Rock to Recovery

Music is the Medicine!

Laguna Beach, CA   |  www.rocktorecovery.org

Mission

Rock to Recovery helps people heal and transform their lives through the powerful experience of writing, playing, and performing music as a group.

Ruling year info

2015

Principal Officer

Wesley Geer

Main address

375 Aster St.

Laguna Beach, CA 92651 USA

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EIN

46-2782110

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

Mental Health Disorders (F70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Substance abuse and mental health concerns are debilitating millions of Americans. It is estimated that more than 20 million Americans have a substance use disorder that rises to the level of "addiction." Opioid overdose kills tens of thousands each year. Alcohol abuse costs the economy millions and ends more than 90,000 lives annually. Trauma in many forms affects those who have been sex trafficked, abused as children, survived domestic violence, participated in armed conflict, and many others. We use music, specifically playing music and writing songs as a group, to help people address these and other mental health concerns.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rock to Recovery: Music Sessions

Rock to Recovery was designed to to bring the therapeutic elements of writing, playing and expression through music, to non-musicians.

Population(s) Served
Military personnel
Veterans

Our music-based meditation offerings provide support and skills to reduce stress and increase self-awareness. We provide a number of services including: breathwork, yoga nidra, metta, mindfulness, and guided meditations.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Social and economic status
Adults
Adolescents
Social and economic status
Sexual identity
Substance abusers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Veterans, Adults, Adolescents, Victims of crime and abuse, Substance abusers

Related Program

Rock to Recovery: Music Sessions

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of support groups offered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Substance abusers, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims and oppressed people, Veterans

Related Program

Rock to Recovery: Music Sessions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of songs written in a therapeutic setting.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Substance abusers, At-risk youth, Veterans

Related Program

Rock to Recovery: Music Sessions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We bring light and hope to people early in their recovery process, through the healing power of music. Through our music programs, we show people how capable they are to write, express, perform, challenge themselves, and find true inner happiness. In the process, they also find increasing measures of wellness like: hope, joy, positivity, connection, self-esteem & increased motivation.

At present, we provide direct music program services to more than 2500 people each month, in 100+ treatment facilities in 4 states. We also have a contract with the Department of Defense to serve the Air Force Wounded Warrior program (AFW2). Through direct services, the connection of our 15 "rock stars" to the individuals we work with, we form bands and write songs together.

We have a catalogue of 19,000 songs, written in the past 8 years.

We expand services to nonprofit organizations as funding is available to do so.

We have a broad market reach through our 8 years of service to substance abuse and mental health recovery communities. All of our musicians are in recovery, and bring not only top-notch musical ability, but also true empathy for and experience with recovery.

In addition to our deep networks, we have an annual sold-out Rock to Recovery Award Show and Concert. This concert, while a fundraising event, is also an opportunity to grow our reach, exposure and revenue. Nearly 60% of the people who attend the show are in rehab. They come as an outing to have fun and hear a message of hope, to experience that recovery can be great fun!

We have also added a Rock to Recovery Radio show, and podcast that is bring more visibility to our founder and the organization as a whole.

Since the org inception in 12/12/12 by our founder, Wesley Geer, we have grown to staff 15 program administrators who deliver 500+ sessions monthly, in California, Oregon, Washington, and Tennessee. We also work with the Air Force Wounded Warrior (AFW2) program through a contract with the Department of Defense. We serve more than 100 facilities, helping approximately 2500 people each month. We have also written more than 19,000 songs.

We started concert fundraisers in 2016 and have had four sold out shows honoring people like Mike Ness (singer, Social Distortion) Wayne Kramer (guitarist, MC5 and Founder of Jail Guitar Doors) and Corey Taylor (singer, Slipknot, Stonesour). We've honored Moby, Katey Sagal (Sons of Anarchy, Married with Children), and John Feldman (Goldfinger). In Austin, we have honored Kathy Valentine (GoGos) and Bob Schneider. Performers have included Chester Bennington, Fred Durst, Steve Stevens, members of Stone Temple Pilots, Chris Chaney, Franky Perez, and Shavo Odadjian, to name a few. Celebrity event supporters have been Drew Carey, Jamie Pressly, Tito Ortiz, Andy Dick, Idina Manzel, Jason Wahler, Brandon Novak, Eden Sassoon, etc.

The concerts have been sober events and proven very unique and highly valued part of the recovery communities, offering unique experiences for people in recovery and sponsor partners as well. These vents run in the fall, each year. 2016's event raised $20,000. In 2018, we raised more than $80,000. Each year, the show raises a bit more.

Our unique business model of having a for-profit entity as well, gives us the ability to offset 95% of the admin costs, by absorbing them by the for profit entity. This lets most of our revenue go strictly to program revenue.

Our strategic goals are to double the number of nonprofit program partners that we serve in the next three years. We want to bring services to more people in need, including youth, veterans, women, and others who want to have a song returned to their lives.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email, We solicit regular feedback from our program partners.,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We began offering free, public facing, virtual programming at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic lockdowns. We saw a need for mental health support. Our online community has grown. We now offer 4 hours of public programming a week and will continue to do so until lockdown orders have been removed and/or there is no longer a need.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, most of our participants are in rehab, so providing feedback isn't a priority for them,

Financials

Rock to Recovery
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rock to Recovery

Board of directors
as of 3/4/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Wes Geer


Board co-chair

Dr. Constance Scharff

Rock to Recovery

Term: 2018 -

Sonny Mayo

Board Secretary

Michelle Gilman

Kimiko Miller

Brandon Jordan

Sharon Chambers-Gilday

Board Treasurer

Joe Fletcher

Silas Burke

Paul Moen

Ricky Barnes

Laura Niedringhaus

Priscilla Vento

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/06/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/06/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.