Juvenile Justice Advocates International

Detention as a last resort for the shortest possible period of time.

aka The Children In Prison Project   |   Cambridge, MN   |  https://jjadvocates.org

Mission

Juvenile Justice Advoctes International's mission is to advocate for policy reforms in the juvenile justice system and improve respect for human rights for the most vulnerable. Our vision is that children should only be imprisoned as a last resort in extreme circumstances and for the shortest period of time possible.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Douglas Keillor

Main address

2905 E Rum River Dr S

Cambridge, MN 55008 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

International Justice Consulting, Inc.

EIN

46-3887790

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (I01)

Prison Alternatives (I44)

International Human Rights (Q70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Detention is a devastating experience for children. Overcrowding, unsanitary conditions, a lack of services, abuse, mistreatment and corruption are rampant. Children who spend even short periods of time in prison are twice as likely to suffer from depression or commit suicide, drop out of school and become addicted to drugs once they are released. According to a recent survey, 76 percent of juveniles in detention in Mexico have been abused or mistreated by the police, guards or prosecutors. In some states in Mexico, juveniles can be detained for up to 12 months while awaiting trial, and they spend as much as 22 hours per day in their cell. Children in poverty and ethnic minorities are the most vulnerable because they are nearly always denied bail or supervised release and are unable to pay bribes to receive better treatment in prison. Juveniles who have spent time in detention are the most likely to become criminals as adults, even recruited into gangs in prison, increasing crime.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Alternatives to Detention

Collaboratively work with local governments to reduce the time to trial for detained juveniles, develop effective screening tools to ensure low-risk children are released, and improve conditions of detention

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Mobilizing local communities to empower those most impacted by detention - children in detention and families of children in detention - with a special focus on families in extreme poverty. The program organizes families to advocate on their children's behalf, works with volunteers and mentors, provides transportation to detention centers and courts, and provides basic items not provided in detention centers such as

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Families

Provide transportation for parents and family members who, due to economic situations, cannot afford to travel to visit their children in prison.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Parents

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Juvenile Justice Advocates International (JJAI) created our Alternatives to Detention Project to address these abuses. The Alternative to Detention Project focuses on systemic reforms to justice system processes and practices in four areas 1) reducing time to trial for detained children, 2) filtering out low-risk youth so they are not detained awaiting trial, 3) creating networks of community-based alternatives, and 4) monitoring conditions in detention centers.

Juvenile Justice Advocates International (JJAI) created our Alternatives to Detention Project to address these abuses. The Alternative to Detention Project focuses on systemic reforms to justice system processes and practices in four areas 1) reducing time to trial for detained children, 2) filtering out low-risk youth so they are not detained awaiting trial, 3) creating networks of community-based alternatives, and 4) monitoring conditions in detention centers. JJAI subsequently started our Mobilize Mexico Project, which works with local volunteers and churches to provided direct assistance to the most impacted children, including providing basic supplies to children from extreme poverty (underwear, shoes, and toiletries), providing transportation to families to visit and attend court hearings, presenting workshops and classes in detention and special events.

JJAI currently works in Mexico with the Mexican National government and a number of state governments. We hire, train and equip local teams in each of the jurisdictions where we work to walk along side local governments in implementing our strategies.

Our projects in our pilot site of Chihuahua, Mexico had the following results:
• Reduction of time to trial for detained children from 291 days in 2016 to 90 days in 2017.
• Demonstration of a 40 percent reduction in detention admissions.
• Development of a National Detention Filtering Instrument based on our Chihuahua pilot, that is now being implemented in 5 additional states in Mexico.
• Detention center conditions audit showing a 42% compliance with international standards, which resulted in developing 12 recommendations and the creation of an inter-agency team to improve detention center policies and conditions.
• Delivery of 120 Care Packages (representing 100% of the need met in 2017).
• Transportation for 44 family visits (representing 100% of the need met in 2017).
• “Know Your Rights” workshops for 135 teens and 52 family members.
• Creation of a Family Round Table for families to advocate on their children´s behalf.
• Network of 7 community volunteers and 6 church partners.
We also are collaborating with the National Government to develop a National Juvenile Justice Model for treatment of children in the justice system.
We published the first international study on the duration of child pretrial detention, "Children in Pretrial Detention: Promoting Stronger International Time Limits” and presented it before the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child.
We have started three new projects replicating our model from Chihuahua, Mexico, in three additional states in Mexico.

Financials

Juvenile Justice Advocates International
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Juvenile Justice Advocates International

Board of directors
as of 5/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sherwood McKinnis

McKinnis & Doom LLP

Term: 2013 - 2021

Barbara Frey

University of Minnesota

Matthew Hunt

StudioPlus Software

Sarvesh Desai

Dorsey & Whitney

D. Sherwood McKinnis

McKinnis & Doom LLP

Mark Berken

Berkitra Supply Chain

Bart Lubow

Albino Garcia

La Pazita Institute

Andrea Daniela Martínez

CLUES

Nikhil Roy

Raquel Mariscal

W. Haywood Burns Institute

Victor Herrero Escrich

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 05/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data