Arlington Neighborhood Villages

Making Arlington your home for a lifetime

aka Arlington Neighborhood Village   |   Arlington, VA   |  https://arlnvil.org

Mission

Arlington Neighborhood Village (ANV) is dedicated to helping older Arlington residents continue living in their own homes -- safely, independently, and with an enhanced quality of life. Neighbors help neighbors age-in-place in Arlington through support services, education, health and wellness activities that promote independence, a sense of community, and social connections.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Wendy Zenker

Main address

2666 Military Rd

Arlington, VA 22207 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-3591812

NTEE code info

Senior Centers/Services (P81)

Transportation (Free or Subsidized) (P52)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Surveys indicate that close to 90 percent of persons over the age of 65 would like to continue to live in their own homes as they age. As the daily challenges of living grow, however, seniors often need more support to remain safely and independently at home. Activities that used to be simple – driving, getting groceries, changing a light bulb or smoke detector battery – become tricky, or even hazardous, to do alone. In addition, as seniors age they may lose their ability to drive, careers wind down, friends and family move away, and their worlds become smaller. The resulting social isolation affects both physical and mental health and is a risk factor for a variety of diseases. Consequently, Arlington’s growing senior population who wish to remain in their homes need services and programs that allow them to do so safely and independently, while alleviating social isolation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Transportation

Volunteers drive members on round trips to places like medical and dental appointments, grocery shopping, ANV-sponsored outings, bank, beauty/barber shop. During the Covid-19 pandemic we are curtailing services that require people to share indoor space for an extended period of time, and are focusing on transportation only for essential requests. ANV is following the virus data for our area very closely, and will add back services only when it is safe to do so, always erring on the side of caution.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

A volunteer can visit a member in their home once a week for 1.5 to 2 hours. A walking buddy can come to a member's home once a week to walk with them. During the Covid-19 pandemic, these visits have been curtailed and replaced by our telephone buddy program that has matched over 120 members with volunteers who call periodically for friendly conversation and to ensure that the member has what they need to be safe at home. The friendships and connections made through this initiative are brightening the time at home for members and volunteers alike.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Beyond direct services, ANV brings our community together with hundreds of opportunities to engage socially each year. From weekly "coffee and conversations," to dine-arounds at local restaurants, happy hours, sports and exercise, special interest groups, and informative and engaging field trips, ANV members and volunteers enjoy many hours of social time together. All of these activities help to combat social isolation often experienced by seniors. During the Covid-19 pandemic, social events have moved to virtual gatherings with great success. Turnout has actually increased for many events. Volunteers lead technology (including Zoom) training sessions for members. Pop-up picnics with social distancing in neighborhood parks were added in nice weather.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

ANV was receiving an increasing number of requests from members who need help organizing paperwork or decluttering. We decided to train a group of decluttering volunteers. Two volunteers with professional experience in decluttering created an interactive training for those who wanted to help members declutter. The training was held in January 2020 and was attended by about 10 volunteers. The training emphasized that helping members declutter is a delicate undertaking, requiring patience, and developing a rapport with the member, time, and being ok with slow, steady progress. A private Facebook site was formed so that the decluttering team could share information and support each other in the decluttering efforts. Once the service was announced, several members have requested assistance in decluttering. Only our trained volunteers are assigned to assist in this service, which contributes to keeping members safe and happy in their homes. Volunteers help members donate unwanted items and help to sort through paperwork to determine what needs to be saved and filed.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Great Nonprofit 2021

Great Nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

Great Nonprofits 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers for ANV are vetted with background checks and undergo training. Data are end of year totals.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric represents the number of hours donated by ANV volunteers to provide services to members. The data are end of year totals.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Members of ANV are ages 58 to 98 years old; 71% are female; 63% are 75 years old or older; 51% live alone; 19% receive financial aid to support their membership. Data are end of year totals.

Service requests fulfilled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Two-thirds of all service requests are for transportation. 98% of all service requests are fulfilled. Data are end of year totals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

ANV aims to provide a wide range of programs, events, and services that address the needs of our senior population in Arlington, VA who wish to age-in-place. We provide this assistance via a large corps of dedicated, vetted and trained volunteers who provide services as well as opportunities for social connection for seniors. ANV's top three goals are as follows: (1) Serve more seniors so that they may continue to live safely and independently while feeling a part of their community. ANV is playing a larger role in addressing the needs of lower-income, at-risk seniors who are aging in place in Arlington, with partnerships serving as an important path to this achievement. ANV is deepening partnerships with the County Government and also senior-serving nonprofits like AFAC (Arlington Food Assistance Center) and APAH (Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing). During the pandemic, these organizations turned to ANV for assistance. Beginning in mid-March 2020, ANV decided to help Arlington seniors regardless of ANV membership, particularly with food deliveries; (2) Growing and managing our volunteer pool. Along with growing membership, especially of more vulnerable persons, we must grow our volunteer pool so that we can achieve 100 percent fulfillment of requests for assistance and connection; and (3) Capacity building. As we strive towards goals 1 and 2, we also need to prioritize capacity building - strengthening our management operation and technology support; increasing paid staff; moving to larger office space; improving our fiscal oversight and fundraising. We also seek to invest in decreasing the digital divide among seniors so that they can become more comfortable with technology for personal connection, medical assistance, information gathering and entertainment. These efforts will all require a steady stream of financial support.

