PLATINUM2024

HELP OUR WOUNDED FOUNDATION

One Hero at a Time

aka The HOW Foundation of South Florida   |   Delray Beach, FL   |  www.howfoundationsf.org

Mission

The HOW Foundation of South Florida improves the quality of life for individuals, families, and communities by advocating for and providing access to hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Notes from the nonprofit

A hand up; not a handout is the credo of the Help Our Wounded Foundation (HOW). Founded in 2014, HOW is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that has proudly served our veterans across the country for the past 9 years. Our mission is to improve the quality of life for individuals, families, and communities by advocating for and providing access to life-changing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Within this field, we focus on serving people suffering from Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) two populations that are known to be at higher risk for suicide. Through the past nine years, HOW Foundation has provided over 3,700 hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment sessions for more than 175 people, helping them recover from the debilitating symptoms of TBI and PTSD. Foundation-wide, our data is showing us that we have a 98% successful rehabilitation rate when it comes to improvements in neuropsychological functioning.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Ms. Sarah Crane

Main address

1030 Wallace Drive Suite C

Delray Beach, FL 33444 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-3568088

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (E12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (F12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

HOW Foundation would like to give people with brain injuries and post-traumatic stress a proactive way they can reclaim their brain health. While many organizations are currently studying and monitoring the devastating effects of brain injuries and post-traumatic stress, very few provide options for those afflicted to actually try and recover from those injuries. \n\nWe not only provide a means for people to proactively reclaim their brain health, but also a safe, healthy, non-invasive and non-pharmaceutically-based option through hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Veteran Investment Program

The Veteran Investment Program offers 40 hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) sessions to veterans suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress (PTS), as well as neuropsychological testing before and after to demonstrate program efficacy.

Studies have shown that after completing a minimum of 40 HBOT sessions, there have been improvements in veterans' overall quality of life. Some veterans have reported that they are feeling less anxiety, and they are more likely to participate in daily activities with their families and friends.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

This program offers people suffering from traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress the opportunity to experience 40 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (with pre-and post- treatment neuropsychological testing), regardless of whether they have a military background.

The focus of this program is on treating acute traumatic brain injuries and concussions (i.e., those sustained within 6 months), and is intended to be used as an emergency fund.

Population(s) Served
Adults

While we appreciate the importance of treating sustained concussions and brain injuries, we also recognize the importance of preventing brain injuries.

To this end, our quarterly Brain Health program focuses on community outreach and educating our community on what the brain is, basic brain mechanics, as well as how to achieve optimal brain health and brain safety.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit of the Year Finalist 2022

.ORG

Affiliations & memberships

Veteran Service Organization of the Year 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who report adequate participation in their own treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Related Program

Veteran Investment Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Those who arranged their own transportation and reported to the hyperbaric oxygen therapy center for daily treatments.

Total number of client suicides

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We have experienced 0 client suicides.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have never received any complaints about the treatment of our recipients as they undergo their hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Number of new clients within the past 12 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities, Students

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Because we are a young Foundation, one of our outcome metrics is reaching out to people in need of our services. In this case, recipients have been suffering from traumatic brain injury and/or PTS.

Number of people who completed the treatment protocol.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Military personnel, Veterans, People with psychosocial disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our protocol takes a significant commitment from our recipients. Sometimes, recipients are not able to complete the treatment protocol of 40 sessions.

Number of recipients who reported an increased quality of life.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of recipients who stopped thinking about self-harm or suicide.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Emergency responders, Military personnel, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Not all of our recipients are suicidal when seeking treatment. But, of those who were, all of them stopped thinking about suicide after receiving treatment.

Number of recipients who reported decreased insomnia.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Not all of our recipients had insomnia when they sought treatment. All of them were able to sleep regularly within the first week of treatment.

Number of recipients who reported having increased emotional stability.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Not all of our recipients felt out emotionally volatile when they sought treatment. All of them felt more in control after treatment.

Number of recipients who reported decreased headaches (including migraines).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Not all of our recipients had chronic headaches when they sought treatment. Of those who did, all recipients who had experienced headaches reported feeling better (fewer headaches) after treatment.

Number of participants who returned for "Maintenance Sessions" (10).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Three veterans requested additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions beyond the approved protocol of 20 treatment sessions.

