MENDING MATTERS

We Hear YouTH

San Diego, CA   |  mendingmatters.org

Mission

Engage. Connect. Empower. Youth.

Partnering with schools to provide mental health services

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

MariaEsther Izquierdo-Hemmen

Main address

11835 Carmel Mountain Rd. Suite 1304-342

San Diego, CA 92128 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4080792

NTEE code info

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Student Services and Organizations (B80)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nearly 80% of youth defined as needing mental health services do not receive care. Furthermore, suicide is the second leading cause of death among youth ages 10-24. We provide school-based therapeutic and social emotional interventions, because we believe that all youth deserve to have access to mental health support. It is our responsibility as a service provider to meet young people where they are at.
Well-intentioned mental health organizations are often committed to programs which struggle to connect with youth, and practices motivated by profitability often impede the potential for real impact. We believe mending makes a difference, and it's worth our investment of time and energy in creating programs that are responsive to young people's culture and needs. It is through our vision and mission of empowering our youth community that we look forward to bringing continued positive impact to San Diego's students in the years to come.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Individual Therapy

We give students the opportunity to speak openly about their experiences in a confidential and safe environment. Our Master-level therapists implement a trauma-informed approach with all youth, utilizing therapeutic models that have proven to be effective when working with adolescents in a school setting.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Our curriculum emphasize meeting students where they are, both physically and mentally, and affords sufficient flexibility to adapt to the unique needs of the participants. Our programs take into consideration students’ unique backgrounds and previous influences, including gender, language and cultural differences, past trauma, personal experiences and beliefs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our therapists are trained in providing crisis intervention, suicide prevention and counseling services to students experiencing extreme emotional distress. We maintain relationships with community agencies, and connect students to specific support services as needed to facilitate the most effective care to youth in their times of crisis.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Our alternative to suspension programs offer students the option to participate in a curriculum based group in place of an at home suspension. Our programs provide students with research based information and interventions to assist students in engaging in positive decision making and the ability to change detrimental behaviors.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who completed intervention programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Alternatives to Suspension

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth who completed Mending Matters restorative intervention programs.

Number of youth who completed individual therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Individual Therapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth who received individual therapy.

Number of youth who received crisis intervention.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Crisis Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Youth who received short-term crisis support.

Number of youth who completed group therapy.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Group Therapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth who participated in group therapy.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goals at Mending Matters include:
1. Increasing access to mental health services for young people.
2. Providing relevant programs by connecting with and responding to youth culture.
3. Increasing our student's sense of self-efficacy and empowerment through social emotional learning.
4. Providing safe people and environments that promote our student's growth and healing.
5. Leaving a lasting positive impact on our school campuses.

In order to achieve our goals, Mending Matters employs the following strategies:
Strategy 1: Employ customized therapeutic interventions for every student and every campus based on identified needs.
We come onto our school campuses as a blank slate ready to learn from those we serve about what they need. We prioritize building relationships with our school staff and implementing interventions based on what they identify as the needs of their schools, rather than based on a particular grant or organizational objective. Similarly, we offer our therapists the flexibility to customize interventions toward client-identified goals and barriers and the permission to alter or discontinue an intervention when it is no longer beneficial to our students.

Strategy 2: Create and sustain an organizational culture that facilitates listening and responsiveness to youth culture.
We at Mending Matters believe that adults who care deeply about youth are the best facilitators for their mending. From our hiring process to our clinical supervision to our team culture, we prioritize conversations and actions as a team that promote client-directed service. Through this, we believe our students will experience greater empowerment and will lead to thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that respect self and others.

Strategy 3: Increase effectiveness of therapeutic interactions through support of our clinicians' development and training.
Adolescents tend to connect more with adults who start from a place of genuineness. Because of this, we know that therapeutic interactions increase when our therapists feel supported. We prioritize our clinicians' development through regular training and supervision customized to their particular styles and interests.

Strategy 4: Promote trauma-informed and welcoming learning environments for young people.
We practice trauma-informed principles throughout every aspect of our organization. Whether it's creating an aesthetically calming, inviting space on a campus or advocating for our clients, we understand that building a safe environment for individuals impacted by trauma requires attention to the details.

Strategy 5: Increase positive interactions on our school campuses by offering alternatives to suspension, mediation, and advocacy for therapeutic support.
Our schools and students know that positive interactions will only increase if we learn more about student motivation and goals. We offer alternative to suspension programs, mediation, and therapeutic support to promote pro-social and strengths-based interactions with students, rather than using discipline methods only to address interpersonal challenges.

Mending Matters possesses the following capabilities to meet our goals:

1. Therapists with demonstrated experience and dedicated passion to serve young people.

2. An organizational structure that possesses the adaptability to respond to the needs of schools and students.

3. The ability to build effective partnerships through communication and care.

4. Curriculum programs informed by research and best practices in addressing negative behavior, attendance, alcohol and drug use, conflict resolution, and adolescent development.

5. The collection of data and regular client feedback to continue informing our programs and practice.

Currently, Mending Matters serves 13 school sites throughout San Diego County.

In our years of service to schools in San Diego County, we had:
4, 297 referred students
592 student walk-ins
537 students received individual therapy
2, 968 students participated in our group programs
469 students received crisis support

Ultimately, we see our accomplishments in what our students and partners have said about us.

“Mending Matters have proven themselves to be completely student centered. They are quick to see any student we feel needs the support and care of a professional therapist. Always fully invested in the welfare of our students and, in my opinion, give their all while working with them. They have the ability to quickly assess and establish rapport with a wide variety of students in both individual and group settings. I have, on several occasions, placed students who were very leery of counseling in groups. In virtually every instance the students not only remain in the group but thrive and blossom" Guidance Counselor

“The staff and services provided through Mending Matters has not only been an anchor for some of our highest risk and most vulnerable students, but for our entire campus community. Many of the challenges and struggles that students bring to school with them prevent them from fully engaging in their academics. Mending Matters helps students develop the skills to cope and become more successful in all areas of their life, including the classroom. When issues arise in the community and spill onto campus, Mending Matters is already ready to help heal and restore peace."
Principal

"We were thrilled this past school year to be able to hire Mending Matters to be our onsite therapy provider. With their professionalism, flexibility and ability to work seamlessly with our school and students, we are able to provide critical services to our students in need. Hands down the best therapist I have ever worked with."
School Resource Coordinator

“Mending Matters is a chill group. Everyone talks about what they go through and what's on their minds. And it shows how everyone has their own problems, but overcomes them."
Male, 11th grade

“At the start of counseling, I was completely closed off to the idea of ever opening up to someone. It was extremely difficult to sit across someone I know nothing about and tell my situation. I walked away from my first meeting hanging onto the word 'hope.' I became more open to the idea of getting to know people and people getting to know me. I gained valuable techniques that helped me cope with the different situations I encountered. I was able to learn more about others and value myself. "
Female, 10th grade

“It may seem scary at first, but after awhile you start to look forward to it and feel like someone gets you."
Male, 9th grade

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We update our curriculum annually to reflect student feedback given in program surveys. During Summer 2020, we had an youth internship program. Feedback given during the program debrief shaped how we offered the program and topics included in the Fall.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

MENDING MATTERS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MENDING MATTERS

Board of directors
as of 3/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Stephen Speicher

Pediatric Resident, Children's Hospital - Los Angeles

Amalia Hernandez

School of Social Work at San Diego State University

Jay Moser

San Diego Police Department

Marla Kingkade

P.E.R.T.

Lucia Washburn

Retired, GUHSD

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/02/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.