Programs and services available to members of ANV include: Especially during COVID-19, volunteers perform errands (grocery shopping, medication pickup, cleaning supplies) and transportation to medical appointments, groceries, banks, beauty and barber shops. Other services include:
- Friendly visits and walking buddies for members on a weekly basis; during COVID, phone buddies.
- Daily check-in, involving a quick call to be sure everything is OK, and follow up if there is a problem.
- Household help such as changing light bulbs, replacing furnace filters, changing smoke alarm batteries, and hanging pictures.
- Technology assistance such as help with email issues, setting up a TV, programming a thermostat, and enabling the senior to chat online with their grandchildren.
- Decluttering whereby a trained volunteer assists a member with decluttering their home or organizing their files.
Membership in ANV includes access to the above services and also:
- Discounted emergency response system, “Lifeline,” provided through Virginia Hospital Center.
- Subscription to Arlington County 55+ programs that include exercise classes and local travel opportunities via the Arlington Seniors bus.
- Subscription to Washington Consumer Checkbook so that members can obtain information on reliable local service providers.

To reduce social isolation, ANV conducts social gatherings, outings, and educational activities: these include holiday potlucks, health and wellness programs; docent-led tours of local historical or cultural sites; weekly speakers on interesting topics; happy hours; dining out groups, and special interest groups – from gardening to bocce. During the pandemic, ANV has shifted many of its activities online, and we have trained our members in how to use Zoom technology to access these meetings and events.

ANV maintains a Financial Aid Fund to provide discounted membership to lower-income applicants. We have placed a priority on fundraising to strengthen ANV's Financial Aid Fund over the next three years.

ANV is in a unique position to be able to provide both direct support and the human connection to make aging in place in Arlington possible. A volunteer-driven operation, ANV has a clear view of the needs of seniors, and working with our partners, can provide more seniors in Arlington with the support, information, and community they need to age in place safely. We have a volunteer coordinator who oversees a growing corps of trained and vetted volunteers ready to help. Each month, more volunteers join ANV and receive training online.

ANV understands the extra challenges that seniors face if on a limited income. From the very beginning, ANV has been committed to not turning anyone away for inability to pay our membership fee of $500 annually. The Founders of ANV established a Financial Aid Fund with an initial anonymous matching gift of $5,000. Since then, without interruption, ANV has been able to provide assistance to all qualified applicants. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit, ANV realized it was in a position (due primarily to its trained corps of volunteers) to extend services to even more of the most at-risk seniors in the County. The pandemic has caused us to build upon our previous success of supporting low income seniors in-need and at-risk.

Securing dedicated funding for the Financial Aid Fund is a top priority and will be a continuous effort so that ANV can support more low-to-moderate income seniors via subsidized memberships. Our 2020 fundraising efforts included seeking gifts and grants from individuals, foundations, and corporations, focused on the need to build up the Financial Aid Fund to serve our most vulnerable seniors. ANV's growing success in obtaining philanthropic grants reflects the community's recognition of ANV's contribution to the health and well-being of seniors.

ANV is agile in its ability to respond to new needs in its environment. As COVID-19 descended on Arlington, ANV quickly adjusted its spending to match expense to projected income, while placing top priority on helping seniors, especially lower income seniors. ANV also quickly pivoted to providing formerly in-person social activities online and also moved to online training of new volunteers.

ANV is a rapidly growing village. Membership has grown from 205 at end of 2017 to 300 at end of 2020; the number of adult volunteers has grown from 201 in 2017 to about 300 in 2020. Volunteer training has been moved online, and the process of onboarding volunteers continues to run smoothly.

In 2020, ANV volunteers fulfilled 1,887 service requests. Volunteers contributed 7,180 hours and drove 20,510 miles on behalf of our members. The number attending our events totaled 4,488. These figures are down from the previous year due to the safety issues related to Covid-19. We moved many of our events from in-person to online, and trained our members how to access the events via their computers.

Forty-two percent of requests were for transportation to medical appointments or grocery shopping. Due to the pandemic, there was a substantial increase in the number of "contactless" errands: 30 percent were errands for groceries, prescription pick-up, or food delivery from the Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC). Other services performed in 2020 included home chores/maintenance; technology support, friendly visitors and phone buddies. Our new phone buddy program has matched over 120 members with volunteers who call periodically for friendly conversation and to ensure the member has what they need to be safe at home.

In 2020 and into 2021, ANV is supporting 80 new "temporary" lower-income members. We intend to make these members permanent in 2021 and beyond, using a sliding scale for membership based on income. We received a grant to enable us to employ a part-time Member Service Specialist in 2021 to work directly with lower-income seniors referred to ANV.

In 2020, ANV's fall Financial Aid Fundraising Campaign greatly surpassed our goal of $20,000, raising almost $30,000 to permit ANV to support more lower-income, at-risk and in-need seniors. Overall, in 2020, we raised $85,000 in donations and grants. We will build upon this success and make growing efforts to obtain grants from foundations and other nonprofits. We also have a new initiative in 2021 to engage more with the corporate community in Arlington.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Arlington Neighborhood Villages
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Arlington Neighborhood Villages

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Elise Burns

Elise Burns

Maureen Markham

Kathy Stokes

Larry Padberg

Cheryl Beversdorf

Brenda Cox

William Gainer

Charles King

Peter Olivere

Donna Pastore

John Richardson

Cathy Turner

Caroline Wertz

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data