Number of clients who showed quantitative improvement via neuroimaging scans or other clinical, standardized assessments.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We use medical assessments to quantify improvement. All patients have reported a qualitative improvement, as well.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our Vision is: Everyone has access to hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

Good health and wellbeing: \nAn example, from our Veteran Investment Program:\nOnce veterans physically return to the US ecosystem from serving overseas, their presence affects their families and communities. Veterans often feel a mixture of overwhelming emotions: loneliness, misunderstood, frustration, and suffering from brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder. Some veterans learn how to manage these feelings on their own but many of them do not. Pent up emotions, without healthy coping mechanisms in place, can result in violent outbursts that damage relationships within their homes. Spouses, caregivers, and children are emotionally or physically abused, causing an even deeper divide between veterans and their families. Not being able to see the brain injuries lying beneath the surface, spouses and caregivers are sometimes baffled at what they can do to reduce their partner’s anger. Children witness their parents fighting, which affects their ability to correctly control their own emotions or emulate a proper role model. It also results in student adverse childhood experiences (or ACES). In turn, this can cause stunted emotional development, setting the child up for a future of challenges in acquiring healthy coping mechanisms. This can negatively affect the future community of South Palm Beach County, by in some cases requiring the children to be removed from the parent’s custody and placed in a stable foster home.\n\nAddressing veterans’ mental and physical health is upstream of numerous situations that can result in a creating toxic home environment. Therefore, it is critical we address these causes of veterans' suffering. Doing so will not only elevate the veteran him/herself, but it also affect the health and wellbeing of their nucleic family and the greater community. \n\n---\nPartnerships: \nWe believe we can accomplish more working with other organizations than just on our own. Think of the brain as a computer. You can have amazing software, but if there's no hardware to run it on, it doesn't matter how good your software may be. Brain injuries cause damage to your brain's hardware. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy helps rebuild the hardware of the brain. That's our specialty. However, psychological constructs form the software. Providing psychological services is not something we specialize in and lies beyond our skill set. \n\nHOW Foundation cannot be a comprehensive answer for everyone with post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injuries. We recognize our limitations and provide referrals to organizations that can provide additional supportive care for cases that require structural supports that are beyond our skill set. \n\nSome examples of our partnering organizations: Grey Team Inc., Wounded Veterans Relief Fund, Support22Project, UnifiedDream, Athletes' Risk Management\n---\n\nFor more information, please visit our website at www.HOWFoundationSF.org

Our team members contribute to the success of the HOW Foundation. We are fortunate to have leading experts in a wide range of disciplines who are eager to support the Foundation (e.g., research, financial, medical, hyperbaric, first responders, philanthropic...etc.). Our strong collaborative methods, open dialogue, and facilities make us uniquely qualified to help those in our community.\r\n\r\nBy growing our Board, Foundation Ambassadors, and Alumni groups, we are constantly diversifying our means of being able to reach out and engage different groups across the United States. \r\n\r\nFor more information, please visit www.HOWFoundationSF.org.

We turned 6 years old, which is an accomplishment, especially given the difficulties faced this past year in the pandemic. Over those 6 years, we have provided 2,231 treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for people in need. Last March, it became clear COVID-19 would be a mental health pandemic, and we felt the repercussions from that by setting a record for the most people served in one year (29) and the most treatments provided in one year (704). \n\nOutreach:\nThis past year, our volunteers donated over 375 hours, which translates to $9,053.00 of donated time and service. These volunteers have assisted us with successfully engaging our community in activities to support veterans, the military community, and brain health. \n\nCollaborations:\nOver the past two years, we have partnered with other nonprofits assisting veterans. Some of these partnerships have been to provide additional modalities of healing therapies (Grey Team, Unified Dream, Connected Warriors), others have been to provide veterans with direct financial support (Wounded Veterans Relief Fund) and others have been to expand our reach and the number of veterans we can help in coordinated efforts with other nonprofits that have similar missions (Mission 22, America's Mighty Warriors, Support 22 Project).\n\nWhat's Next:\nWe are extremely excited to launch Operation Phoenix -- a program that will change the face of veteran wellness in South Florida. A targeted, focused effort between HOW Foundation and GreyTeam Inc. will help transitioning veterans by repairing physical damage caused to the brain through hyperbaric oxygen therapy, restoring the body to achieve peak physical fitness through training and nutrition, and rejuvenating the soul by connecting with nonprofits to find a sense of service beyond self after military separation. Sign up for our newsletter on our website (www.howfoundationsf.org) for more information and to learn about our launch date!\n\nAwards:\n2016: Boynton Beach Nonprofit of the Year\n2017: Business Person of the Year, Sarah Crane\n2019: Impact 100 of Southern Palm Beach County Finalist\n2019: Association of Fundraising Professionals of Palm Beach County Veteran Service Organization of the Year\n\nFor more information on our recent accomplishments, please visit www.HOWFoundationSF.org or find us on Facebook.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HELP OUR WOUNDED FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Michael Crane

Philip Lawrence

Inverness Counsel

Michael Crane

Eugenio Rodriguez

Delray Medical Center

Mason Howard

Miss Maggie's Earth Adventures

Richard Raborn

Gregg Weiss

Weiss Capital Management

Liza Stroud

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable