partnership is formed between veterans working on the projects and the communities and a story telling is created which breaks down barriers so growth and healing can happen.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Veterans

Mission 22 has created comprehensive treatment programs for Post Traumatic Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury. One size does not fit all and our programs are formed around the individual in treatment to create a program that fits what they are needing to heal.

Mission 22 also has partner organizations that we fund treatment through as well. Our partner organizations specialize in Post Traumatic Stress, Traumatic Brain Injury, substance abuse and all of the issues veterans are facing today.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Children and youth
Families
Parents

The Recovery and Resiliency program (R+R), developed by Mission 22, seeks to synthesize the most
scientifically backed and time-honored trauma recovery processes into a single, cohesive, cohort-based
platform. Where other post-traumatic stress recovery protocols focus on just one or two areas of
recovery, R+R respects the fact that healing from combat stress is not a simple matter of chemistry.
Recovery from war requires input from the warrior’s community at home, nutritional support, spiritual
healing, and physical renewal. The warrior is equally valued at home as they are downrange, yet this journey
home has been taken for granted by society, leading to unacceptable rates of Veterans losing their sense of
purpose, losing their sense that they belong in the homefront. This program is for veterans, active duty and spouses.



Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel
Caregivers
Widows and widowers

This program is located at Mission 22 headquarters in Sisters, Oregon. This is a program primarily for children while supportting their whole family. Community is a key aspect to this program, creating a place for military and veteran families to meet and get to know one another as well on a local level. Our Equine Program director and head trainer is a PATH certified therapeutic riding instructor who has expertise in working with children. Horsemanship builds self-confidence, as a child progresses in their horseback riding skills, they develop self-confidence and self-assurance. It helps with coordination and balance. From a physical development side, horseback riding improves balance and motor coordination. Hand-eye coordination, core strength, and muscular development also bene􀃶t from horseback riding. It also improves focus, Studies have shown that children who engage in horseback riding have better cognitive abilities. The skills and attributes children acquire while learning horseback riding then spill over into their scholastic performance.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Veterans
Military personnel
Family relationships
Veterans
Military personnel
Family relationships

Where we work

Awards

Indiana HCR 37 2015

Indiana State Government

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Veterans

Related Program

Mission 22 Social Impact Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Mission 22, our commitment could not be more personal. Mission 22 was founded by Veterans. Most of our staff are Veterans, spouses of Veterans, or have immediate family members who have served in the US military.

We provide extensive, personalized support and resources to help Veterans and their families thrive. Mission 22’s programs for Veterans and military spouses offer everything from biometric monitoring of stress, sleep, and activity levels; to meditation and coaching; to exercise programs and a wellness supplement regimen; to books and learning resources to help Veterans put their experience in context.

Mission 22 recognizes that a Veteran’s experience is a family’s experience – families live through all of the ups and downs that soldiers returning home do. We’ve developed a support program exclusively for spouses to take positive steps that renew their identities as individuals and the strengths they bring to their household.

Our Ambassador program further supports Veterans and military families – a network of more than 3,500 Veterans and civilians in all 50 states and around the world. We work to advance society’s collective understanding of the issues faced by active service members, Veterans, and their families.

At Mission 22, we know firsthand that Veterans and service members bring extensive skills and assets to any situation. Their leadership capabilities, experiences, and sense of teamwork and integrity are unmatched. Veterans know how to rise to a challenge.

America’s Veterans make our society stronger. They deserve a community worthy of all they have given, and all they will yet achieve. We are proud to continue designing programs for Veterans and their families, and to welcome them into our community.

At Mission 22, our commitment could not be more personal. Mission 22 was founded by Veterans. Most of our staff are Veterans, spouses of Veterans, or have immediate family members who have served in the US military.

We provide extensive, personalized support and resources to help Veterans and their families thrive. Mission 22’s programs for Veterans and military spouses offer everything from biometric monitoring of stress, sleep, and activity levels; to meditation and coaching; to exercise programs and a wellness supplement regimen; to books and learning resources to help Veterans put their experience in context.

Mission 22 recognizes that a Veteran’s experience is a family’s experience – families live through all of the ups and downs that soldiers returning home do. We’ve developed a support program exclusively for spouses to take positive steps that renew their identities as individuals and the strengths they bring to their household.

Our Ambassador program further supports Veterans and military families – a network of more than 3,500 Veterans and civilians in all 50 states and around the world. We work to advance society’s collective understanding of the issues faced by active service members, Veterans, and their families.

At Mission 22, we know firsthand that Veterans and service members bring extensive skills and assets to any situation. Their leadership capabilities, experiences, and sense of teamwork and integrity are unmatched. Veterans know how to rise to a challenge.

America’s Veterans make our society stronger. They deserve a community worthy of all they have given, and all they will yet achieve. We are proud to continue designing programs for Veterans and their families, and to welcome them into our community.

RECOVERY + RESILIENCY
Recovery + Resiliency is a 12-month program available to combat Veterans, those who were injured and therefore could not deploy, and those who have experienced MST. There is also a 6-month version for non-combat veterans and a 6-month program for spouses of veterans and active duty


MISSION 22 WELLNESS PROGRAM
Mission 22 has partnered with Amare to provide free mental wellness supplements to combat veterans, those injured in training who therefore could not deploy or those affected by MST.
These supplements have been clinically proven to alleviate tensions, fatigue, confusion and anger by more than 40%.


HONORING OUR WARRIOR SPIRIT
A ROCK-CLIMBING AND MENTAL-TRAINING PROGRAM FOR COMBAT VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES

The Warrior’s Way® and Mission 22® are partnering to provide rock climbing mental training programs for veterans and their families to diminish veteran suicide rates and build resilient families. Please click the button below to learn more and find an event near you.


CROSSFIT, BRAZILIAN JIU JITSU, AND JUDO SPONSORSHIPS
Our treatment programs are made better when veterans are also involved in great communities like Crossfit or BJJ. We offer three month sponsorships to gyms for any veteran in our program who qualifies and has a financial hardship need. As well as stand-alone gym sponsorships to veterans who are not able to afford them.


Mission Troopers Equine Program is our first program for the children of our veterans.
Participants are provided with horseback riding lessons at no cost. Riding is proven to build self-confidence, improve coordination and balance, and increase focus. This program also supports the whole family through community engagement.
This program is available to the children and grandchildren of American veterans.

Mission 22 has created comprehensive and successful treatment programs for PTS and TBI. Mission 22 Ambassadors have grown are in all 50 states and internationally as well as working to end veterans' suicide in their communities. The War at Home Memorial has moved to its permanent home in Broken Arrow Oklahoma. Over the next year, we are working to grow the Ambassadors, expand our treatment programs for veterans as well as create a new program for spouses that will be launching in the spring.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Veterans, their families, and their communities.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The way we were running a program (via email) was not working for participants. So we built an online learning module with login access and a direct way to guide them through it, rather than a self-guided email series. This will allow them to have a clear course of action for the program as well as a better understanding of a future program than can participate in as well.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    It has allowed us to grow and become an organization that can serve in a more effective way. This creates an opportunity for program growth as well as more depth in our programming and offerings to participants, as well as a stronger community.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Mission 22
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Mission 22

Board of directors
as of 3/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mike Kissel

Mike Kissel

Brad Hubbard

Randy LaVere

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data