REAL FOOD FOR KIDS

McLean, VA   |  www.realfoodforkids.org

Mission

Real Food for Kid's mission is to collaborate with school communities to elevate the quality and character of school food, develop and deliver programs that advance literacy in nutrition and health, and engage students, parents, and schools in building a culture of health that spreads to their homes and communities.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Bonnie Moore

Main address

6166 Hardy Drive

McLean, VA 22101 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-3514249

NTEE code info

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Day

The Food Day program is a fun, engaging, multi-faceted, interactive student experience in a Title I school designed to increase student’s understanding that healthful foods and exercise – that are also delicious and fun – can have a positive effect on their academics and their physical and emotional health.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Chef Academy is a professional development opportunity for school food service managers and staff to build culinary skills and inspire creativity for school food service environments. The program's success is seen through newly developed, scratch-cooked menu items, developed on-site by cafeteria staff and scaled for full school division implementation.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Real Food for Kids Culinary Challenge is an opportunity for students to play a change-maker role in improving what's on the menu in their cafeterias. Middle and High School teams are challenged to create a healthy school lunch, breakfast, or snack designed to meet high standards for nutrition, taste, presentation and originality.

Population(s) Served
Students

Real Food for Kids has been recognized as a successful model in school advocacy due to a positive approach in policy and practice and building collaborative relationships to affect change. Our Advocacy Training is designed to foster a more robust and engaged culture of health at schools by turning passions into action plans. Of our mission pillars, none is more important than engaging students, parents, and schools in building a culture of health that spreads to their homes and communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Real Food for Kids: Chefs Feeding Families is a joint initiative with Washington, D.C., metro-area restaurants to provide nourishing grab-and-go meals to families impacted by school closures and job losses due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Through collaborations with D.C.-area restaurants, the initiative creates local employment opportunities in one of the hardest hit sectors — one position at a time. The initiative was co-founded by Chef David Guas of Bayou Bakery, Coffee Bar & Eatery in Arlington, Virginia, and Real Food for Kids.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Real Food for Kids serves children and their families experiencing nutrition insecurity throughout the greater Washignton region.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Real Food for Kids believes that our ability to be nimble and respond to the challenges of adverse situations with creativity has enabled our mission to thrive. We credit the strong, authentic relationships we have built with our partners to work through obstacles and opportunities collaboratively. At the onset of the pandemic, we launched our Chefs Feeding Families initiative and partnered with area chefs to provide plant-forward prepared meals. With the widespread acceptance of the produce in these meals, the program evolved to providing chef curated meal kits and produce bags to families facing persistent nutrition insecurity.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The feedback we received from the people we serve at our Chefs Feeding Families distribution sites illuminated the need for accessible, affordable produce. This inspired us to gather formative research from the people we serve in Arlington, VA to shape a SNAP Demonstration Project Waiver to evaluate a produce incentive paired with a sugar sweetened beverage restriction. This groundbreaking design, supported by Arlington County and Virginia Department of Social Services is currently being reviewed by the USDA.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

REAL FOOD FOR KIDS
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

REAL FOOD FOR KIDS

Board of directors
as of 08/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rick Barnard

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/22/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.