CIRCLE A HOME FOR HORSES INC

Virginia Bch, VA   |  https://circleahome4horses.org

Mission

Non profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of at-risk children and rescued equines through paired bonding, learning, and fellowship.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Alicia Mahar

Main address

4345 Charity Neck Rd

Virginia Bch, VA 23457 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

46-4105488

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We see the problem as two-fold; helping youth identified as 'at-risk' and helping horses avoid the horrific journey to slaughter in Mexico and Canada. Equine therapy is quickly becoming a recognized mental health intervention for several populations, including youth identified as at-risk. Our mission also includes helping save horses from a horrific trip to Mexico or Canada for slaughter.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Equine At-Risk Youth Partnership

Our program pairs rescued horses with children, to help promote positive self-esteem, communication, self-confidence, safety and respect for others. Participants also learn basic fundamental horsemanship prior to riding lessons. Our at-risk youth program, funded by generous donors, is offered free to all participants. We rely 100% on community donations.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Accreditations

United Horse Coalition 2021

Awards

2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit 2021

GreatNonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

A Home for Every Horse 2021

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Circle A Home for Horses the equine rescue community across the United States through outreach, rescuing, networking, and fundraising to save horses found in neglectful, abusive, and often slaughter-bound situations. We service horse enthusiasts and lovers all over with the opportunity to adopt one of our rescues in-transition and provide a loving, mutually beneficial relationship with these incredible animals. Circle A Home for Horses also provides equine assisted therapy to the at-risk youth residents receiving inpatient mental health treatment at The Barry Robinson Center in Norfolk, VA.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Circle A Home for Horses is continuously working to improve our website, technology oversight, and public engagement in order to ensure we are providing the most up-to-date information in a transparent fashion, as well as being equipped to receive feedback from supporters, adopters, and network connections.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Anytime one of our adopters, vendors, service partners, community partners, etc. provide feedback offering insight regarding areas where we can improve, optimize, and/or streamline operations and customer service, we take that information as a catalyst for positive change. As a nonprofit it is imperative for us to work as a unified team with our supporters, both the general public and our business contacts. We welcome constructive feedback, new ideas, and even praise for things we are doing well...they all add up to our goal of operating with transparency and a desire to continuously improve our operations and the equines and people we serve!

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

CIRCLE A HOME FOR HORSES INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CIRCLE A HOME FOR HORSES INC

Board of directors
as of 4/2/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kate Flowers


Board co-chair

Ann-Louise Hittle

Gay Robbins

Circle A Home for Horses, Inc.

Daniel Flowers

Circle A Home for Horses, Inc.

Valerie Amster

Circle A Home for Horses, Inc.

Ellen Weisman

Circle A Home for Horses, Inc.

Alicia Mahar

Circle A Home for Horses, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/02/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/02/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.