WILD NATURE INSTITUTE

Science, Education, and Actions for the Protection of Wild Nature

Concord, NH   |  www.wildnatureinstitute.org

Mission

The Wild Nature Institute Conducts Scientific Research on At-Risk Wildlife Species and Their Habitats, Advocates for Their Protection, and Educates the Public About the Need to Preserve Wild Nature.

Ruling year info

2014

CEO and Principal Scientist

Dr. Derek Lee

CFO and Principal Scientist

Dr. Monica Bond

Main address

15 North Main Street, #208

Concord, NH 03301 USA

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EIN

46-3021940

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The biodiversity and extinction crisis caused by human activities threatens the wild natural systems that provide our plant's life-support system. To preserve all living creatures in natural ecosystems is to also preserve human liberty and happiness.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Western US Forests

Snag Forest Habitat Protection
The Wild Nature Institute's goal is to ensure that research on forest fire, insect outbreaks, and wildlife is translated into improved forest-protection policies and effective forest-management activities that conserve snag forests: a critical, scarce, and misunderstood wildlife habitat.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Northern Plains Campaign
For Community Conservation and Development
The Tarangire Ecosystem of northern Tanzania is a global wildlife hotspot but becoming increasingly endangered by habitat loss and severe bushmeat poaching. Wildlife populations are declining drastically in the Tarangire Ecosystem. The last best remaining breeding grounds for Tarangire migratory wildlife is the Northern Plains, but the migratory route to this area is critically threatened. Promising community conservation efforts are underway to give local villagers ownership of wildlife resources and the chance to benefit economically through ecotourism.

We have produced a multi-language children's book to educate local Masai villagers about the importance of this migratory corridor and the benefits they could receive from wildlife-based eco-tourism. These books are locally printed in Tanzania and distributed to schools and homes throughout the corridor as part of a large-scale environmental education campaign to mobilize the communities for conservation. This unique book is one of the only children's books written in Maa, the language of the Masai people of northern Tanzania. The story of Lucky the Wildebeest teaches Masai children ecological lessons about the wild animals that share their homeland, and how those animals can be an economic benefit through ecotourism. The story also promotes literacy with all text side-by-side in Maa, English, and Kiswahili, the national language of Tanzania.

Our goal is to protect the wildlife migratory route from Tarangire to the Northern Plains, galvanize community conservation through land-use planning, initiate local moran anti-poaching patrols, and promote grassroots eco-tourism development in order to conserve and develop the economy, the ecology, and the culture of the Tarangire Ecosystem.

In July 2014, we began an exciting new partnership supporting community land-use planning in the northern corridor. This is a 200,000 euro program with Trias, The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, Dorobo Fund, Maliasili Initiatives, and several Tanzanian organizations. Land-use plans are now being developed in 2 villages, and human-wildlife conflict reduction and anti-poaching patrols are being organized by Honeyguide Foundation. We are continuing to help the remaining 8 villages to begin the land-use planning process. Now is an excellent opportunity to support community conservation in Tanzania.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The gentle, iconic Giraffe indicates the health of African savanna ecosystems, home to the most spectacular displays of wildlife in the world.

But savanna ecosystems are in serious trouble. Habitat loss, illegal hunting, and disease are decimating savanna wildlife. Giraffe numbers have declined drastically to only 80,000. Africa-wide, elephants outnumber giraffe 5 to 1.

Despite the popularity of giraffes, scientists know surprisingly little about them. To save giraffes and their savanna habitat, we must understand where they are doing well, and why.

We need your help to do this.

Scientists from Wild Nature Institute are studying wild giraffes using a computer program that recognizes each animal’s unique fur pattern from photographs. With this special tool we are monitoring more than 1,500 individual giraffe throughout their lifetimes in an area over 1,700 sq. km. This is the biggest large-mammal demography study in history.

We are learning how natural and human factors affect giraffe survival, births, and movements. We work in the Tarangire Ecosystem of northern Tanzania, which supports one of the largest concentrations of wildlife in Africa, but is mostly unprotected.

Our research is urgently needed so we can provide effective conservation actions and ensure the future of wild giraffes and all creatures of the savanna. We are also participating in the global status assessment of giraffe currently being conducted through the IUCN.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Masai Giraffe Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Juma the Giraffe children's books, posters, and activities based learning program is being used at more than a dozen schools in Tanzania where giraffes live.

Number of research studies conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Peer-reviewed scientific publications authored by our scientists.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Goal of the Wild Nature Institute is to Preserve Wild Nature by Conducting Scientific Research on At-Risk Wildlife Species and Their Habitats, Advocating for Their Protection, and Educating the Public.

The Wild Nature Institute's scientists conduct original primary field research, analyze existing available data, and synthesize scientific literature. Avenues for dissemination of results include reports and peer-reviewed publications, presentations at scientific and management conferences, articles and editorials in the media, meetings with decision-makers, comments on land-management plans, and other innovative outlets.

We provide:
Wildlife Surveys
Population Assessment and Monitoring
Statistical Analysis of Population Data
Radio-Telemetry Studies
Capture-Mark-Recapture Studies
Resource Selection and Habitat Studies
GIS Mapping and Analysis
Expert Declarations
Synthesis Reports
Media campaigns
Popular articles
Public speaking engagements
Children's environmental education programs

We broadened our efforts to safeguard African savannas and American forests. We expanded our wildlife surveys into new areas of Tanzania, and we distributed thousands of multi-lingual children's books about wildlife to underprivileged schoolchildren in the area. We challenged logging in habitat critical for California Spotted Owls and requested federal protection for this imperiled subspecies.

Financials

WILD NATURE INSTITUTE
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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WILD NATURE INSTITUTE

Board of directors
as of 11/15/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Derek Lee

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/15/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data